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Searched for: best mattress ever alexander love bed
17 Nov 2015 19:15
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi BojackHorseman,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I'm a bit on the heavier side, fluctuating around 220 (give or take five pounds), and I do worry about the longevity of the bed. Tuft and Needle worries me the most in this regard, as they're newer to the scene. I also want something that will hold up to the stresses of an active couple, so to speak.

Flexus is all latex and has the highest prices, Nest is a good compromise on price but only on their non-Latex beds (Flexus is cheaper for all-Latex), and Tuft and Needle is by far the cheapest, but also uses polyfoam. Will polyfoam be able to stand up to heavier use? Is the price difference (about $1000) justified for a Flexus latex bed over a Nest non-latex bed, like the Alexander or Love Bed?


There is more about the 3 most important parts of "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price or course and the options you have available after a purchase).

While I can't speak to how a mattress will feel for someone else ... outside of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) the most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress always depends on knowing the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new or how long a manufacturer has been in business) so I would always make sure that you can find out the information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to confirm that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

There is more about Tuft & Needle and some of the other "simplified choice" mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice topic and as you can see there are no lower quality materials or weak links in their mattress relative to your weight range that would compromise the durability or useful life of their mattress.

The same would be true for the Nest Bedding mattresses and the Flexus mattresses of course and with higher quality/density and more durable materials there will also be more "bonus time" relative to the useful life of the mattress.

There is also more detailed information about the many variables that can affect the durability and useful life of a mattress relative to different people in post #4 here

My wife has pretty severe allergies, and I'm not sure which of these beds may be better for that, or if it even matters at all. I know I need to look into hypoallergenic bedding and pillows, but I don't know if the mattress makes a big difference too.


That would depend on what your wife was allergic to (and avoiding those specific allergens). There is no specific definition or meaning for "hypoallergenic" ( see here ) and when it comes to mattresses this is more of a marketing term than anything else but the most common allergies are to dust mites particles and other airborne small particles rather than the materials in a mattress. There is more information about dust mites and allergies and methods that can be used to control dust mite populations or other allergens in post #2 here and in post #3 here . There is also more about allergy encasements in post #2 here .

Since we're changing bed sizes, we'll need a new foundation. I'm considering a platform bed, but I notice Flexus in particular stresses a box spring. As long as the base uses slats with 3" spacing or under, does it matter which foundation I use?


There is more information about the different support systems (bedframes and foundations or platform beds) that are generally suitable for different types of mattresses and some examples of each of them in post #1 here

With an all latex mattress then it would be a good idea to use a slatted foundation or platform bed that has gaps between the slats of 3" or less. With mattresses that use a polyfoam base layer then slats with gaps that are about 5" or less would be "OK" although I would tend to use 4" as a more suitable guideline. Flexus suggests and sells a foundation for use with their latex mattresses ... not a box spring (see the bottom of the page here).
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: flexuscomfort.com/natural-latex-mattress-natural-comfort.html

Once you have narrowed down your options to a list of finalists that are all choices between "good and good" and none of them have any lower quality materials or "weak links" in their design relative to your weight range and if there are no clear winners between them (which is usually a good indication that you have done some very good research) then you are in the fortunate position that any of them would likely be a suitable choice and post #2 here can help you make a final choice based on your local testing or mattresses you have slept well on, your more detailed conversations about each of them, your confidence about PPP and the suitability of each one, their prices, your preferences for different types of materials, the options you have after a purchase to fine tune the mattress or exchange or return the mattress or individual layers, any additional extras that are part of each purchase, and on "informed best judgement" based on all the other objective, subjective, and intangible parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
17 Nov 2015 18:30
  • BojackHorseman
  • BojackHorseman's Avatar
Hi all,

Many moons ago I purchased a major brand name bed at a major brand name mattress store, and it hasn't been the worst purchase in the world but it's starting to show its limitations. I also bought it while I was single and I'm now married and both my wife and I would prefer the wideness of a king to stretch out on, the queen is okay but feels confining at times.

I've spent a lot of time on this site looking at the tutorials and guides and comments on the forums. I live in the greater Los Angeles area and would prefer to get a bed from a place that has a showroom where my wife and I can test the beds out before putting one in our bedroom. I've narrowed the list down to Flexus Comfort and Nest Bedding, both of which are recommended here on the site and have reasonable prices for what they offer. I've also decided to entertain looking at Tuft and Needle. Although they don't have a showroom, the convenience of their system, and the low prices and many positive comments about them, make them worth looking at.

Here are some of the factors affecting us:

I'm a bit on the heavier side, fluctuating around 220 (give or take five pounds), and I do worry about the longevity of the bed. Tuft and Needle worries me the most in this regard, as they're newer to the scene. I also want something that will hold up to the stresses of an active couple, so to speak.

