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Searched for: Dormeo
30 Apr 2015 22:11
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi mgaines,

They were called the "Dreamy" or "Heavenly". I have bad back problems (3 bulging discs and sciatica) and the hubby is starting to have back problems too. I didn't buy it because I like to do my research, but like most of you, I couldn't really find much information about this brand. However, what I have noticed is that you guys use numbers for the models. I'm trying to figure out the difference and get more info.


The Dormeo Dreamy and Heavenly mattresses are different from the Dormeo mattresses listed on the Dormeo site and instead of using "polyfoam ecocells" for support they use a pocket coil for the support core instead.

There is more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here that can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between different mattresses you are considering but the most important part of "value" of a mattress purchase is always comfort and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) which you will be able to assess with your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial).

Outside of PPP a mattress is only as good as its construction and the quality and durability of the materials inside it and the durability and useful lifetime of a mattress is also one of the most important parts of the value of a mattress. No matter how it may feel in a showroom ... there would be little value in buying a mattress where the use of lower quality and less durable materials leads to foam softening and the loss of comfort and support much too quickly after a purchase and foam softening and the loss of comfort and support isn't considered to be a defect and isn't covered by a mattress warranty (see post #174 here ). The information you need to assess the durability of a mattress is listed in this article .

The materials and components in the Dreamy that they have listed on their site (and my comments about them) are ...

1.5" 3-Pound Memory Foam Comfort layer: While this is a lower quality/density memory foam ... it's only 1.5" thick so it would still be inside the quality/durability guidelines here and wouldn't be an obvious weak link in the mattress.

3-zoned, 2" Memory Foam MemoryCoils: In their other mattresses this is a 5 lb memory foam which is a high quality and durable material but I would confirm that it's the same density in this mattress as well.

.75" Ecocell Support Layer: In their other mattresses this is 2.5 lb - 3.5 lb polyfoam and if they are the same in this mattress it would also be a high quality and durable material.

8" 15 and 16 gauge Wrapped Coils in 3-zones. 16 gauge foam encased edge support for additional support and airflow for cool comfort with durable stability: This is also a good quality component and the support core of a mattress isn't normally the weakest link in a mattress anyway (a mattress will tend to soften, impress, or break down from the top layers down).

.75" Ecocell Support Layer: Same comments as the other Ecocell layer.

I would want to confirm the density of all the foam layers with Sit N Sleep but if these specs are correct then there wouldn't be any obvious weak link in this mattress in terms of the quality and durability of the materials.


The materials and components in the Heavenly that they have listed on their site (along with my comments as well) are ...

2" Buoyant Talalay Latex Pillow Top: This is a very high quality material and Talalay latex is among the most durable foam materials in the industry.
1.5" 5-Pound Memory Foam Comfort layer: This is also a high quality/density and durable material.

3-zoned, 2" Memory Foam MemoryCoils:
.75" Ecocell Support Layer:
8" 15 and 16 gauge Wrapped Coils in 3-zones. 16 gauge foam encased edge support for additional support and airflow for cool comfort with durable stability
.75" Ecocell Support Layer: All the bottom 4 layers and components would be the same as the Dreamy mattress.

I would also want to confirm the density of all the foam layers in the Heavenly mattress with Sit N Sleep but if these specs are correct then there also wouldn't be any obvious weak link in this mattress in terms of the quality and durability of the materials (and since the memory foam layer is 5 lb instead of 3 and with the Talalay latex it would be more durable than the Dreamy mattress).

If you have tested these mattresses and have confirmed that either one or both of them are a good match for you in terms of PPP and confirmed the density of the foam materials then in terms of the quality/durability of the materials they would be worth considering if they also compare well to your other finalists based on PPP and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

I couldn't really find much information about this brand.


There is more information about Dormeo in post #2 here and the posts it links to along with the rest of the same topic and the topic we are posting in.

I'm trying to figure out the difference and get more info.


Hopefully this has help you decide about whether to include the Dreamy and/or the Heavenly in your "finalists".

