>
×

Advanced Search

Search by Keyword
×

Search Options

Find Posts from
Sort Results by
Search at a specific date
Jump to Result Number
Search in Categories
×

Search Results

Searched for: prana
05 Jan 2017 11:05
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi BKpcam1999,

It sounds like you actually have a good list already prepared for visiting, but if you go through that list and are looking for other options, let me know and I will do my best to be of assistance. Your thoughts of testing locally to get some ideas of what you prefer, and then potentially looking online makes very good sense. And you are correct that adding a topper to a mattress that already has two large gullies would only result in softer gullies!

What is your recommendation about rotating a latex mattress? If you use an adjustable frame do you still have to rotate the mattress?

I always recommend to rotate a mattress, latex or otherwise. All foam softens over time and is subject to mechanical forces that ultimately shorten the comfort life. I’m aware of many retailers who advocate rotating a mattress at the first of every month, and on the other extreme you have manufacturers who state that you never have to rotate a mattress. I think with a latex mattress (of course depending upon use) a rotation of every 2-4 months would generally be more than adequate. And this applies whether the item is on a platform bed, foundation or adjustable bed base.

I’ll be interested to learn of your research progress.

Phoenix
04 Jan 2017 21:15
  • BKpcam1999
  • BKpcam1999's Avatar
Thanks for your fast response. This is an amazing site. I never knew there were so many different materials and mattress variations. It's a wonder anyone ever makes the "right" choice. You asked for my zip code- it's 01749, about 25 miles west of Boston, MA.. I noticed several Mass. members listed- Spindle, Gardner Mattress, Yankee Mattress Factory and Addable . Also Comfort Sleep Systems is in CT, not all that far. Not all of these may have natural foam latex mattresses but I will go to their websites to check out which do. I know you recommend starting locally to test mattresses and calling the companies for help so I plan to get started on that as quickly as possible. If that doesn't pan out, I'll go to Comfort Sleep Systems in CT, and then compare my results to a couple of the online sites such as Foam Sweet Foam (love that name) or Flo Beds. The Comfort Sleep Systems website says they have white glove service for delivery and setup, and others may as well, as you said.. They also list so many different latex mattresses, I'll need a spreadsheet to keep them straight for comparison. If my current Nature's Rest mattress didn't have two large gullies, I'd take the easy route and buy a good latex mattress topper but the gullies would still be there.

One of the interesting facts about the Prana Sleep 5th edition mattresses, is they claim you don't have to rotate it, ever. Not sure if that's really true or good for the,mattress but last year I had a reverse shoulder replacement and when I last rotated my heavy queen mattress, it took several days by myself. What is your recommendation about rotating a latex mattress? If you use an adjustable frame do you still have to rotate the mattress? Thanks again!
04 Jan 2017 11:05
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi BKpcam1999,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I was ready to shell out $5K for a high end latex mattress and Euro-Slat foundation when I stumbled on this great site. I have been sleeping on a latex mattress for 13 years by Nature's Rest (went out of business).

Nature's Rest is made by Spring Air and it may be Spring Air's bankruptcy you are referring to. Consolidated Bedding who owned Spring Air (and Nature's Rest) went bankrupt in 2009 but it was quickly purchased by one of the original owners of Spring Air and re-launched soon after . Nature's Rest was relaunched in 2010 .

They steered me to a line of latex mattresses made by Prana. This company sells through several chains throughout USA and will sell direct at full list. I thought their specs and materials were good until I did detailed research. Other than their top comfort layer of Talalay, the rest of the layers are polyfoam. Now I realize this brand is certainly not worth the high cost, plus they require purchase of one of their foundations in order to honor their warranty.

You can read more about Pranasleep by doing a forum search on Prana . The good news is that they changed the design in their newer version 5 and the top layers of polyfoam are now higher quality/density and are no longer what I would consider to be a weak link in the mattress in terms of durability. Having said that they are still in a significantly higher budget range (as you mentioned) than other similar mattresses. There is more about the new version 5 in post #19 here but I would certainly make some very careful "value" comparisons with other latex mattresses that use similar materials and are in a much lower budget range before considering one of their mattresses to be the "best value" choice available to you.