My wife has pretty severe allergies, and I'm not sure which of these beds may be better for that, or if it even matters at all. I know I need to look into hypoallergenic bedding and pillows, but I don't know if the mattress makes a big difference too.

Since we're changing bed sizes, we'll need a new foundation. I'm considering a platform bed, but I notice Flexus in particular stresses a box spring. As long as the base uses slats with 3" spacing or under, does it matter which foundation I use?

Flexus is all latex and has the highest prices, Nest is a good compromise on price but only on their non-Latex beds (Flexus is cheaper for all-Latex), and Tuft and Needle is by far the cheapest, but also uses polyfoam. Will polyfoam be able to stand up to heavier use? Is the price difference (about $1000) justified for a Flexus latex bed over a Nest non-latex bed, like the Alexander or Love Bed?

Of course at the end of the day, the feel is the most important, but I would love to be able to include these other factors when making the decision with my wife.

I apologize in advance if some of this info has been asked for before, there's a lot to digest on this site and I haven't been able to get all of it, despite my best efforts!

Thank you kindly!
15 Nov 2015 15:14
  • assassin10000
  • assassin10000's Avatar

Hi terrieb,

Don't buy a firm mattress if you want a soft one, you'll hate it.


As I mentioned in my previous reply I would always keep in mind that softness and firmness is relative and subjective and a mattress that feels soft for one person may feel much firmer to someone else (or vice versa). Someone that "needs" a firmer mattress (such as those that are in higher weight ranges) can also have the additional risk of sleeping out of alignment with a mattress that is too soft for their body type and sleeping positions (either comfort layers that are too thick and soft or a support core that is too soft).

I would never assume that a mattress that is either "firm enough" or "soft enough" for a particular person will feel the same or would be suitable for someone else to sleep on.


@Nene1957,

you should go to mattress stores and see what feels best. I think people under estimate that you need to go and actually lie down on mattresses and find out what your preference is. Then after you determine your preference, you can search for companies with top quality materials that are the most similar to the one you've selected for comfort.


I would completely agree with this. I think it's always a good idea to do some local testing to get a better general sense of the types of materials or mattresses and the general firmness ranges that someone will tend to do best with that they can use as a very approximate reference point if they end up deciding to purchase an online mattress.

Phoenix


Also don't forgot with feel (imo) there is the comfort layers which can give you that soft on a cloud feeling with pressure relief while having the support layers below keep your back/spine in alignment to prevent problems and pain. What I'm trying to say is that a mattress could have a soft/med comfort layer(s) over a firm, extra firm or hard support layer; which could feel great to you but be labelled a firm... and you may miss out on whats best for you by not testing in person if at all possible.


Phoenix is extraordinarily right that 'feel' is very subjective, and best to test locally to figure out what materials, construction and approximate firmnesses 'feel' right to you versus what is labelled by someone else or the companies themselves as soft/med/firm.


I was doing some testing yesterday on an all natural dunlop mattress and found that to me the feel of :
3" soft/25 ild over
6"(3x2) med/28 ild

In a regular style mattress case (organic cotton/wool on top felt firmer and for me had less pressure relief than a:
3" med/28 ild over
6" (3x2) firm/31 ild

In just an organic cotton stretch case.

I actually ordered the second option after having spent 2-3 hours trying every other combination available in the store. But, I had also done testing at several other stores and spent many hours reading/researching based on my testing and had a pretty good idea of what works/felt best for me... so much so, that if I had ordered this online/sight unseen (which I almost did), it was exactly what I would have started with.


yuppicide

I'm in a similar weight range as you. I've come to find out that unfortunately im a side, back and front sleeper. Which makes finding a mattress a bit more difficult, as i have to choose very carefully so I don't compromise one position being good for another. Such as picking something great for side sleeping but terrible for stomach sleeping.

In any case, I'm within a couple hours drive of a nest bedding store (since you mentioned them) and I did visit to try out all 3 firmnesses of the love bed and the alexander.

I actually did not like any of the alexanders, for me they either failed to keep me in alignment, or failed to have the pressure relief when side sleeping.

For the love bed the soft was a major no, the medium was ok but still way too soft. But the big suprise was the firm was actually not too firm, with the zoned latex layer it was actually comfortable for side sleeping (imo - even though the website says differently, but this could be due to my higher weight) while still allowing stomach sleeping without going into a swayback/curved spine position that could leave me in pain in the morning. It wasnt quite as 'plush' feeling to the hand as the soft or medium as it doesnt have the extra quilted top, but still very nice.

It was actually my 2nd choice until yesterday which dropped it to 3rd. My original 1st choice was a $2700/2800 matress which I was attempting to duplicate and think I got close to, for significantly less. (Again, many thanks to Phoenix and the info on this site).

