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Searched for: montreal
14 Jun 2018 13:46
  • John667
  • John667's Avatar
I'm also looking for latex mattress in Canada, but closer to Montreal. I'd like to try Dormio but it's a 7hr drive, so I was wondering if there would be any alternative closer to where I live. Thanks!
25 Oct 2017 15:30
  • Beddy_Topper
  • Beddy_Topper's Avatar
Hi IWannaMeetSandman,

Any update on how you like your new setup? I am in Montreal and thinking of putting something similar together.
18 Aug 2017 10:33
  • Latexdude
  • Latexdude's Avatar
Hi Phoenix & Everyone,

I've been sleeping on a Latexco zoned mattress (5) for the last 20 years and enjoying every minute of it although the last few years have demanded a bit of tweaking. I am now looking for a new one but despite many hours searching the net (including this fantastic forum), haven't yet found a suitable replacement and would greatly appreciate any advice from you. I live in Canada near Montreal.

Here's what I'm looking for:
- 100% (OK, 95%) natural Dunlop latex (ideally certified by GOLS and Eco Institut)
- Minimum of 3 zones (firmer around hip area is essential, the other zones less so. I'm a back sleeper)
- Total height between 8" & 10"
- Overall firmness very high, probably around 35-40 ILD for the hip area and around 30 for the rest
-Topper of about 2" softer latex
- Some sort quilted layer of wool+organic cotton to finish things up
- A progressive construction would be nice with for ex, a 3" extra firm bottom layer, a 4" zoned layer and a 2" soft topper

The Obasan Acadia 2.0 or 3.0 come very close but my preference would be for a molded zoned mattress rather than separate moving parts as I suspect I would feel them. Greensleep has a new zoned offering but with similar separate parts (and you can't choose the firmness individually, you just move around the soft, medium and firm that are provided) and the 3" topper is probably too thick for someone who want good support sleeping on their back.

Similarly, the Dormio Sleep System is interesting but has 5" of latex on top of the zones layer and is a bit expensive as the size I require would be a special order.

I'm waiting to hear from Nature's embrace who could probably custom make one for me but probably also at a cost.

The best option (and deal) was found at Naturelle Organic Beds with all kinds of customization and great specs on paper but posts in this forum from a few years ago seem to indicate an unreliable company. Anyone know if the situation has changed? The salesperson/owner was certainly knowledgeable and very nice in the pre-buying phase of the deal.

I am not considering a DIY mattress for the time being but am not totally averse to it.
Have I overlooked anything? Any company I'm not aware of?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have,
Sincerely,
Latexman
04 Aug 2017 16:33
  • mimibel
  • mimibel's Avatar
Dear Phoenix ! First of all I want to thank you so much for your enormous work on this web site. It is a gold mine of informations about mattress and the industry. Please excuse my English ( I'm a French Canadian). After reading your site ( ouf ! it is huge, but worth reading for sur) I decided to go all the way dunlop latex. But I lived in Vald'or, witch is a 7 hours drive north of Montreal. So I went to Matelas de rêve ( it is a 1 hour drive and the only place around who carry latex mattress) to try the Natura World mattresses and when I got in the store I found out they (Zedbed) have change the configuration of the mattress with adding some soya mousse on the top layer. ( at least the Blossom Ferm 2016) Back home I called zedbed ( after I read there web site ( so confusing without transparency) for more informations and the lady ( who was very nice) couldn't answer my questions. From the beginning I was interested to buy from FMC but afraid to buy on line (without days trial). That was a good idea to tried some latex mattress in a store. If I may suggest to everybody, to try the latex mattress near by store and you will have a good idea what latex feel like ( very much springing that I thought and much more comfy) but it is just my humble and personal point off view. And you'll be more comfortable to buy online witch for my experience its less expensive. And now I'm pretty sure what kind of mattress ( a bit stressful !) I will received from FMC witch I just order one (Presto) King from them. Mario, the owner was very helpful and full transparent with all my questions. They now have a special with free shipping in Québec, two latex pillows and no taxes !!! I will let you know about my purchase in about 2 weeks when I received it. Again thank you SO much, dear Phoenix and all the people who share, for all the wonderfull work you had done on this website, it vanish away so much confusion about mattress. Keep up the good work my friend, you do help a lot of people. Blessing and best regards ! Mimibel from Val d'or, ( Abitibi) Québec.
12 Feb 2017 09:49
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Sharin,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I’ve been reading many of your very thorough posts, thank you.