I hope you've also had the chance to read the mattress shopping tutorial which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines you will need to make the best possible choice and just in case you haven't seen it yet ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Greater Los Angeles area (subject to the quality/value guidelines I linked) are also listed in post #2 here and it would probably be well worth visiting a few of the other retailers/manufacturers that are close enough to you as well so that you are confident that any mattress you choose is the most suitable, the most durable, and the best "value" choice that is available to you.

Phoenix
30 Apr 2015 20:55
  • mgaines
  • mgaines's Avatar
Hello. I created an account because I am mattress shopping and came across the Dormeo brand at Sit n Sleep in CA. I went there because we bought out last mattress there (over 12 years ago) and got great service. Plus, they would have many brands and models to try. The Dormeo models they had were not numbered. They were called the "Dreamy" or "Heavenly". I have bad back problems (3 bulging discs and sciatica) and the hubby is starting to have back problems too. I didn't buy it because I like to do my research, but like most of you, I couldn't really find much information about this brand. However, what I have noticed is that you guys use numbers for the models. I'm trying to figure out the difference and get more info.
28 Apr 2015 11:34
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi France,

I almost bought the Dormeo Octaspring 5500, but after reading really bad reviews, I don't know if it's a good idea:
questionrs.com/tube/ E2yCuSl6E3I/dormeo-octaspring- review-6500-mattress-6-months- old-real-customer

http://www.reviews-mattress. com/dormeo-octaspring-reviews. html
Etc.


I would be cautious about using other people's reviews or experiences on a mattress (either positive or negative) as a reliable source of information or guidance about how suitable a mattress may be for you or the durability of a mattress and in many cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person may be completely unsuitable for someone else either in terms of suitability and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) or in terms of durability (see post #13 here ). Reviews about the knowledge or service at a particular store can certainly be helpful but when it comes to the specifics of a mattress they won't provide you with the type of reliable information you will need to make an informed choice about how well you will sleep on a mattress, how long you will sleep well, or the "value" of a mattress purchase compared to all the other options that are available to you either in your area or online.

Now, I'm really not sure if what should buy:
- a Zbed (www.matelasbonheur.ca/ en/zedbed-snowpedic-gravite. html),
- a Green Sleep: www.matelasbonheur.ca/ en/pure-comfort-green-sleep. html
- a Dormeo: www.dormezvous.com/ products/tabid/131/products/ 280/mattresses/dormeo- octaspring-5500/language/en- us/default.aspx


Two of the more important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress that is the best "match" for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for that are involved in each of them and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability, durability, and value.

The most important part of "value" of a mattress purchase is comfort and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) which you will be able to assess with your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) but outside of PPP a mattress is only as good as its construction and the quality and durability of the materials inside it and the durability and useful lifetime of a mattress is also a very important part of the value of a mattress. No matter how it may feel in a showroom ... there would be little value in buying a mattress where the use of lower quality and less durable materials leads to foam softening and the loss of comfort and support much too quickly after a purchase and foam softening and the loss of comfort and support isn't considered to be a defect and isn't covered by a mattress warranty (see post #174 here ). The information you need to assess the durability of a mattress is listed in this article .

Zbed doesn't list the specifics of the materials in the Snowpedic description so if you can find out the specifics of the type and density of all the foam layers and post it on the forum I'd be happy to make some comments about the quality and durability of the materials. Without this information it's not possible for me to make any meaningful comments about the quality or durability of the materials in a mattress.

The Green Sleep Pure Comfort uses high quality materials (100% natural Dunlop) and there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress so it would certainly be a durable choice although it's also in a higher budget range than other latex mattresses that may also be suitable for you so I would make sure you make some careful value comparisons based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

There is more information and comments about the Dormeo Octaspring mattresses in post #2 here and the posts it links to but I would make sure you confirm the thickness and density of all the foam layers before a purchase and I would also make some careful "value" comparisons with this mattress as well.

I also heard about Essentia store...


You can read some of my thoughts about Essentia and some of the misleading claims they make and some forum discussions with them in this thread and this thread and posts #3 and #4 here ). Needless to say I would be very cautious here.

After reading your tutorial and articles, I think I'd rather go with a latex mattress. Do you think you can give me an advice?


