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Searched for: Dormeo
03 Oct 2016 09:22
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi htuppen,

But there is one major drawback. I wake up in the middle of every night in a ball of heat and have to remove covers and changes spots until I'm cool enough to sleep again. It seems that I am a hot sleeper, but just hadn't realized this before on regular sprung beds. So now we are in a quandary as we don't want to give up the benefits of memory foam, but I don't think I can live with the heat issue.


While it's not possible to quantify or predict the sleeping temperature of a mattress for any particular person with any real accuracy because there are so many variables involved including the type of mattress protector and the sheets and bedding that you use (which in many cases can have just as significant an effect on temperature as the type of foam in a mattress) and on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range and because there is no standardized testing for temperature regulation with different combinations of materials ... there is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here that can help you choose the types of materials and components that are most likely to keep you in a comfortable temperature range.

In very general terms ... the layers and components of a sleeping system that are closer to your skin will have a bigger effect on airflow, moisture wicking, and temperature regulation than layers and components that are further away from your skin and softer mattresses will tend to be more "insulating" and tend to sleep warmer than firmer mattresses.

Most of the more modern memory foam or gel memory foam formulations will tend to be a little more breathable and sleep a little more "temperature neutral" than most of the older memory foam formulations but memory foam or gel memory foam can still tend to sleep warmer for some people (especially if you are closer to the "oven" end of the oven/iceberg range) than other types of foam materials such as polyfoam and latex (which in general is the most breathable and temperature neutral of the foam materials). Natural fibers will tend to be more temperature regulating than any type of foam.

We are still within our exchange period and have just been back to Sleep Country to discuss. The sales person was very nice but simply not knowledgeable enough to answer any detailed questions. He suggested that the Dormeo would remove the heat issue, but I am concerned that it would reintroduce too much motion transfer. We spent a long time lying on 2 of the models in the store (6700 and 8700). They are very comfortable but it was difficult to get a sense of the motion transfer as they were queen size (we have a king) and on box springs (we have a solid platform). Do you know how motion transfer compares between the Dormeo system and solid memory foam mattresses?


I'm not sure you are clear between the difference between a box spring and a foundation. A box spring has springs inside it that flex under the mattress and there are very few one sided mattresses today that use them as a support system and in many cases they will invalidate a mattress warranty. Most mattresses in the industry today need a steel or wooden bedframe with a foundation that has minimal to no flex (vs a box spring that flexes) or a platform bed which also has little to no flex under the mattress. There are many in the industry that mix up the terminology between box springs and foundations even though they are very different products.

The Dormeo mattress was almost certainly on a foundation (not a box spring) that would have little to no flex so it would feel the same or at least very similar on the foundation as it would on your your platform bed. There are so many variations between different mattresses (even if they are in the same general category) that the best way to test for motion transfer would be based on your own careful testing in the store with both of you on the mattress in the positions that you normally sleep in and with one of you bouncing a little on the mattress or getting in and out of the mattress so the other one can feel how much of their movement they can feel. Since you would probably be closer together with a queen size mattress than you would on a king ... if a mattress provides good motion isolation with a queen it will be the same or better with a king because how close together you sleep will also affect how much of the other's motion each of you will feel.

I would also be cautious with the Dormeo mattresses and make sure that you find out all the information in this article about all the layers in the mattress so you can compare them to the durability guidelines here to make sure that there are no lower quality/density materials or weak links that would compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress. I would avoid any mattress where this information isn't easily available to you from the store that sells it.

The Dormer uses lower density memory foam in the top layers than the Tempurpedic that may be a little bit more breathable and it may also be a bit more temperature regulating because of the design of the memory foam "cylinders" in the mattress but the top layers are still memory foam so it may still sleep a little warmer than you are comfortable with. Of course this is just "theory" based on the materials and on probabilities and the only way to know for certain whether any mattress will be "temperature regulating enough" in combination with the mattress protector, sheets, and bedding you use along with the temperature and humidity in your room environment will be based on your own personal experience.

Another option may be to stick with a solid memory foam bed (perhaps exchanging for a slightly firmer one to reduce the "sinky" feeling) but add a talalay latex topper to reduce the heat build up. The sales person threw up his hands in horror at this suggestion ("you can't mix materials!"), but my online research suggests that this may be an option. Do you think so?