You’re very welcome.

I have a mattress that I bought several years ago. It is a block of foam – the tag says 100% polyurethane foam. When I bought it, it was called memory foam, but I have no idea if it really is, it wasn’t a speciality mattress vendor.

Technically speaking, memory foam can be classified as a slow-recovery type of polyurethane foam, so I wouldn’t be able to say what was in your mattress without performing “mattress surgery”. If it was sold to you as a memory foam mattress, typically those mattresses would have a base core of polyfoam, then maybe a little more polyfoam on top of that (perhaps a bit softer) and then maybe some memory foam on top. So, just as an example, you could have a 10” “memory foam” mattress. It might have a 6” dense and firm polyfoam core, then maybe a 2” “transition” layer of a bit softer (lower IFD/ILD) polyfoam, and then on top of that 2” of visco-elastic memory foam. Of course, it’s also entirely possible that your mattress could be multiple layers or even a solid block of polyfoam.

It has always been a great support and I sank in enough to be comfortable. It remains very firm. I developed arthritis in a few places over the past year. Now it hurts my hips and knee (although I sleep with a pillow between my knees).

I’m sorry to hear about your arthritis. Keeping the pillow between your knees certainly can assist with the stresses on the Iliotibial band and hip flexors on your hip that is not being slept upon, and also help with tenderness where the two knees would usually touch, but as you’re aware it won’t assist with pressure point relief on the hip that is in contact with the mattress. It is common when developing arthritis that you would desire a bit more surface plushness.

From what I’ve read a topper would help, but am not sure what kind of topper would be best over that kind of mattress. I’d like to avoid feather, and likely couldn’t sleep directly on wool.

The good news is that there is a topper thread here that discusses the various toppers available, and there is also a link there for online retailers of these toppers. The key would be to make sure that your base mattress is not sagging and is still providing good alignment, which you seem to indicate it is.

I am a woman and a side sleeper. When I don't have pain I tend not to move around a lot. I also have fibromyalgia but that is mainly under control with medication, which unfortunately doesn't help with the arthritis. I live in Montreal, Canada, so if you have suggestions for where to shop here those would be appreciated as well.

Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Montreal area are listed in post #276 here . I can’t keep track of the inventory in each store, so you’ll have to do some phoning to find out which stores currently might currently offer toppers for you to sample.

Hopefully the information in the topper thread (more than likely focusing upon latex or memory foam based upon you wish to avoid wool and down), and any local retailers you visit, will be assistive in getting you some pressure point relief. And as a topper will perform differently on your mattress at home as opposed to a showroom mattress you might try, you’ll also want to investigate any potential return/exchange polices of any business you visit in the unfortunate circumstance where things don’t turn out as well as you had expected.

Good luck!

Phoenix
12 Feb 2017 06:53
  • Sharin
  • Sharin's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,
I’ve been reading many of your very thorough posts, thank you.

I have a mattress that I bought several years ago. It is a block of foam – the tag says 100% polyurethane foam. When I bought it, it was called memory foam, but I have no idea if it really is, it wasn’t a speciality mattress vendor. It has always been a great support and I sank in enough to be comfortable. It remains very firm. I developed arthritis in a few places over the past year. Now it hurts my hips and knee (although I sleep with a pillow between my knees). From what I’ve read a topper would help, but am not sure what kind of topper would be best over that kind of mattress. I’d like to avoid feather, and likely couldn’t sleep directly on wool.

I am a woman and a side sleeper. When I don't have pain I tend not to move around a lot. I also have fibromyalgia but that is mainly under control with medication, which unfortunately doesn't help with the arthritis. I live in Montreal, Canada, so if you have suggestions for where to shop here those would be appreciated as well.

Thanks,
Sharin
06 Feb 2017 17:01
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Mimi,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I want to start this post by thanking you for your amazing website. I've spent hours reading it to educate myself in my process of buying a new mattress. I can imagine how much time and effort goes into keeping it up and I am very grateful for your thorough and no-nonsense approach.

You’re very welcome and thank you for the compliment.

I would also prefer if the mattress wasn't sprayed with fire-retardants but I don' know if that's even possible. And for the glues to be the least toxic possible. The replies I got from the store clerk on these questions were not satisfactory.