I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion about which mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) based on specs (either yours or a mattress) or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more accurate than your own personal testing or sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

The best advice I can provide is to follow the 5 steps in the mattress shopping tutorial one at a time which will give you the best possible chance of finding a mattress that is the most suitable, the most durable, and the best "value" for you based on all the criteria that are most important to you. Of course if you have any specific questions along the way that I can help with or if you are given some information that needs a "fact check" then I'm certainly happy to answer them to the best of my ability as well.

Once you are at step 3 in the tutorial then the better options and possibilities I'm aware of in the Montreal area (subject to the quality/value guidelines I linked earlier) are listed in post #276 here .

A forum search on Montreal (you can just click the link) will also bring up more comments and feedback from other members in the area that may be helpful as well.

Phoenix
28 Apr 2015 09:28
  • France
  • France's Avatar
Hi,
I live in Montréal (Québec). I'm looking to buy a new mattress, but after going in many stores, trying latex and memory foam beds, readings reviews... I'm more indecise than at the beginning!

I almost bought the Dormeo Octaspring 5500, but after reading really bad reviews, I don't know if it's a good idea:
questionrs.com/tube/ E2yCuSl6E3I/dormeo-octaspring- review-6500-mattress-6-months- old-real-customer

http://www.reviews-mattress. com/dormeo-octaspring-reviews. html
Etc.

Now, I'm really not sure if what should buy:
- a Zbed (www.matelasbonheur.ca/ en/zedbed-snowpedic-gravite. html),
- a Green Sleep: www.matelasbonheur.ca/ en/pure-comfort-green-sleep. html
- a Dormeo: www.dormezvous.com/ products/tabid/131/products/ 280/mattresses/dormeo- octaspring-5500/language/en- us/default.aspx

or something else.

I also heard about Essentia store...

I'm 5'3'' and 107 pounds.

After reading your tutorial and articles, I think I'd rather go with a latex mattress. Do you think you can give me an advice?

Thank you so much!
15 Apr 2015 12:56
  • phewd
  • phewd's Avatar

I'm not sure how deep the "hump" in the middle was in either of your mattresses but it certainly shouldn't be happening that quickly to any significant degree. The three most common reasons for this would be either low quality/density foams in the upper layers of the mattress, an issue in the foundation under the mattress, or a defect in the mattress (the foam could be shifting or "bunching" in the middle of the mattress). In some cases it can be more than one reason and higher weights can make these types of issues show up more quickly.

The foundation issue would be more common with a king size which uses two twin XL foundations put together so the middle where the two foundations meet would be very firm and if your foundations have any flex then the support under each side would be softer. Your foundation could also have a dip or impression which would show up in the sleeping surface of the mattress. You can try your mattress on the floor to see if it makes any difference. Of course it's always possible that both of your mattresses were defective as well but this is less likely if the same issue happens twice in such a short time.


The foundations we receieved were the ones that are sold in set with the iComfort mattress. So, maybe not the most high 'quality' foundations, they should be able to handle most mattress (I would expect). I'm inclined to think the iComfort was a quality issue (there weren't 'impressions' in the iComfort, but a very noticeable difference in support between the sides and the middle, and it felt like a 'mountain' when we finally finished sinking into our sides and attempted to roll towards the middle) and the Restonic a possible defect (3 weeks for visible impressions is completely unacceptable, regardless of our weight - which, for the record is 250 and 195).

There is more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here that can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between them.

If the impressions in your Restonic are greater than the warranty exclusion then you would have a warranty issue and you could qualify for a warranty exchange rather than a comfort exchange and I would talk to the store about this.


Thanks for the link - I will take a gander and then make the wife take a look. She's the one that got us into this mess in the first place! ;) We will resort to a warranty inspection as a last resort if we can't figure something else out. Considering that our mattress may very well be defective and the showroom model offering infinitely more support, it could be viable and cost-effective (though the wife is completely taken with memory foam, not so much with latex).

I would be very cautious with any of the Serta mattresses because they tend to use some lower quality/density materials which will have a much greater risk of softening or developing premature impressions over time than a mattress that uses higher quality/density materials. I would always make sure that you know the type and quality of all the materials and layers in any mattress you are considering (see this article and the guidelines it links to) so you can make sure that there aren't any lower quality materials that would be a weak link in the mattress. I would avoid any mattress that uses too much lower quality density materials that aren't suitable for your weight range or where you aren't able to find out the quality/density of the materials inside it regardless of how it may feel in a showroom.