Andrew
07 Oct 2015 18:28
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi akilkris,

I am a male, 6'1" tall, about 180 lbs, and like to sleep on my back most of the times, but also roll on the sides during my sleep. At the Nest store today, I found that the medium Love bed was a bit too soft with more sinkage than I would have liked, and the firm one was a little too hard for me with extra support for the back but not as much comfort for my side.. So the nice store sales rep asked me to try a 2 inch bamboo foam topper on the firm mattress, and I found that to be a really good fit for both my back support and side comfort. I really liked everything about it and how it felt, but the topper adds up to a $100 to the price of the Love bed queen mattress. And then towards the end, I tried their Alexander medium mattress and absolutely loved it! It was the perfect balance of support and comfort and I just didnt feel any discomfort at all. But obviously it was over my price range at $1200.

I am now stuck in this dilemma if I should give the Brooklyn bed a try with medium firmness as this is well within my budget. Based on my experience with the Nest Firm Love bed + 2 inch bamboo topper, do you think I should do the same thing with the BME as well? Or should I just get the medium BME, try it out during the trial window?

Please let me know your suggestions.



There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness as well and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

I would also keep in mind that latex is a completely different material than memory foam and while I can't speak to how any mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances ... outside of PPP the most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability and assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the guidelines here ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses (see this article ) are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice. There is more about how latex and memory foam compare in post #2 here .

While your own careful testing or personal experience is the most reliable way to know whether a mattress is a good "match" for you in terms of comfort and PPP ... when you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart (which would certainly include Brooklyn Bedding) and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

I would probably start with just a mattress by itself because it may be all you need and there is no reason to go to the extra expense of adding a topper if you don't need it. You can always add a topper afterwards if your sleeping experience indicates that you need to.

Phoenix
07 Oct 2015 17:40
  • akilkris
  • akilkris's Avatar
Hi,

This is my first post and I have been lurking around for a while here trying to get as much info as possible.. Thanks to the wonderful forum!

Based on all the reviews and reading so far, I wanted to give the Brooklyn Bedding Best Mattress Ever (BME) a try since they have a good trial window of 120 days and is the most affordable option for me (besides Tuft and Needle, but I feel it might be too firm for me).. I wanted to go with their medium mattress it is the most common option.

However, I decided to try out the Nest Beds today at my local store in CA, especially the "Love beds" as they are similarly priced. I wanted to share my experience with you so that I can get your feedback on which mattress to get.

I am a male, 6'1" tall, about 180 lbs, and like to sleep on my back most of the times, but also roll on the sides during my sleep. At the Nest store today, I found that the medium Love bed was a bit too soft with more sinkage than I would have liked, and the firm one was a little too hard for me with extra support for the back but not as much comfort for my side.. So the nice store sales rep asked me to try a 2 inch bamboo foam topper on the firm mattress, and I found that to be a really good fit for both my back support and side comfort. I really liked everything about it and how it felt, but the topper adds up to a $100 to the price of the Love bed queen mattress. And then towards the end, I tried their Alexander medium mattress and absolutely loved it! It was the perfect balance of support and comfort and I just didnt feel any discomfort at all. But obviously it was over my price range at $1200.

I am now stuck in this dilemma if I should give the Brooklyn bed a try with medium firmness as this is well within my budget. Based on my experience with the Nest Firm Love bed + 2 inch bamboo topper, do you think I should do the same thing with the BME as well? Or should I just get the medium BME, try it out during the trial window?

Please let me know your suggestions.

Thanks!
23 Sep 2015 11:49
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Fabphilly,

1, I am a small-boned woman with moderate hip arthritis, though I'm very athletic. I''m not sure if my somewhat lackluster firm foam (not memory foam) bed is making things worse or not and am wondering if any information has been compiled on what types of mattresses are best for people with hip pain?


I would always keep in mind that the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress) or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more accurate than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

Unfortunately there is no specific type of mattress that is best for any specific health issues in general because each person is unique. In other words a mattress that is perfect for one person with hip pain may be completely unsuitable for someone else with similar hip pain to sleep on. In very general terms a mattress that is "best for you" would need to have comfort layers that are soft and thick enough to contour to the shape of your body and redistribute the concentration of weight away from your hips to relieve pressure and would also need to have firm enough support layers to prevent your hips from sinking in too much to keep your hip joint in neutral alignment.

Most people that don't have specific health issues and are reasonably flexible would have a fairly wide range of mattresses that they will sleep well on so finding a mattress that is inside the range that is suitable for them in terms of PPP is generally a little easier but for those that have various health issues or circumstances to deal with that are more challenging and that put them closer to the "princess and the pea" end of the range than the "I can sleep on anything" end of the range then finding a mattresses that works well for them may be more difficult because there would be fewer mattresses that they sleep well on and finding a mattress that is inside their narrower range can be a little more difficult. The basic functions of a mattress that are necessary would be the same as for anyone else ... it can just take a little bit more time and effort to find a mattress that is "just right" for you.