Fire retardant chemicals have never been mandatory. What is required is that a mattress pass the 16 CFR 1632 and 1633 fire regulations with or without the use of fire retardant chemicals (the method of passing the regulations isn't specified in the regulations). The most common method used to pass the regulations is the use of inherent fire barrier fabrics that are either quilted into the cover or are wrapped around the inner materials of the mattress like a sock. There is more information about fire retardant methods that are commonly used in the industry in post #2 here and in post #4 here .

1) I live in Montreal. Do you have a few manufacturers or retailers that you recommend I could explore in the Greater Montreal Area that sell good quality latex beds and will provide transparent information?

Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Montreal area are listed in post #276 here . I can’t keep track of the inventory in each store, so you’ll have to do some phoning to find out which stores currently might currently offer latex.

2) I am very weary of buying online. It seems like I really should try the mattress first. But having tested a few combinations in stores I might be able to figure out exactly what I need and order it (nervously) through an online store. So that is also an option. I would prefer to buy from a Canadian online store to avoid expensive shipping and customs. Any recommendations?

There is a list of online mattress sources for Canadians in post #21 here .

3) In a post on your website, I read that there is such a thing as 100% natural Talalay, as well as blended (petrochemical + natural) Talalay. I am confused. I thought the divide was :
- Dunlop is 100% natural latex without petrochemicals
- Talalay is blended with petrochemicals
Can you educate me on the different types of Talalay and Dunlop and/or other latexes? And what are the pros and cons of the various types? Most companies will just say "it's Dunlop" or "It's Talalay" without any further details.

Latex is produced either in the Dunlop method or the Talalay method. Either method may produce latex foam made of natural latex (100% Natural, or 100% NR), synthetic latex (100% Styrene-Butadiene, or 100% SBR) or a blend of natural and synthetic (SBR/NR).

There is quite a bit of detail about the differences between the two production processes and blends in post #6 here .

I hope that information is helpful to you.

Phoenix
06 Feb 2017 16:26
  • Mimi
  • Mimi's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,

I want to start this post by thanking you for your amazing website. I've spent hours reading it to educate myself in my process of buying a new mattress. I can imagine how much time and effort goes into keeping it up and I am very grateful for your thorough and no-nonsense approach.

Secondly, I wanted to specify that I am shopping around for a latex mattress. I sarted my reasearch thinking I wanted inner-coil because this is what I previously had and it served me well. But I discovered that latex can provide a very high quality mattress with lower levels of chemicals, VOCs, etc. than traditional inner-coil or high density foam mattresses.

I am completely discouraged to go to Essentia, they seem not-transparent enough and they never answered my email. Greensleep options I've tried in store are way too soft for me. Zedbed has come most close to what I want, but I can't seem to find the right core+comfort layer combination at the store I've visited. They have a model that has a high-density foam core and a talalay comfort layer but I prefer not to buy HD foam. They have a Dunlop core mattress with a memory foam comfort layer but I don't like memory foam.

From testing those two out I believe I would like a Dunlop latex mattress (6 inches) with a comfort layer (2 inch Talalay). But I can't seem to find one!

I would also prefer if the mattress wasn't sprayed with fire-retardants but I don' know if that's even possible. And for the glues to be the least toxic possible. The replies I got from the store clerk on these questions were not satisfactory.

So, I have three questions for you :

1) I live in Montreal. Do you have a few manufacturers or retailers that you recommend I could explore in the Greater Montreal Area that sell good quality latex beds and will provide transparent information?

2) I am very weary of buying online. It seems like I really should try the mattress first. But having tested a few combinations in stores I might be able to figure out exactly what I need and order it (nervously) through an online store. So that is also an option. I would prefer to buy from a Canadian online store to avoid expensive shipping and customs. Any recommendations?

3) In a post on your website, I read that there is such a thing as 100% natural Talalay, as well as blended (petrochemical + natural) Talalay. I am confused. I thought the divide was :
- Dunlop is 100% natural latex without petrochemicals
- Talalay is blended with petrochemicals

Can you educate me on the different types of Talalay and Dunlop and/or other latexes? And what are the pros and cons of the various types? Most companies will just say "it's Dunlop" or "It's Talalay" without any further details.