Even with the mountains of testimonials and warnings provided by this site against the purchase of the Serta mattress, we still got seduced by the showroom model and thought that there might be a chance our experience would be different. It wasn't. It's not that the mattress wasn't extremely comfortable even after 60 days and the breakdown of the material on the sides (and not the middle) - it's just that this breakdown seemed to occur so quickly, much more so than expected. So we'll be staying away from Serta after a lesson learned.

In very general terms Tempurpedic uses higher quality/density materials than most of the Serta Mattresses and don't have any obvious weak links in their design but I would also be cautious here because if you are in higher than average weight ranges then they do have some mattresses that use 4 lb memory foam which would be fine for someone that in a lower weight range but may not maintain comfort/support for those that are in higher weight ranges for nearly as long. I would tend to reduce or minimize the use of 4 lb memory foam in higher weight ranges so it would depend on the specifics of the mattress you are considering.

There is some information and guidelines about choosing a mattress for those in higher weight ranges in post #3 here and the posts it links to that will be helpful.


I will most certainly be looking at this link - thank you! In fact, the Tempurpedic model we're looking at (Tempur Cloud Supreme Breeze), I believe, uses 4lb foam in the first 2" of the comfort layer (the Tempur-ES foam) followed by 2" of the 5lb foam and then the "regular" polyfoam as the base. We're still taken with it, but leery of the possibility of the 4lb foam being 'weak'. (However, considering 4lb is at least twice the density of the foams used in the other beds we've tried, it seems like something we might be able to overlook?)

Like many of the members that have come here that have been in a similar situation, you are in a somewhat difficult position where you need to exchange a mattress at a store that sells many mattresses that I would normally suggest avoiding and where there may not be any particularly good quality/value options available to you.

There are some suggestions and ideas in post #2 here about the two main strategies that you can use in your situation that can help you make the best of a difficult situation.


...and another reference that will be amazingly useful, so thank you!

This would be one of the strategies that can certainly help you make the best of a difficult situation but the goal is more to minimize the use of lower quality materials as much as possible (which generally means choosing a firmer mattress) rather than finding a mattress that has "more" higher quality materials because a mattress is only as durable as its weakest link no matter how much higher quality materials it may include.


So, would it make sense to look at a lower-profile, firmer foam mattress (do they make any thinner than 9"?) and then throwing a 2-3" high-density foam topper on top of that? And does 'firm' usually denote a quality material? Do you have some examples of what you'd consider a firmer quality mattress that would be cost effective?

The foam quality/density guidelines in the previous link will help you know whether any mattress you are considering has any weak links in the design. Of course this is also dependent on the retailer you are dealing with being willing and able to provide you with the information you need to make an informed choice. I would treat "unknown density" materials in the same way as "low quality" materials.


I tend to concur with the 'unknown = low' measure of quality.

Tempurpedic doesn't normally provide the specs of the materials in their mattresses any longer but you can see the specs of the Cloud Supreme Breeze in post #2 here .

I would keep in mind (just in case you are trying to "match" one of the Tempurpedic mattresses based on foam densities) that while density is the most important factor in the durability of a foam material, it doesn't indicate the properties of the material so other memory foams or polyfoams that are the same density may not have the same feel or firmness or other properties as the foams in the Tempurpedic. There is more about the different properties of different types of memory foam in post #9 here and post #8 here .


At this point, the option for us to 'beat' is just purchasing the Tempurpedic, which was intially what we wanted to avoid (because of the price) but we have inadvertantly backed ourselves into a corner in which we try to finagle a quality setup by trying to piece something together (with very limited choices) or we just suck it up and drop the extra $$ for the Tempur. *Sigh* Sucks to be us.

Thank you for your input/links/advice/support. I really appreciate it - it'll help us try to make the best of a bad situation...
15 Apr 2015 11:33
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi phewd,

We pulled the trigger on a Serta iComfort Savant Plush. We sleep in a King bed and we're not spooners/cuddlers and pretty much stay on 'our sides' of the bed. After about 60 days, we got the 'hump' in the middle of the bed and our body impressions were starting to become readily apparent. When one of us got up, the other would move to the center of the bed to try and break it down like our 'sides' to make it less of an issue but it was futile. We were not happy with the mattress after only 60 days of use, so we went back and did a 'swap'. (For a $150 restock fee, you can 'upgrade' to any mattress in the store.)