SallyS's suggestions are also great ones. A pillow in between your knees if you sleep on your side or a pillow under your knees if you sleep on your back can also help keep your hips inside their neutral range of motion and alignment and relieve tension in your hips and a body pillow can also help prevent "twisting" when you sleep and can also be very helpful to keep your hips inside their neutral range where muscles and ligaments are more relaxed.

There is also more about primary or "deep" support and secondary or "surface" support and their relationship to firmness and pressure relief and the "roles" of different layers in a mattress in post #2 here and in post #4 here that may also be helpful in clarifying the difference between "support" and "pressure relief" and "feel".

2: Two weeks ago, my partner and I stayed at the Grand Timber Lodge in Breckenridge, CO and fell in love with the bed there. The mattress tag said Elite Hospitality, evidently a custom made bed from Denver Mattress for high end hotels.. The specs: 13 inch, 1368 coils for a king, individually wrapped, 15.5 gauge, foam encased, 15 yr warranty. There is no trial...it's yours once they make it. My issue is an inherent distrust of the company, they don't seem to receive high ratings and I'm concerned about off-gassing and the materials that go into it plus possible sagging over time though this may be a non-issue for someone who doesn't weigh much.


While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be helpful ... I would be very cautious about about using other people's experiences or reviews on a mattress (either positive or negative) as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you and in many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (see post #13 here ).

I'm assuming that you've read the mattress shopping tutorial here but two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

While I can't speak to how any mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances ... outside of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) the most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new) so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

If you can find out the specifics of the layers and components in the Elite Hospitality and post them on the forum then I'd certainly be happy to make some comments about the quality and durability of the materials and the mattress as a whole.

I simply want a medium firmness, very low voc/offgassing/eco conscious bed that has that real cloud feel like you just don’t want to get out of the bed, ever!! Something that sleeps cool and is maybe more “nest-like” “pillowy” feeling rather than flat and unforgiving. Budget for King bed is under $2k.


There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness as well and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

There is a lot more information in post #2 here and the more detailed posts and information it links to about safe, natural, organic, "chemical free", and "green" mattresses and mattress materials that can help you sort through some of the marketing information and terminology that you will encounter in the industry and can help you differentiate between them and answer "how safe is safe enough for me" and that can help you decide on the type of materials and components you are most comfortable having in your mattress or on the certifications for harmful substances and VOC's that may be important to you. These types of issues are complex and are generally specific to each person and their individual sensitivities, circumstances, criteria, beliefs, and lifestyle choices.

While it's not possible to quantify the sleeping temperature of a mattress for any particular person with any real accuracy because there are so many variables involved including the type of mattress protector and the sheets and bedding that you use (which in many cases can have just as significant an effect on temperature as the type of foam in a mattress) and on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range and because there is no standardized testing for temperature regulation with different combinations of materials ... there is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here that can help you choose the types of materials and components that are most likely to keep you in a comfortable temperature range.

Some thoughts: Saatva Alexander Signature Winkbed…????


I can't speak to how any mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good match in terms of PPP ... you can see my comments about the quality of the materials in the Saatva and Winkbed and some of the other "simplified choice" mattresses in post #2 here and forum searches on Saatva and on Winkbed (you can just click both links) will bring up more about them as well.

The Alexander Signature Select is memory foam mattress which is in a completely different category from either the Saatva or the Winkbeds which are coil on coil mattresses (see this article about the different types of mattresses). There are some comments about the Alexander in post #2 here and in post #2 here and a forum search on Alexander (you can just click the link) will bring up more comments about it as well.

Phoenix
23 Sep 2015 06:54
  • Fabphilly
  • Fabphilly's Avatar
Hi and thanks for such a great site.

I have a 2 part question.

1, I am a small-boned woman with moderate hip arthritis, though I'm very athletic. I''m not sure if my somewhat lackluster firm foam (not memory foam) bed is making things worse or not and am wondering if any information has been compiled on what types of mattresses are best for people with hip pain?

2: Two weeks ago, my partner and I stayed at the Grand Timber Lodge in Breckenridge, CO and fell in love with the bed there. The mattress tag said Elite Hospitality, evidently a custom made bed from Denver Mattress for high end hotels.. The specs: 13 inch, 1368 coils for a king, individually wrapped, 15.5 gauge, foam encased, 15 yr warranty. There is no trial...it's yours once they make it. My issue is an inherent distrust of the company, they don't seem to receive high ratings and I'm concerned about off-gassing and the materials that go into it plus possible sagging over time though this may be a non-issue for someone who doesn't weigh much.

I simply want a medium firmness, very low voc/offgassing/eco conscious bed that has that real cloud feel like you just don’t want to get out of the bed, ever!! Something that sleeps cool and is maybe more “nest-like” “pillowy” feeling rather than flat and unforgiving. Budget for King bed is under $2k. Some thoughts: Saatva Alexander Signature , Winkbed…????