After reviewing all your great articles I am strongly leaning towards the Foam Sweet Foam or Plush Beds.

Foam Sweet Foam is a member here, which means that I think highly of them, their products and their knowledge.

You can see some of my comments about Plushbeds in post #2 here . They generally use good quality and durable materials in their mattresses and they would certainly be a much "better than average" choice compared to most of the mainstream mattresses that most people end up buying. However, they do a lot of internet advertising so they do attract a lot of online attention with large “discounts”, so I would make some careful "value comparisons" with some of the other options that are available to you because they may not be in the "best value" range for many of the members here that are aware of the many other similar options that are available to them.

Another great online option would be the members of this site listed in post #21 here who are all very experienced and knowledgeable and specialize in providing the type of help and guidance on the phone that can help you make good choices. Many of these manufacturers offer latex component systems like what you are desiring, and I believe that all of them compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, and transparency.

If you provide me your zip code, I can see if I am aware of any better brick and mortar retailers in your area.

My big issue is that the online companies won't set up the bed, only delivering to my door. As a single 68 year old woman, there is no waybig can lift and remove my old heavy latex queen mattress and box spring and then handle a new queen latex mattress and possible foundation, I like the idea of being able to changet the internal layers to customize the support and comfort but even that task seems daunting by myself.

I understand if you might find assembling a component system difficult or awkward, regardless of your age or ability. While it certainly can be accomplished by one person, I always recommend two people to make the task easier to perform. And ordering a product in a "split" configuration, even if you desire the same feel on each side of the mattress, can also make it easier when assembling a component system mattress.

It sounds like you are looking specifically for what is called “White Glove” delivery by the industry, where your mattress will be delivered and set up for you. Post #3 here , while not totally inclusive, includes a list of some online latex mattresses that have it available as of the last time I checked. I would also note that many manufacturers do have a White Glove option, but don’t list it on their web site, so you’d have to give them a phone call to see if it is available and how much extra it might cost.

Phoenix
04 Jan 2017 08:07
  • BKpcam1999
  • BKpcam1999's Avatar
I was ready to shell out $5K for a high end latex mattress and Euro-Slat foundation when I stumbled on this great site. I have been sleeping on a latex mattress for 13 years by Nature's Rest (went out of business). I have deep gullies where I sleep on both ends and need a new new latex mattress. I had gone to a well respected store that has Sleep Techs. They steered me to a line of latex mattresses made by Prana. This company sells through several chains throughout USA and will sell direct at full list. I thought their specs and materials were good until I did detailed research. Other than their top comfort layer of Talalay, the rest of the layers are polyfoam. Now I realize this brand is certainly not worth the high cost, plus they require purchase of one of their foundations in order to honor their warranty.

After reviewing all your great articles I am strongly leaning towards the Foam Sweet Foam or Plush Beds. My big issue is that the online companies won't set up the bed, only delivering to my door. As a single 68 year old woman, there is no waybig can lift and remove my old heavy latex queen mattress and box spring and then handle a new queen latex mattress and possible foundation, I like the idea of being able to changet the internal layers to customize the support and comfort but even that task seems daunting by myself.

Do you have any suggestions for set up by others other than buying from a local store for crap not worth the cost. Now that I am a relatively educated informed consumer, I am unwilling to waste my hard-earned money on anything other than a good quality latex mattress. I am 5'1", 130 lbs., side and back sleeper with lots of orthopedic issues.

If you have any suggestions or guidance I would welcome your assistance.

BarbK



I
02 Dec 2016 12:41
  • halaluya
  • halaluya's Avatar
Wondering if anyone has tried this platform?

ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: mygreenmattress.com/products/ekko-platform-bed?variant=17581060996

I just picked up a Prana mattress at Urban Mattress. Got a great deal on a floor model. Took my old horrible mattress to the dump and put the new latex one on top of my box springs. I'm not sure if its my imagination or not, but somehow the mattress seems less supportive on the box springs than it did in the store. Is the feel a lot different on a proper foundation?