This would certainly be an option and there is nothing inherently wrong with any combination of materials and components in a mattress because they are preference choices more than "better/worse" choices but I would be cautious with this because a topper can completely change the feel and response of a mattress. A latex topper would provide a much more resilient (springy) sleeping surface than memory foam which you may or may not like as much (you would need to test some latex to know how you like it) and it would also reduce the ability of the memory foam underneath it to warm up and soften with the heat of your body. Latex is also a little less motion isolating than memory foam. In other words they are very different materials with a completely different feel and response. There is more about the pros and cons of latex vs memory foam in post #2 here ).

While a latex top layer may improve temperature regulation because latex in general is a more breathable and temperature neutral material than memory foam ... you may end up with a mattress that doesn't work as well for you as your current mattress (outside of temperature regulation) and I would always keep in mind that the only way to know for certain whether any mattress/topper combination will be a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own personal preferences) will be based on your own personal experience on that specific combination. You could end up with a sleeping system that is better in terms of temperature regulation but worse in terms of PPP.

Do you have any other suggestions for keeping the benefits of memory foam but without the heat build up?


The more and thicker layers you put on top of memory foam the more they can affect the feel and response of the memory foam. All the layers and components in a "sleeping system" will have some effect on the feel and performance of all the other layers and components both above and below it and on the sleeping system "as a whole. In very general terms ... the properties and firmness of materials and components that are closer to the top surface of a sleeping system will tend to have a bigger effect on the overall "feel" and firmness of a mattress than materials that are deeper in the sleeping system, thicker layers will contribute more of their feel and firmness to the overall sleeping system than thinner layers, and a thinner layer would "allow" more of the feel and properties of the layer(s) and components underneath it to "come through" than thicker layers.

If you prefer the "feel" and response of memory foam over other types of materials then some less "radical" options that may help would include ...

1. I'm not sure what type of mattress protector or sheets you are using but if you are using a "thin membrane" type of protector then this may be affecting your sleeping temperature and it may be worth trying a different type of mattress protector that would be more breathable and would have less effect on the feel of the memory foam than a thicker topper. There is more about the pros and cons of different types of mattress protectors and some examples of each of them in post #89 here .

Using sheets that are made from natural fibers (such as cotton, silk, or especially flax linen) or with "semi synthetic" rayon/viscose materials (such as Tencel or bamboo) may help as well if you are currently using sheets that are made from synthetic fibers.

Reducing or changing the type of blankets or bedding you are using so that they are a little less insulating may also help keep you inside a temperature range that is comfortable for you.

Adjusting the temperature and humidity in your room may also help.

In some cases changing your pillow to a material that is more breathable and temperature regulating can also help because your head can release a significant amount of heat during the night and if your pillow retains heat then it can affect the temperature of the rest of your body as well.

Phoenix
03 Oct 2016 06:08
  • htuppen
  • htuppen's Avatar
Hi,

What an amazing forum! Like several others, I wish I had discovered it earlier!

We recently bought a Tempurpedic Cloud Breeze 2 Supreme from Sleep Country. (Yes, I realize now that we overpaid!) Our main concern was reducing motion transfer as I am a very light sleeper. And in this respect, the bed has been amazing. I barely notice when my husband rolls over. It is also very comfortable. The sales person pushed us towards the highest end softest version and, having overcome my initial aversion to the "sinky" feeling, I really do now find it a very comfortable bed. In particular, I can sleep on my back all night without any lower back issues - a first for me.

But there is one major drawback. I wake up in the middle of every night in a ball of heat and have to remove covers and changes spots until I'm cool enough to sleep again. It seems that I am a hot sleeper, but just hadn't realized this before on regular sprung beds. So now we are in a quandary as we don't want to give up the benefits of memory foam, but I don't think I can live with the heat issue.

We are still within our exchange period and have just been back to Sleep Country to discuss. The sales person was very nice but simply not knowledgeable enough to answer any detailed questions. He suggested that the Dormeo would remove the heat issue, but I am concerned that it would reintroduce too much motion transfer. We spent a long time lying on 2 of the models in the store (6700 and 8700). They are very comfortable but it was difficult to get a sense of the motion transfer as they were queen size (we have a king) and on box springs (we have a solid platform). Do you know how motion transfer compares between the Dormeo system and solid memory foam mattresses?

Another option may be to stick with a solid memory foam bed (perhaps exchanging for a slightly firmer one to reduce the "sinky" feeling) but add a talalay latex topper to reduce the heat build up. The sales person threw up his hands in horror at this suggestion ("you can't mix materials!"), but my online research suggests that this may be an option. Do you think so?