Any advice would be so so so so appreciated.
09 Sep 2015 16:36
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi RJ29,

Two are very similar:

Nest Love Bed
Brooklyn Bedding #BestMattressEver

While the third is a little different:

Nest Alexander Select

I've tried the Alexander in store (when I was on vacation, no less!) and quite liked it. I'm not sure it's worth the extra 40% cost, however.

Before I go ahead and make my purchase -- and I don't feel like I can make a bad decision here -- are there any latex mattresses made by larger retailers that might be similar to the Love Bed or the #BestMattressEver for an in-person point of comparison? I realize this might be hard to approximate, but any input is welcomed!


There is more about the 3 most important parts of "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price or course and the options you have available after a purchase)

You can see some comments about the about the Love Bed and the Best Mattress Ever and the Alexander in post #2 here that may be helpful and a forum search on best mattress ever alexander love bed (you can just click the link) will bring up all the forum posts that mention all three of them as well.

There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you are able to find another mattress that uses exactly the same materials, components, and design (which would be very unlikely) then there really isn't a way to match one mattress to another one in terms of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) based on the specifications of the mattress.

Mattress manufacturers generally try to differentiate their mattress from the mattresses made by other manufacturers and don't normally try to "match" another mattress that is made by a different manufacturer so while you may find similar mattresses that use "similar" materials or designs ... it's very unlikely that you will find another mattress that is specifically designed to "match" or "approximate" either one of the mattresses you mentioned in terms of PPP so the only way to know how two mattresses compare for you in terms of how it "feels" or in terms of firmness or PPP would be based on your own careful testing or actual sleeping experience on both of them.

When you can't test a mattress in person ... then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

I do like that the Love Bed has a 1.5" of foam in the top layer, which I think might help with motion transfer and comfort as compared to the #BestMattressEver. It might be the way to go, and the customer service at Nest has been excellent on the phone and in person (although I wonder if they're having e-mail problems with their info e-mail account again?).


I'm not so sure that the thickness of the quilting layer will have the effect you think it will since all the layers and components of a mattress (including the cover) will affect the feel and performance of all the other layers and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you have a great deal of knowledge and experience in the industry about how different types and combinations of materials feel to you in "real life" it's unlikely that you will be able to predict how a particular combination of materials that are similar to each other will feel to you or which of them would be better than the other in terms of motion separation than the other. Both the Best Mattress Ever and the Love Bed have a cover that is quilted with polyfoam and latex comfort layers (which will have a bigger effect on motion isolation than the cover).

Latex is very point elastic and is "good" for motion isolation so it's unlikely this would be an issue for most people with a mattress that uses latex comfort layers but memory foam is also better at motion isolation than latex so a mattress like the Alexander has memory foam comfort layers would probably be better at motion isolation than a mattress that has latex comfort layers. Of course it would also be a less durable choice and would have a less resilient sleeping surface and "feel" than a latex/polyfoam hybrid as well. There is more about how latex compares to memory foam in post #2 here .

Phoenix
09 Sep 2015 14:25
  • RJ29
  • RJ29's Avatar
I'm writing to follow up on my visit to Quality Sleep Shop. They were great, and had excellent service, but the mattresses I liked were simply too expensive (circa 2,000-3,000) for my budget.

With that, I've narrowed it down to a three potential choices.

Two are very similar:

Nest Love Bed
Brooklyn Bedding #BestMattressEver

While the third is a little different:

Nest Alexander Select

I've tried the Alexander in store (when I was on vacation, no less!) and quite liked it. I'm not sure it's worth the extra 40% cost, however.

Before I go ahead and make my purchase -- and I don't feel like I can make a bad decision here -- are there any latex mattresses made by larger retailers that might be similar to the Love Bed or the #BestMattressEver for an in-person point of comparison? I realize this might be hard to approximate, but any input is welcomed!

I do like that the Love Bed has a 1.5" of foam in the top layer, which I think might help with motion transfer and comfort as compared to the #BestMattressEver. It might be the way to go, and the customer service at Nest has been excellent on the phone and in person (although I wonder if they're having e-mail problems with their info e-mail account again?).
30 Aug 2015 20:31
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi tbmh,

So I'd like to run my situation by the forum and see what type of feedback I get.


I would keep in mind that the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress) or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more accurate than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial)or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness as well and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

I really love my existing setup, and I love latex so one option is to simply replicate what I have. But there are a lot of interesting options on the market - maybe I'll like something else even better. And some are at a much lower price point than what I currently have. My wife says "I like it fine but come on it's a bit too firm"


If the only change you want to make to your current mattress is to make it a little bit softer then it would make sense to choose the same layers and components as you currently have except to choose a top layer that is a little bit softer (perhaps 28 - 32 ILD) but once you have two designs that have more than a single relatively small difference between them then how the two mattresses compare for different people can be much more unpredictable and uncertain and the only way to really know how they compare for you (regardless of how they would compare for others that may have very different experiences or opinions than you) will be based on your own careful testing or personal sleeping experience.