We ended up trying the Restonic all Latex mattress (I don't recall the actual 'model', but it was their 'mid' level latex. It didn't seem to be as 'bouncy'/'responsive' as the other latex mattresses we tried and we thought it might be more durable than the memory foam mattress we had just returned. However, that' hump and impressions were even MORE apparent after only 3 WEEKS of use! Plus my wife was saying that she woke up feeling the same way as she felt waking up on our 9-year-old innerspring mattress.

Now, I know we're heavier people, which matters. I also understand that the 'hump' is expected at some point because of our sleep habits and the inability to flip the mattress over. We can rotate it 180 degress, but not 90 because it's not square. But to get such a pronounced hump in both mattresses in such a short amount of time was very disappointing to us.


I'm not sure how deep the "hump" in the middle was in either of your mattresses but it certainly shouldn't be happening that quickly to any significant degree. The three most common reasons for this would be either low quality/density foams in the upper layers of the mattress, an issue in the foundation under the mattress, or a defect in the mattress (the foam could be shifting or "bunching" in the middle of the mattress). In some cases it can be more than one reason and higher weights can make these types of issues show up more quickly.

The foundation issue would be more common with a king size which uses two twin XL foundations put together so the middle where the two foundations meet would be very firm and if your foundations have any flex then the support under each side would be softer. Your foundation could also have a dip or impression which would show up in the sleeping surface of the mattress. You can try your mattress on the floor to see if it makes any difference. Of course it's always possible that both of your mattresses were defective as well but this is less likely if the same issue happens twice in such a short time.

So, the main problem that we are currently faced with is that we are either stuck with the mattress (Restonic) that we currently have, or we can 'exchange' it again for the $150 fee for any mattress in the store (but if we get a cheaper mattress, we're still on the hook for the same price we paid for the Restonic - no difference refunds). My wife was extremely satisfied with the 'feel' of the Serta memory foam mattress so we're thinking of going that route again, but we're concerned that we may have the same problem with any of the memory foam mattresses they have. Are the Tempurpedic beds better quality? To justify the price tag? We might be able to get into a 'floor model' for just a small price increase, but otherwise, we're at a loss as to what we should pursue. We may actually end up looking at innerspring or innerspring hybrids.


There is more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here that can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between them.

If the impressions in your Restonic are greater than the warranty exclusion then you would have a warranty issue and you could qualify for a warranty exchange rather than a comfort exchange and I would talk to the store about this.

I would be very cautious with any of the Serta mattresses because they tend to use some lower quality/density materials which will have a much greater risk of softening or developing premature impressions over time than a mattress that uses higher quality/density materials. I would always make sure that you know the type and quality of all the materials and layers in any mattress you are considering (see this article and the guidelines it links to) so you can make sure that there aren't any lower quality materials that would be a weak link in the mattress. I would avoid any mattress that uses too much lower quality density materials that aren't suitable for your weight range or where you aren't able to find out the quality/density of the materials inside it regardless of how it may feel in a showroom.

Are the Tempurpedic beds better quality? To justify the price tag? We might be able to get into a 'floor model' for just a small price increase, but otherwise, we're at a loss as to what we should pursue. We may actually end up looking at innerspring or innerspring hybrids.


In very general terms Tempurpedic uses higher quality/density materials than most of the Serta Mattresses and don't have any obvious weak links in their design but I would also be cautious here because if you are in higher than average weight ranges then they do have some mattresses that use 4 lb memory foam which would be fine for someone that in a lower weight range but may not maintain comfort/support for those that are in higher weight ranges for nearly as long. I would tend to reduce or minimize the use of 4 lb memory foam in higher weight ranges so it would depend on the specifics of the mattress you are considering.

There is some information and guidelines about choosing a mattress for those in higher weight ranges in post #3 here and the posts it links to that will be helpful.