I like my current headboard and don't like particle board, so I was looking for something simple that would also have room for drawers. Found this, but one of the comments indicated that it wobbled a bit. If it does I imagine it could be strengthened with some additional corner bracing. But wondered if anyone here had used this, or if there's another suggestion for something similar.

Thanks!.
03 Nov 2016 10:54
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Sally,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I have read your wonderfully informative site extensively.


I’m glad you’ve taken the time to study the site.

I am now looking seriously at innerspring mattresses which I understand to be cooler than Latex or Memory Foam. I have also been directed to innerspring mattresses, preferably with pocket coils (with sufficient coil count) and a top layer of natural fibers including wool and cotton.
Also, do you know of other mattresses that are known for being cool? This is my key reason for buying a new mattress


(In addition to the information below ... post #29 here has more information about temperature regulation and the microclimate on a mattress.)

There are many factors which control the sleeping temperature of a mattress and only one of these is the foam/fiber that is used in the mattress ... particularly important is what is contained in the upper layers.

There are 3 main types of foam which is memory foam, polyfoam, and latex. Of these three ... memory foam tends to be the most insulating and least breathable followed by polyfoam and latex is the most breathable. Talalay tends to be more breathable than Dunlop. There are also variations in each category and less dense foams tend to be more breathable than denser foams while firmer foams tend to allow less sinking in which can mean there is less insulating foam material against your body.

All foams are insulators (rather than heat conductors) so to some degree they will all be warmer than mattresses that contain no foam at all (such as mattresses that only have an innerspring and layers of natural fibers on top) but these tend to be premium or super premium mattresses and for the most part almost all mattresses have some type of foam in the comfort layers.

Some of the other factors involved in how warm a mattress sleeps are how closely the foam conforms to your body (the more closely it conforms around you the more insulating it is), how soft or thick the foam in the comfort layers are (the softer/thicker it is the deeper you will sink into the more insulating materials), the type of quilting used in the mattress (natural fibers allow for more airflow and humidity control which translates into better temperature regulation), the type of ticking (cover) used (natural or more breathable fibers such as cotton or viscose or even some of the more breathable synthetics will wick away moisture and ventilate better and humidity control is a key part of temperature control), and on any cooling technologies used in the mattress such as ventilating and moisture wicking materials, heat conductive materials, or phase change materials (you can read more about these in post #9 here and at the end of post #4 here ) and you can read more about the various different types of gel foams in post #2 here . In general terms gel foams will tend to have a temporary effect on temperature while you are first going to sleep until temperatures equalize but have less effect on temperature regulation throughout the course of the night.

While the upper layers of a mattress are the most significant part of temperature and moisture regulation ... deeper support components that allow more airflow can also have an effect and so innersprings will also tend to sleep cooler than foam support cores as long as the air can ventilate to the outside of the mattress.

You mentioned pocketed coils, and there are differences in the amount of air that moves through different pocketed coil systems, based upon the covering being used. Some more advanced pocketed coil systems have gone to cutting small holes within their fabric coil coverings (seen more in Europe), and even using a special mesh, to increase air flow between the springs. Open spring systems (like Bonnell, LFK or Continuous Coil) will circulate more air than pocketed coil systems.

In addition to this ... the mattress protector you choose along with your sheets and other bedding and what you wear when you sleep will also have a significant effect on temperature regulation because they can either add to the insulating effect or to the ventilating and moisture wicking effect of your mattress. You can see more about the effect of different mattress protectors in post #89 here . Bedding made from natural fibers or viscose materials (like bamboo) will also tend to be cooler than synthetic fibers and linen sheets along with silk are probably the coolest of all the natural fibers for those where sleeping temperature is a main priority. There is more about sheets and bedding in post #7 here . In many cases changing the mattress protector, sheets, or bedding to cooler versions can make "enough" of a difference for many people who would otherwise sleep hot on a mattress.

All of this of course is separate from any environmental conditions in the bedroom (temperature and humidity levels with higher humidity adding to the perception of heat), on the physiology and tendency of the person themselves to sleep warmer or cooler and where they are in the "oven to iceberg" range, and on their weight and body type which will affect how deeply they sink into the foam layers of the mattress.