Many thanks!
Mimi
04 Feb 2017 08:40
  • tonybat
  • tonybat's Avatar
Hello,

I'm glad I found this forum and this review topic. I ordered the Novosbed King medium firm on Thursday. I live in Montreal, QC and got it delivered Friday afternoon, which is extremely fast. So the delivery experience was great. Only downside is that, I was expecting Fedex to deliver (tracking number with Fedex) but then "Discount" company delivered and they were like "if the client doesn't help us move the mattress out of the truck, we will return it to Fedex". Anyhow, they placed the box in my garage and later on I asked a friend to help me take the box upstairs. It's a very heavy box so make sure you have someone to help and it will still be heavy.

The mattress took full shape in like 3-4 hours, it does have a slight smell but it's nothing serious, I believe this is normal and I expect it to go away in few days. I didn't yet try sleeping on it, so I will report my findings when I do.

Again, thank you all for sharing your honest opinions which helped me decide on purchasing this brand.
23 Dec 2016 12:34
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi iggy,

I know it is not specific to Montreal, but post #2 has a few more links to wool mattress producers in North America. These can be a good reference for you for these types of mattresses, and DIY Natural Bedding even has componentry to make your own product, should that be attractive to you or potentially more affordable.

Phoenix
22 Dec 2016 16:27
  • iggy
  • iggy's Avatar
Ok I did my best so far and tried not to overpost there, but reality check was even more confusing... to my knowledge theres is no one In Montreal who sells/produces that "old school" type, but organic/natural type of mattress which uses only three components (coils, wool and cotton top)... I being even told to try hastens (lol) with their price range its out of question...

So far I stumbled upon only two Canadian manufacturers , who has meet the criteria of coil/wool only combo- shepperdsdream with their "the regular" model and blacksheepmattress with their "suffolk" product...

(sleeptek has discontinued their 1000 classic series and despite being told look for a small dealer who might have one there is none... and naturepedic has a whopping price over $2k which is also out of range for me...)

If anyone has experience (first hand) with these products, or knows another manufacturer of natural/organic mattress with no any kind of foam or gel/latex/rubber, please share, thanks
14 Dec 2016 14:58
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi iggy,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

This answer might be a bit more detailed than what you wanted, but I' m hoping to assist you in optimizing your sleep environment as much as possible in preparation for summer.

While it's not always possible to track down temperature regulation issues for any particular person on a specific mattress because there are so many variables involved (including your room temperature and humidity, your sheets, your bedding and bedclothes, your mattress protector or any mattress pads you are using, the firmness of your mattress, and where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range) and some people can sleep warmer on mattresses that most people are generally fine with ... there is quite a bit of information about overall temperature regulation in post #2 here .

In very general terms ... the materials, layers, and components of a sleeping system that are closer to your skin will have a bigger effect on airflow, moisture transport, and temperature regulation than materials, layers, and components that are further away from your skin and softer mattresses or foam toppers will tend to be more "insulating" and for some people can sleep warmer than firmer versions of the same material.

Talalay latex tends to be more breathable than Dunlop latex. There are also variations in each category and less dense foams tend to be more breathable than denser foams while firmer foams tend to allow less sinking in which can mean there is less insulating foam material against your body. While the upper layers of a mattress are the most significant part of temperature and moisture regulation ... deeper support components that allow more airflow can also have an effect and so innersprings will also tend to sleep cooler than foam support cores as long as the air can ventilate to the outside of the mattress.

All foams are insulators (rather than heat conductors) so to some degree they will all be warmer than mattresses that contain no foam at all (such as mattresses that only have an innerspring and layers of natural fibers on top), and this may be the information that you previously read on the forum.

Some of the other factors involved in how warm a mattress sleeps are how closely the foam conforms to your body (the more closely it conforms around you the more insulating it is), how soft or thick the foam in the comfort layers are (the softer/thicker it is the deeper you will sink into the more insulating materials), the type of quilting used in the mattress (natural fibers allow for more airflow and humidity control which translates into better temperature regulation), the type of ticking (cover) used (natural or more breathable fibers such as cotton or viscose or even some of the more breathable synthetics will wick away moisture and ventilate better and humidity control is a key part of temperature control), and any cooling technologies used in the mattress such as ventilating and moisture wicking materials, heat conductive materials, or phase change materials. Additionally, having the mattress elevated off of the floor will promote more air circulation.