Does anyone have any suggestions, 'cause I'm at a loss. I'm having serious buyer's remorse because now we're stuck with this company and they don't seem to have anything we're comfortable buying any more. Does anyone have any experience working with Mattress Matters? I wonder if they wouldn't work a company they don't display so they could get a 'wholesale' price and take the profit? I just don't know what to do anymore....


Like many of the members that have come here that have been in a similar situation, you are in a somewhat difficult position where you need to exchange a mattress at a store that sells many mattresses that I would normally suggest avoiding and where there may not be any particularly good quality/value options available to you.

There are some suggestions and ideas in post #2 here about the two main strategies that you can use in your situation that can help you make the best of a difficult situation.

Reading through some of these boards, it looks like we might be able to finagle a workable solution - get a new bed that has more quality materials but may not necessarily feel exactly what we are looking for, and modify with a topper (like Brooklyn Bedding's 5lb memory foam topper).


This would be one of the strategies that can certainly help you make the best of a difficult situation but the goal is more to minimize the use of lower quality materials as much as possible (which generally means choosing a firmer mattress) rather than finding a mattress that has "more" higher quality materials because a mattress is only as durable as its weakest link no matter how much higher quality materials it may include.

However, what would be considered 'quality' in the more bigger brands (which is what Mattress Matters appears to be retailers of) so we can try them?


The foam quality/density guidelines in the previous link will help you know whether any mattress you are considering has any weak links in the design. Of course this is also dependent on the retailer you are dealing with being willing and able to provide you with the information you need to make an informed choice. I would treat "unknown density" materials in the same way as "low quality" materials.

Also, I've heard that the 5lb foam tends to be hotter than the 4lb - is this true?


This is often true in very general terms if you are comparing whole categories of memory foam but it may not be true with specific types of memory foam that are in the same density range because some memory foams are more breathable, more responsive, more temperature sensitive, or firmer than others in the same density and all of these properties can have an effect on sleeping temperature and can vary between different types of memory foam. There are also many other variables that besides just the foam used in a mattress (such as the mattress protector you use or your sheets and bedding) that can also have a significant effect sleeping temperature if you tend to be more towards the "oven" end of the oven to iceberg range.

In other words there are some memory foam designs and materials that will sleep cooler than others so depending on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range, the specific design of a memory foam mattress, and the type of memory foam it uses, and on the type of mattress protector and sheets you use, you may find that you will be OK on some memory foam mattresses in terms of sleeping temperature even if you tend to sleep warmer on others. There is more about cooling down memory foam in post #6 here and there is more about the many variables that can affect temperature regulation in post #2 here and the posts it links to. A knowledgeable and experienced manufacturer/retailer that has your best interests at heart such as Dreamfoam will be able to tell you more about how their specific memory foams compare to others on the market.

Also, I can't find construction specs for the Tempurpedic Cloud Supreme Breeze. That was our #1 that set us off on this journey but it priced us out. I read a dubiously-sourced article that said it was 2" of 4lb density on top, then 2" of 5lb density, but that still leaves at least 7" unaccounted for.


Tempurpedic doesn't normally provide the specs of the materials in their mattresses any longer but you can see the specs of the Cloud Supreme Breeze in post #2 here .

I would keep in mind (just in case you are trying to "match" one of the Tempurpedic mattresses based on foam densities) that while density is the most important factor in the durability of a foam material, it doesn't indicate the properties of the material so other memory foams or polyfoams that are the same density may not have the same feel or firmness or other properties as the foams in the Tempurpedic. There is more about the different properties of different types of memory foam in post #9 here and post #8 here .

Phoenix
14 Apr 2015 08:51
  • charlestonbedding
  • charlestonbedding's Avatar
Mercador,

I am curious......... when your mattress arrived, was it vacuum packed? (no air)
If not, what delivery company was it?
Was that a Queen Size mattress?
Thanks!
14 Apr 2015 05:31
  • Mercador
  • Mercador's Avatar
13 Apr 2015 21:02
  • rolex
  • rolex's Avatar
Excellent to know - thank you for the first hand experience. What size did you buy?
13 Apr 2015 17:56
  • Mercador
  • Mercador's Avatar
Hi Rolex,

Got my Dormeo since 2 months now and still like it. It's not warm like a Tempur.