In other words ... it's always a combination of several interacting factors that determines the sleeping temperature of a mattress in combination with a specific person and environment.

Overall ... if you are looking at a mattress that contains foam of some type ... then latex with natural fibers in the quilting (such as wool) and fabrics that can wick away moisture and help it evaporate more rapidly are the coolest sleeping or more accurately the most temperature regulating mattresses and firmer will tend to be cooler than softer.

Mattresses that don't use any foam at all and only use an innerspring with natural fiber comfort layers will tend to be cooler and more temperature regulating than any type of foam including latex.

Today I visited Urban Mattress and tried their VISPRING Elite and Coronet mattresses. These are well made but quite expensive.


Vi-Spring certainly makes some exceptionally high quality hand built and tufted mattresses that uses high quality materials and components (pocket coils and natural fibers) but as you probably know they are in a much more premium budget range than many other mattresses that also use natural materials. There is more about Vi Spring and other "ultra premium" mattresses in post #2 here and post #2 here and post #2 here may also be of interest as well but I would be very careful to differentiate how you feel "about" a Vi Spring and how you feel "on" a Vi Spring. There are certainly cases where a mattress in this budget range may be "worth it" for a particular person that isn't price sensitive and that has specific criteria that aren't available in lower budget ranges but this would be unusual and in general I would need a compelling reason that clearly indicated there was "enough" of a difference in "real life" compared to many other mattresses that may be just as suitable in terms of comfort and PPP, just as durable, and that are in much lower budget ranges to justify the higher cost.

Do you know of similar types of mattresses?


Finding a "comparable" mattress will really depend on what you mean by comparable.

There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting materials) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you are able to find another mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials, components, cover, layer thicknesses, layer firmnesses, and overall design (which would be very unlikely) then there really isn't a reliable way to match one mattress to another one in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP based on the specifications of the mattresses (even assuming that you can find out all the specifications you would need for both mattresses you are comparing in the first place).

Mattress manufacturers generally try to differentiate their mattress from the mattresses made by other manufacturers and don't normally try to "match" another mattress that is made by a different manufacturer so unless a manufacturer specifically says in their description of a mattress that one of their mattresses in the same general category is specifically designed to "match" or "approximate" another one in terms of firmness or "feel" and PPP and/or they are very familiar with both mattresses and can provide reliable guidance about how they compare based on the "averages" of a larger group of people that have compared them (different people may have very different opinions about how two mattresses compare) ... the only reliable way to know for certain how two mattresses would compare for you in terms of how they "feel" or in terms of firmness or PPP (regardless of anyone else's opinions of how they compare which may be different from your own) would be based on your own careful testing or actual sleeping experience on both of them.

There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

In other words ... if two mattresses have different designs and materials then your own careful testing or personal experience is the only reliable way to compare two mattresses in terms of "comfort" firmness, and PPP.

Comparing two mattresses in terms of durability is much more simple and more objective once you know the specifications of all the materials and layers in two mattresses you are comparing ( see this article ) because making durability comparisons is just a matter of comparing the quality and durability of the materials and components inside it and making sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress that would be a reason for concern. If for any reason a retailer or manufacturer you are dealing with either isn't willing or able to provide you with the specifics of the materials and components in their mattresses, then I would avoid it completely. Again though I would always keep in mind that the quality and durability of the materials has little to nothing to do with how a mattress will feel or compare to any other mattress in terms of comfort, firmness, or PPP.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice ( see this article ), of course with a strong part of your PPP being a more breathable product.

I know I’ve given you a lot to think about, but the questions you posed don’t have simple answers. But hopefully the information I’ve presented will be assistive to you as you go through this process.

I look forward to learning about your progress!

Phoenix
03 Nov 2016 10:54
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Sally,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I have read your wonderfully informative site extensively.


I’m glad you’ve taken the time to study the site.