In addition to this ... the mattress protector you choose along with your sheets and other bedding and what you wear when you sleep will also have a significant effect on temperature regulation because they can either add to the insulating effect or to the ventilating and moisture wicking effect of your mattress. You can see more about the effect of different mattress protectors in post #89 here . Bedding made from natural fibers or viscose materials (like bamboo) will also tend to be cooler than synthetic fibers and linen sheets along with silk are probably the coolest of all the natural fibers for those where sleeping temperature is a main priority. There is more about sheets and bedding in post #7 here . In many cases manipulating the mattress protector, sheets, or bedding to cooler versions can make "enough" of a difference for many people who would otherwise sleep hot on a mattress.

And all of this is separate from any environmental conditions in the bedroom (temperature and humidity levels with higher humidity adding to the perception of heat), on the physiology and tendency of the person themselves to sleep warmer or cooler and where they are in the "oven to iceberg" range, and on their weight and body type which will affect how deeply they sink into the foam layers of the mattress. As you are eschewing air conditioning, humidity in the summer can have as great an impact upon your sleeping comfort as the temperature.

Ventilation and moisture wicking transports humidity and moisture (and the heat it contains) away from the body and either stores it inside a natural fiber (like wool) and away from the body or releases it to the surrounding atmosphere where it is dispersed. The water vapor is what transports the heat away from the body. If the water vapor and moisture is transported and/or stored away from the body, then the humidity levels closer to the body are lower and more water vapor can be produced (perspiration) in response to excess heat which keeps the cycle going. Lower humidity levels next to the skin are more cooling than higher humidity levels (just like going outside on a hot humid day feels hotter than going outside on a hot day with the same temperature where the relative humidity is lower). This is the reason that wool is a great temperature regulator because it traps air which is an insulator when it is too cold but also allows humid air and moisture to be transported away from the body or stores moisture inside the fiber which keeps it away from the skin and keeps the cooling cycle going (which is why it is used in both cold and hot climates).

In summary ... it's always a combination of several interacting factors that determines the sleeping temperature of a mattress in combination with a specific person and environment. Overall, the innerspring with wool on top (provided the wool wasn’t too thick or soft, enveloping you) would generally provide the best air circulation for you.

Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Montreal area are listed in post #276 here . I can’t keep track of the inventory in each store, so you’ll have to do some phoning to find out which stores currently might offer the items you are considering.

A forum search on Montreal (you can just click the link) will also bring up more comments and feedback from other members in the area that may be helpful as well.

I hope that information about temperature regulation (and some of the many factors that influence it) is helpful.

Phoenix
14 Dec 2016 13:50
  • iggy
  • iggy's Avatar
Hello there,

Long story short, I have moved past summer from all furnished to an empty apt- as result still slips on the floor in DIY combo (consists of sleeping bag and two comforters)- having lowerback pains and sciatica (left leg) it doesnt help much to have a restorative slip.... next, new apt bedroom faces sunny side and due to the windows model doesn`t allow a window conditioner- only option allowed is indoor a/c, whcih is not an option as well as being told they are extremely noisy and low efficiency (ie slipping next to a diesel power generator is not my dream at all) -so, as the NY approaches (and respective resolutions) I'm in search now of a which combo/model will give lowest "heat ratio" when summer comes - I was thinking "talalay latex" before, only to read somewhere on the forums "no foam/latex gives a cooller effect then coil/wool combo"... then I read about "all wool" mattress type and now I stuck with decision which route to go... I`m in Montreal and prefer to try before buy... any ideas? thanks in advance!
27 May 2016 08:27
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Flana,

We have been looking for a mattress for close to 3 years (off/on we surrendered then looked again).
We like foam (and memory if possible), do not like bounce, do not like springs. We have two small kids so wanted something eco in that we didn't want to inhale dangerous VOCs.
We finally settled on a Magniflex thinking it was the best choice. This model:
www.magniflex.com/northamerica/en/classico/37-magni-10.html
When we unpacked it (comes rolled as you know), it smelled VERY STRONG. Since they (a few weeks) it has dissipated but not entirely. I am incredibly nervous for my health, even though sometimes the worst VOCs are undetectable by scent. Are we better off with a Casper or Endy? This Magniflex is Oekotex Certified class 2 (not for kids under 3- what does that mean??)


The only reliable way to to assess the "safety" of different materials in more general terms is based on lab tests and the certifications they have for harmful substances and VOCs so that you have some assurance than the VOCs are below the testing limits for the certification.