As Phoenix said, we can't say for durability for several years but by now, I'm happy with my purchase (made at Sleeping Country or whatever is called in English ;) )
13 Apr 2015 17:47
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi rolex,

I would definitely like to hear your recommendations. I am located in Brampton, ON. Postal code L6Y 1N7


The better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the GTA region including Brampton (and subject to the quality/value guidelines here ) are listed in post #1 here .

Phoenix
13 Apr 2015 17:24
  • rolex
  • rolex's Avatar
I would definitely like to hear your recommendations. I am located in Brampton, ON. Postal code L6Y 1N7

Thanks again
13 Apr 2015 16:18
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi rolex,

I guess what I'm ultimately asking is, does anybody have any current opinions now that some time has gone by since the last response?


Their mattresses haven't changed in terms of their materials or designs since the later replies in this topic and in post #2 and the rest of this topic as well so my thoughts about them would still be the same.

Any owners out there that can attest to how their bed is holding up?


They haven't been on the market for long enough for anyone to be able to really be able to make any meaningful comments about their durability based on actual experience. I would also be very cautious about using other people's experiences or reviews on a mattress (either positive or negative) as a reliable source of information or guidance about how suitable or how durable a mattress or any specific material may be for you and in many cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on either in terms of suitability or durability (see post #13 here ).

Outside of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) ... a mattress is only as good as it's construction and the quality/durability of the materials inside it regardless of the specific mattress or the name of the manufacturer that makes it and there are much more reliable ways to assess the quality/durability of a mattress or know whether it has any weak links in its design than using reviews (see this article and the quality/durability guidelines that it links to).

While there is no way to quantify how long any mattress will last for any particular person because there are too many unknowns and variables involved that are unique to each person, if a mattress is well inside a suitable comfort/support range and isn't close to the edge of being too soft when it is new and meets the minimum quality specs that are suggested in the guidelines here then it would be reasonable to expect a useful lifetime in the range of 7 - 10 years and with higher quality and more durable materials like latex or higher density memory foam or polyfoam (in the comfort layers especially) it would likely be in the higher end of the range or even longer. There is also more about the many variables that can affect durability and the useful life of a mattress in post #4 here .

And last but not least, Phoenix or anyone else, any thoughts on a Sealy Atrium if this Dormeo is not recommended?


Unfortunately it's not possible to make any meaningful comments about any mattress unless you know the type and quality of all the materials inside it so you can identify any lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress. In very general terms though I would avoid all the major brands (or any mattress where you don't know the quality of the materials inside it) and the chain stores that often sell them because they all tend to use lower quality/density materials than I would be comfortable with in their comfort layers (see the guidelines here ). Even the few that don't have any obvious weak links in their design are generally not in a good value range compared to many other mattresses that use higher quality and more durable materials and are in lower price ranges.

Just in case you haven't already ... I would also make sure you've read the mattress shopping tutorial which has all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

If you let me know your city or postal code I'd also be happy to let you know about any of the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

Phoenix
13 Apr 2015 14:55
  • rolex
  • rolex's Avatar
I also don't like that a Dormeo rep posted here ONE time then never addressed a single follow up question after that. Take some lessons in Social Media guys, that's weak
13 Apr 2015 14:50
  • rolex
  • rolex's Avatar
Hey folks, greetings from Toronto and I signed up specifically because of this thread.

Me and the Mrs. are in the market for our first ever king mattress and we drove over to Sleep Country since it's close and would have a lot of beds on display.

What it came down to, ultimately, is two choices. One being these OctaSpring beds, and the other was called a Sealy Atrium that was solid memory foam with a euro top

I have to say that the "techie" in me loves the thought of the technology in the Dormeo mattress, but as you all have noted, there is little to no information out there other than this useful forum thread. And the little that is out there, is mostly negative. But you have to expect that people who are unhappy are ultimately going to be the ones posting about it while generally happy customers will not

I guess what I'm ultimately asking is, does anybody have any current opinions now that some time has gone by since the last response?

Any owners out there that can attest to how their bed is holding up?

And last but not least, Phoenix or anyone else, any thoughts on a Sealy Atrium if this Dormeo is not recommended?

Thank you all in advance for any help, I've subscribed to this thread


Cheers!
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