1. Cozypure 10 inch with a firm custom layer and a Lanoodle. This one is pretty expensive! It's also customizable, so I could get my half in firm and my wife's in medium, though the split setup kind of stresses me out (how does it feel when your body spans both sides?)


There is more about the pros and cons of split layering in post #2 here .

2. Brookyln Bedding BME. Firm. I don't know the ILD of this, or whether to get the Lanoodle with it or not. The top seems to have a lot of shape to it, so I'm not sure how the Lanoodle would work


This mattress has a completely different design and uses different types of materials, different types of latex, and different layer thicknesses than the mattress you currently own so there are too many differences to really know how it will compare to your current mattress outside of your actual experience. There is more about the pros and cons of a latex/polyfoam hybrid vs an all latex mattress in post #2 here but even if you did know the ILD of each layer it wouldn't help you to predict how the mattress will compare to your current mattress or how it will feel "as a whole" partly because there are many other factors that can affect how firm or soft a mattress feels besides just ILD alone (see post #4 here ) and partly because the ILD ratings of different types and blends of latex aren't directly comparable anyway (see post #6 here ).

3. Nest Love or Alexander in firm. Again don't know whether to get the Lanoodle because the tops seem to have a lot of shape, and I don't know the firmness until I sleep with it.


Again these are both very different mattresses from the mattress you own and in the case of the Alexander it also includes memory foam which puts it in a different category again from a latex/polyfoam hybrid. There are some comments about the Alexander in post #2 here and in post #2 here .

4. Dreamfoam Aloe Alexis. Haven't heard as much about this one but it looks like a high quality mattress.


The Alexis is somewhat "in between" a more typical latex/polyfoam hybrid that only has a few inches of latex over the polyfoam and an all latex mattress that doesn't contain any polyfoam at all since it has 6" of latex in the top two layers (see post #2 here ). A forum search on Alexis (you can just click the link) will bring up more comments and feedback about it as well.

5. Replicate my existing setup, go with what I know and love. The problems: it's expensive, and my wife wants something just a bit softer.


This is the only one of the 5 that you would be able to predict reasonably closely how it will feel to you either in your current configuration or with a slightly softer top layer.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart (which would certainly include all the manufacturers or retailers you mentioned) and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

There is also more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

I am in New York City, and would love to visit showrooms and try things out for myself wherever possible. What I'd like to do is lie down on all of these and see how they feel, but I don't believe that's possible, and also I'm extremely busy


The better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the New York City area (subject to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines I linked) are listed in post #2 here but as you mentioned it's unlikely that you would find another mattress that was an exact match for any of the mattresses you mentioned in your post so while some local testing on different mattresses may give you some very general ideas about the type and combinations of materials that you tend to prefer ... it wouldn't tell you about whether any of the mattresses you are considering would be a good "match" for you in terms of PPP.

Phoenix.
30 Aug 2015 14:24
  • tbmh
  • tbmh's Avatar
I'm going from a queen size to a king size so will be purchasing a new mattress. So excited but also guaranteed to lose my mind...

I really love my existing setup, and I love latex so one option is to simply replicate what I have. But there are a lot of interesting options on the market - maybe I'll like something else even better. And some are at a much lower price point than what I currently have. My wife says "I like it fine but come on it's a bit too firm"

So I'd like to run my situation by the forum and see what type of feedback I get.

Current setup:

Bottom layer: 3 inch 45 ILD foam
Middle layer: 3 inch Talalay 36 ILD
Top layer: 3 inch Talalay 36 ILD
Topper: Lanoodle

The layers are from Foam Order , and the Lanoodle is from CozyPure . I really love this setup! It's very firm, but the Lanoodle gives it a layer of cushiness that I love. Before adding the Lanoodle, it was a little bit too firm for me. Also as I said my wife finds it a little bit too firm. I could take slightly less firm, but not much.

My options

1. Cozypure 10 inch with a firm custom layer and a Lanoodle. This one is pretty expensive! It's also customizable, so I could get my half in firm and my wife's in medium, though the split setup kind of stresses me out (how does it feel when your body spans both sides?)

2. Brookyln Bedding BME. Firm. I don't know the ILD of this, or whether to get the Lanoodle with it or not. The top seems to have a lot of shape to it, so I'm not sure how the Lanoodle would work

3. Nest Love or Alexander in firm. Again don't know whether to get the Lanoodle because the tops seem to have a lot of shape, and I don't know the firmness until I sleep with it.