While it may be more information than you are looking for ... there is a lot more information in post #2 here and the more detailed posts and information it links to about safe, natural, organic, "chemical free", and "green" mattresses and mattress materials that can help you sort through some of the marketing information and terminology that you will encounter in the industry and can help you differentiate between them and answer "how safe is safe enough for me" and that can help you decide on the type of materials and components you are most comfortable having in your mattress or on the certifications that may be important to you. These types of issues are complex and are generally specific to each person and their individual sensitivities, circumstances, criteria, beliefs, and lifestyle choices.

Most people that are looking for an "organic" mattress are usually concerned more with "safety" than whether the materials have an actual organic certification. There is more information about the three different levels of organic certifications in post #2 here and some of the benefits of an organic certification in post #3 here and there is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.

The "bottom line" is that if the materials in a mattress or the mattress itself has a reliable safety certification (and all the mattresses you mentioned do) then for most people it would certainly be "safe enough".

Am I better off with latex?


Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ). The best way to know which type of materials or which type of mattresses you tend to prefer in general terms will be based on your own testing and personal experience because different people can have very different preferences.

The only latex that has no glue, or is considered organic and 'safe' is supremely expensive (Sleeptex, Obasan) which is out of our league for awhile.


All the latex you are likely to encounter (either Dunlop or Talalay that is made with either natural or synthetic rubber or a blend of both) will have a reliable certification such as Oeko-Tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, or C2C and based on actual testing I would also consider any type or blend of latex to be a very "safe" material in terms of harmful substances and VOC's.

The choice between different types and blends of latex is also more of a preference and budget choice rather than a "better/worse" choice and any type or blend of latex is a durable material relative to other types of foam materials. There is more about the different types and blends of latex in post #6 here and more about how Dunlop compares to Talalay in general in post #7 here but the best way to know which type or blend of latex you tend to prefer will be based on your own testing and/or your own personal experience.

The other thing that is odd is that the Magniflex was softer in store. It's very comfortable but was much softer.


There will be a break in and adjustment period for any new mattress or sleeping system as the mattress loses any of it's "false firmness" and the cover stretches and loosens a little and the materials settle and your body gets used to a sleeping surface that is different from what it is used to (see post #3 here . This would typically be a few weeks but it can be shorter or longer depending on the specifics of the person and the mattress (higher density materials like latex can take longer) and it can be surprising to many people how much their sleeping experience can change over the course of the first month or so. The mattress in the store was probably already broken in.

I am in Montreal and I know you pointed to some latex distributors but when I've called them it seems their 'organic latex' is questionable in certification (better than Oekotex?). Everyone is talking about open source foam (i.e if we were to build a foam base then latex top part). I'm confused.


I don't know what "open source" foam means (open source is a term that I'm only familiar with in relation to software).

In more general terms ... I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

It sounds like you may have seen this already but just in case you haven't ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Montreal area (subject to making sure than any mattress you consider meets the quality/value guidelines I linked in the previous paragraph) are listed in post #276 here .

A forum search on Montreal (you can just click the link) will also bring up more comments and feedback from other members in the area that may be helpful as well.

In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
27 May 2016 07:21
  • Flana
  • Flana's Avatar
We have been looking for a mattress for close to 3 years (off/on we surrendered then looked again).
We like foam (and memory if possible), do not like bounce, do not like springs. We have two small kids so wanted something eco in that we didn't want to inhale dangerous VOCs.
We finally settled on a Magniflex thinking it was the best choice. This model:
magniflex.com/northamerica/en/classico/37-magni-10.html
When we unpacked it (comes rolled as you know), it smelled VERY STRONG. Since they (a few weeks) it has dissipated but not entirely. I am incredibly nervous for my health, even though sometimes the worst VOCs are undetectable by scent. Are we better off with a Casper or Endy? This Magniflex is Oekotex Certified class 2 (not for kids under 3- what does that mean??) Am I better off with latex? The only latex that has no glue, or is considered organic and 'safe' is supremely expensive (Sleeptex, Obasan) which is out of our league for awhile. The other thing that is odd is that the Magniflex was softer in store. It's very comfortable but was much softer. I am in Montreal and I know you pointed to some latex distributors but when I've called them it seems their 'organic latex' is questionable in certification (better than Oekotex?). Everyone is talking about open source foam (i.e if we were to build a foam base then latex top part). I'm confused.
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: magniflex.com/northamerica/en/classico/37-magni-10.html
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