Do you have any other suggestions for keeping the benefits of memory foam but without the heat build up?

Thank you in advance for your help!

Harriet
03 Sep 2016 18:52
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Rollins2016,

I was able to get the refund, even though it was quite a hassle.


That's good to hear.

I also got this info about the layers from Doremo
1.TOP LAYER: Phase Change Material on the top of a Supreme AirCool Memory Foam Comfort layer with gel and air pockets to give it more responsiveness and coolness than traditional memory foam.

2. MIDDLE LAYERS: Two Octaspring layers below the Comfort Layer
- the first layer is NOT foam encased because it needs to breathe to aide in temperature control
- the second Octaspring Layer is foam encased for added support

3. BOTTOM LAYER: Firm foam Support Core


As you probably know from the previous replies in the topic ... this doesn't contain any meaningful information that would be helpful to you because it's missing the thickness and density of the foam layers which is the information that you really need to know.

Ended up purchasing tonfurniture.com/omega-latex/


Hopefully you were able to find out all the information that you need to know to confirm that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the Omega mattress either but assuming that you did ... congratulations on your new mattress :)

Phoenix
03 Sep 2016 18:42
  • Rollins2016
  • Rollins2016's Avatar
I am back! Ended up purchasing tonfurniture.com/omega-latex/

I was able to get the refund, even though it was quite a hassle.
I also got this info about the layers from Doremo
1.TOP LAYER: Phase Change Material on the top of a Supreme AirCool Memory Foam Comfort layer with gel and air pockets to give it more responsiveness and coolness than traditional memory foam.

2. MIDDLE LAYERS: Two Octaspring layers below the Comfort Layer
- the first layer is NOT foam encased because it needs to breathe to aide in temperature control
- the second Octaspring Layer is foam encased for added support

3. BOTTOM LAYER: Firm foam Support Core
29 Aug 2016 14:06
  • Rollins2016
  • Rollins2016's Avatar
Thanks!

I will check out foamite as that is the store nearest to us
29 Aug 2016 12:38
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Rollins2016,

I am back with good news! Turns out I can refund it before its shipped (next Tues)

I will most likely do that because we are on a tighter budget.


I would agree that's good news ... especially if they aren't able to provide you with all the information you need about the density of all the layers and components in the mattress.

Phoneix, any recommendations for a firmer memory foam bed (queen) around Richmond Hill, ON?


Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent (see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Toronto, ON area are listed in post #1 here .

I don't keep a record of the individual mattresses or their specs that the retailers and manufacturers in the hundreds of forum lists throughout the forum carry on their floor or have available online (it would be a bigger job than anyone could keep up with in a constantly changing market) but checking their websites and making some preliminary phone calls to the retailers/manufacturers that are on the local lists is always a good idea before you decide on which retailers or manufacturers you wish to deal with anyway. This will tell you which of them carry mattresses that would meet your specific criteria, are transparent about the materials in their mattresses, and that carry the type of mattresses that you are interested in that are also in the budget range you are comfortable with. Once you have checked their websites and/or talked with the ones that interest you then you will be in a much better position to decide on the ones that you are most interested in considering or visiting based on the results of your preliminary research and conversations.

Phoenix
29 Aug 2016 12:23
  • Rollins2016
  • Rollins2016's Avatar
I am back with good news! Turns out I can refund it before its shipped (next Tues)

I will most likely do that because we are on a tighter budget.

Phoneix, any recommendations for a firmer memory foam bed (queen) around Richmond Hill, ON?

Thank you so much!
29 Aug 2016 12:05
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Fisherbrains,

Part of our challenge is the dearth of obvious "smaller" shops in the Vancouver, British Columbia area and the (over?)abundance of the standard manufacturers as well as Kingsdown which appears to have the same or worse quality issues as the rest.


Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent (see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around Vancouver, BC are listed in post #2 here .

Occasionally there's a "lifestyle" mattress shop like www.myessentia.com featuring an organic mattress solution which while altruistic sets off warning bells in my head as well as dizziness at to the >$3000 price points (we're looking for a king).


There are some comments about Essentia and some of the misleading claims they make and some forum discussions with them (as well as some of the FTC issues they have had about their claims) in this thread and this thread and posts #3 and #4 here ). Some of the discussion in this topic may be helpful as well. I certainly wouldn't treat the information on their website (or on some of the other websites I've seen that write about them either) as a reliable source of "fact based" information and I would also make some very careful "value" comparisons before considering any Essentia mattress because they do tend to be in a higher budget range than other mattresses that use similar materials.