4. Dreamfoam Aloe Alexis . Haven't heard as much about this one but it looks like a high quality mattress.

5. Replicate my existing setup, go with what I know and love. The problems: it's expensive, and my wife wants something just a bit softer.

I am in New York City, and would love to visit showrooms and try things out for myself wherever possible. What I'd like to do is lie down on all of these and see how they feel, but I don't believe that's possible, and also I'm extremely busy

Thanks in advance for your feedback!
27 Aug 2015 16:37
  • smk9
  • smk9's Avatar
Let me start by saying this site is amazing. Phoenix and Co. have been a huge help in deciphering the chaos and disorder of the mattress world.

My wife and I bought a pillow top about 5 years ago that was essentially new off Craigslist. While it has served us well, I had noticed over the past few months I tossed and turned excessively and constantly had pain in my lower back.

Tuft and Needle was our first move. It took a little while to adjust to the mattress but I was sleeping incredible. I prefer something a little on the firm side so after about a week I was sleeping wonderfully. My wife was never able to turn the corner, and suffered constant pain. I initiated a return with Tuft and Needle. And while I'm sad to see it go, I have been impressed by their customer service and quick/thorough responses.

My next thought was to go straight to Casper or Leesa, probably secondary to constantly being bombarded by them via advertising. I wanted something more durable and that would be in the middle of the innerspring/memory foam continuum. I have only ever lived in Florida and Texas, and I also wanted something that slept cool. Latex seemed like a good fit. With the guidance of Phoenix, I was between the Nest Love Bed and Best Mattress Ever. I settled on Brooklyn Bedding's Best Mattress Ever (BME), but was a little wary of their warranty (1.5 inches or greater indentation; most are 1 in or more.) I even pulled the trigger on it. After reading a little more, I switched at the last minute switch to Nest Bedding, for a few reasons: they've been around longer than most of the "simplified" mattress people, they are one of the few that are members of the Better Business Bureau (most haven't been around long enough to qualify), and their warranty was a little better. Plus, you're able to exchange the bed for a different level of firmness up to a year out! That seemed pretty special.

I shot an quick email to Nest on a Monday, asking when I could have the mattress by and what firmness he suggested. Mr. Alexander (Nest CEO) responded within two hours and told me I should have it by Thursday. At that point I cancelled the BME, which was handled quickly and professionally by Mario and pulled the trigger.

On Wednesday, I shot an email to Nest to see if we were still on target for Thursday as I needed an end in sight for the air mattress I've been using.. The response was quick again, but Dave noted he wasn't sure who told me that, and then explained that the mattresses took some time to produce and ship and that I'd likely see it early next week, I sent a screenshot of Mr. Alexander's email, and received an email shortly thereafter from him, apologizing for the delay explaining that the inventory was not up to date at the time he promised it would be there Thursday. AND THEN he refunded me $50. When my tracking number was finally released, I saw that it would still get here on Friday (tomorrow!)

In summation:
-- Great experience with Tuft and Needle but it was too firm for my wife
-- I ordered a Nest and their customer service is outstanding (refunded me some $ for a minor delay completely unsolicited). I have duked it out with Comcast, Allstate, and AT&T recently so direct communication and willingness to make something right is truly incredible.
-- I can't wait to sleep on my LOVE BED tomorrow night (at which point I'll update this thread.)
22 Aug 2015 18:49
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi sjk,

We aren't huge into ultra-firm mattresses, so we've been trying to focus in on some of the "millennial mattresses" that have some options on the firmness/softness - namely Brooklyn Bedding Best Mattress Ever (Medium) and the Nest Alexander (Medium). Looking for Cal King size (see my height).


There are some comments about both of these mattresses in post #2 here and in post #2 here may be helpful.

Trying to keep things below $1500 max - trying to get a decent one,, but at the same time not looking to go for the one made of albino Tibetan alpaca hair filling (i.e. the $3000+)


All of the simplified choice mattresses listed here and many of the mattresses in the other lists that are linked in the tutorial post (in the optional online step) are inside your budget range.

I would also make sure that the quality/density of the materials and components in any mattresses you are considering are suitable for your higher weight range because a material that was suitable for lower weights won't hold up over time as well for you (see the quality/durability guidelines here ).

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Also, does anyone has any recommendations for mattresses which are available from other manufacturers/retailers that are similar to the "feel" of those mattresses? Just want to make sure the foam/latex works for us (both of us have only slept on inner spring).


The first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress) or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more accurate than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or if you can't test a mattress in person then your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one but every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" and mattress manufacturers generally try to differentiate their mattress from the mattresses made by other manufacturers and don't normally try to "match" another mattress that is made by a different manufacturer. Unless a manufacturer specifically says in their description of a mattress that a similar mattress in the same general category is designed to "match" or "approximate" another one in terms of firmness or "feel" (or they are very familiar with both mattresses and can provide reliable guidance about how they compare based on the "averages" of a larger group of people) then the only reliable way to know if a mattress will "feel" similar to you would be based on your own personal testing or your actual sleeping experience.