Phoenix
29 Aug 2016 11:56
  • Fishferbrains
  • Fishferbrains's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,
I'm catching up in reading the tutorials, etc as we go. B)

Part of our challenge is the dearth of obvious "smaller" shops in the Vancouver, British Columbia area and the (over?)abundance of the standard manufacturers as well as Kingsdown which appears to have the same or worse quality issues as the rest. Occasionally there's a "lifestyle" mattress shop like www.myessentia.com featuring an organic mattress solution which while altruistic sets off warning bells in my head as well as dizziness at to the >$3000 price points (we're looking for a king).

Any local suggestions would be appreciated!
29 Aug 2016 11:40
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Fisherbrains,

What worries me is exactly how little clear information exists on *this* model vs what's on the Dormeo website directly.


The Dormeo website also doesn't contain any meaningful information about the density of the polyfoam and memory foam layers and components in their mattresses either so you would need to find out all the information here to confirm there are no lower quality materials or weak links that could compromise the durability or useful life of any of their mattresses ... not just the models that are sold at Sleep Country.

As a risk taker I'm willing to look at any of the online latex and/or memory foam retailers, but there's not a ton of guidance out there for us to follow.


I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

If you are considering online options then the mattress shopping tutorial includes several links to lists of many of the better online options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) that include many different types and categories of mattresses that use different materials and components in a wide range of designs, budgets, firmness levels, and with different return/exchange policies that may be well worth considering.

There may also be some good options available to you locally that you can test in person before a purchase and if you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area as well.

Phoenix
29 Aug 2016 11:18
  • Fishferbrains
  • Fishferbrains's Avatar
What worries me is exactly how little clear information exists on *this* model vs what's on the Dormeo website directly. We didn't evaluate clearly our return options (should we take delivery) and all of this basically has spooked both of us for this level of investment.

As a risk taker I'm willing to look at any of the online latex and/or memory foam retailers, but there's not a ton of guidance out there for us to follow.
28 Aug 2016 20:53
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Fisherbrains,

While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular store or business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress so I would be very cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

There is more about the 3 most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

A good retailer that is transparent about the materials and components in their mattress should be able to easily provide you with all the information you need about the quality and durability of the materials and components in a mattress to make an informed choice but if for any reason the retailer you are dealing with is either unwilling or unable to provide you with all the information you need to to confirm there are no lower quality/density materials or weak links in any mattress you are considering then I would avoid the mattress completely because the risk of premature foam softening and breakdown that leads to the loss of comfort and/or support and the need to replace the mattress much too quickly would be too high.

Phoenix
28 Aug 2016 20:29
  • Fishferbrains
  • Fishferbrains's Avatar
I'm very interested in the review from Rollins2016 as we too just placed a "fully refundable" deposit (not full payment) on the Dormeo 6700.

I wanted to do more research when I got home and this is the only place where I've seen the 6700 referenced.

Rollins2016 - Please let us know your experience!

FishMan
23 Aug 2016 23:05
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Rollins2016,

This is the only video I found with some info. www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFvHtjK7nxw
Wish they were more transparent.


Unfortunately the video doesn't contain any meaningful information about the density and durability of the layers and components in the mattress.

There are a few comments about the previous Octaspring 9500 in post #2 here which was somewhat similar although I believe it had one additional ecocell layer but I don't know the specifics of the current line so you would need to call Dormeo and ask them for the thickness and density of each of the layers in the mattress because it's unlikely that Sleep Country will provide you with the information you need to make an informed choice. It's also possible that Dormeo may not provide it either.

If you can find out the thickness and density of all the layers and components in the 6700 and post them on the forum I'd be happy let you know if there are any lower quality materials or weak links that would be a reason for concern.

I know that once you've purchased a mattress that Sleep Country only allows exchanges and doesn't have a return/refund policy but I'm not sure if you are able to cancel an order with Sleep Country if it hasn't been delivered. If you can return it for a refund I would avoid buying any mattress if there are lower quality/density or any "unknown density" materials in the mattress that would be a reason for concern in terms of the durability and useful life of the mattress.

Phoenix
23 Aug 2016 22:35
  • Rollins2016
  • Rollins2016's Avatar
This is the only video I found with some info.
Wish they were more transparent.
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: youtube.com/watch?v=AFvHtjK7nxw

I have not received the mattress yet. I went with my fiancee to try the bed at sleep country. It seemed comfortable to us, but that was only based on our initial try.,
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