I would also keep in mind that there are no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness (and "feel") compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness as well and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

I would also try and test a few mattresses locally that use latex in the comfort layers so that you are confident that you like the general "feel" of latex although all the simplified choice mattresses have a great return policy so you can test them in your bedroom instead of a showroom but of course can be both inconvenient and frustrating to have to return a mattress and start all over again.

If you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about any of the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

Phoenix
22 Aug 2015 12:51
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi upintheair52,

There is more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

I don't have any personal experience with either of them but you can see some comments about the Leesa Mattress along with the other "simplified choice" mattresses in post #2 here .

There are also some comments about the Alexander in post #2 here and in post #2 here .

Both of these mattresses are "somewhat" similar in that they both use more resilient foam in the top layers to provide some resilience and "spring" and ease of movement to the sleeping surface on top of a memory foam layer which adds some of the "slow response" and the slower sinking in "feel" of memory foam underneath it. The Leesa uses lower quality/density memory foam than I would be completely comfortable with (see the quality/durability guidelines here ). NOTE: The Alexander used to use Talalay latex in the top layer for the soft and firm version but now uses a combination of 4 or 5 lb memory foam in both of the top layers in all firmness levels.

Like most of the "single firmness choice" mattresses ... the Leesa is in a medium firmness range which is the firmness level that targets the widest part of the bell curve that would be suitable for the largest number of people. The Alexander has 3 firmness options which are soft, medium, and firm.

I would also keep in mind that there are no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness as well and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

When you can't test a mattress in person (and if you have more than one firmness choice or option) then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept well on and liked that they are familiar with, any special considerations you may have, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about helping you to "match" their specific mattress designs or firmness options to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences or even to other mattresses that they are familiar with than anyone else so that in combination with your own personal testing you can make the "best possible" choice with the highest chance of success.

Phoenix
30 Jul 2015 13:43
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi nm2285,

1) Nest Love is described everywhere as "springy" or "bouncy." Is it that much more so than the BME that it warrants all of the descriptions or is the difference in "springiness" a bit more subtle than that?


While both of these mattresses use latex comfort layers ... the BestMattressEver uses blended Talalay latex in the top layer (with synthetic Dunlop underneath it) and Talalay latex is generally a little more resilient or springy than Dunlop latex which is used in the Love Bed although these types of sensations are also somewhat subjective or subtle and it can also depend on the firmness of the layers and the design of the mattress. Both would have the general surface "springiness" and resilience that latex is known for. There is also more about the differences between Dunlop and Talalay in post #7 here .

2) I am 225 lb side/back sleeper that prefers slightly more firm. My wife is 140 lb side sleeper preferring medium (but has slept on firm). I gather that "medium" is probably the way to go for us? Just wanted to make sure that "medium" should be supportive enough for 225.


Medium would generally be a more average choice that would fit the widest part of the bell curve so it's generally the best choice for couples that have differences in their body types or their individual needs and preferences but when you can't test a mattress in person or you aren't confident in your firmness choice then the the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked that they are familiar with, any special considerations you may have, and the "averages" of other customers (or couples) that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs or firmness options to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences or even to other mattresses that they are familiar with than anyone else.

3) Alexander vs Love - is the Alexander just a more "refined" or "luxurious" feeling mattress or does it excel in areas of support/durability or any other significant factor over the Love? Trying to decide if it's worth justifying the extra cost.


A "luxurious feeling" is completely subjective and different people would have different definitions of how "luxurious" feels so there really isn't any way to answer this outside of your own personal experience.

Whether it would be a better or worse "match" in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) would also depend on the specifics of the person and their body type, sleeping style, and their individual preferences and sensitivities. For some people one may provide better support/alignment and for a different person the other one may provide better support/alignment.

There are a few comments about the Alexander Signature Select mattress in post #2 here that may be helpful. It uses two layers of specialty foam (4 and 5 lb memory foam) that would be more costly than the single layer of specialty foam in the Love Bed (Synthetic Dunlop latex) and for some people it may have a "feel" and less resilience or "spring" that they prefer because of the slower sinking in and deeper comfort/transition layers compared to the Love Bed ... but I would be cautious with convoluted 4 lb memory foam with higher body weights (more than the lower 200's or so) because it can soften or break down more quickly than latex and while it has nothing to do with "feel" or how well someone will sleep on a mattress or how they will like it ... I would give the durability advantage to the Love Bed (or the BestMattessEver).

There is also more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

A more detailed conversation with Nest Bedding would also be your most reliable source of guidance about which of their two mattresses would be the best "match" for both of your needs and preferences since they will be more familiar with how they compare to each other than anyone else.

Phoenix
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