I am now looking seriously at innerspring mattresses which I understand to be cooler than Latex or Memory Foam. I have also been directed to innerspring mattresses, preferably with pocket coils (with sufficient coil count) and a top layer of natural fibers including wool and cotton.
Also, do you know of other mattresses that are known for being cool? This is my key reason for buying a new mattress


(In addition to the information below ... post #29 here has more information about temperature regulation and the microclimate on a mattress.)

There are many factors which control the sleeping temperature of a mattress and only one of these is the foam/fiber that is used in the mattress ... particularly important is what is contained in the upper layers.

There are 3 main types of foam which is memory foam, polyfoam, and latex. Of these three ... memory foam tends to be the most insulating and least breathable followed by polyfoam and latex is the most breathable. Talalay tends to be more breathable than Dunlop. There are also variations in each category and less dense foams tend to be more breathable than denser foams while firmer foams tend to allow less sinking in which can mean there is less insulating foam material against your body.

All foams are insulators (rather than heat conductors) so to some degree they will all be warmer than mattresses that contain no foam at all (such as mattresses that only have an innerspring and layers of natural fibers on top) but these tend to be premium or super premium mattresses and for the most part almost all mattresses have some type of foam in the comfort layers.

Some of the other factors involved in how warm a mattress sleeps are how closely the foam conforms to your body (the more closely it conforms around you the more insulating it is), how soft or thick the foam in the comfort layers are (the softer/thicker it is the deeper you will sink into the more insulating materials), the type of quilting used in the mattress (natural fibers allow for more airflow and humidity control which translates into better temperature regulation), the type of ticking (cover) used (natural or more breathable fibers such as cotton or viscose or even some of the more breathable synthetics will wick away moisture and ventilate better and humidity control is a key part of temperature control), and on any cooling technologies used in the mattress such as ventilating and moisture wicking materials, heat conductive materials, or phase change materials (you can read more about these in post #9 here and at the end of post #4 here ) and you can read more about the various different types of gel foams in post #2 here . In general terms gel foams will tend to have a temporary effect on temperature while you are first going to sleep until temperatures equalize but have less effect on temperature regulation throughout the course of the night.

While the upper layers of a mattress are the most significant part of temperature and moisture regulation ... deeper support components that allow more airflow can also have an effect and so innersprings will also tend to sleep cooler than foam support cores as long as the air can ventilate to the outside of the mattress.

You mentioned pocketed coils, and there are differences in the amount of air that moves through different pocketed coil systems, based upon the covering being used. Some more advanced pocketed coil systems have gone to cutting small holes within their fabric coil coverings (seen more in Europe), and even using a special mesh, to increase air flow between the springs. Open spring systems (like Bonnell, LFK or Continuous Coil) will circulate more air than pocketed coil systems.

In addition to this ... the mattress protector you choose along with your sheets and other bedding and what you wear when you sleep will also have a significant effect on temperature regulation because they can either add to the insulating effect or to the ventilating and moisture wicking effect of your mattress. You can see more about the effect of different mattress protectors in post #89 here . Bedding made from natural fibers or viscose materials (like bamboo) will also tend to be cooler than synthetic fibers and linen sheets along with silk are probably the coolest of all the natural fibers for those where sleeping temperature is a main priority. There is more about sheets and bedding in post #7 here . In many cases changing the mattress protector, sheets, or bedding to cooler versions can make "enough" of a difference for many people who would otherwise sleep hot on a mattress.

All of this of course is separate from any environmental conditions in the bedroom (temperature and humidity levels with higher humidity adding to the perception of heat), on the physiology and tendency of the person themselves to sleep warmer or cooler and where they are in the "oven to iceberg" range, and on their weight and body type which will affect how deeply they sink into the foam layers of the mattress.

In other words ... it's always a combination of several interacting factors that determines the sleeping temperature of a mattress in combination with a specific person and environment.

Overall ... if you are looking at a mattress that contains foam of some type ... then latex with natural fibers in the quilting (such as wool) and fabrics that can wick away moisture and help it evaporate more rapidly are the coolest sleeping or more accurately the most temperature regulating mattresses and firmer will tend to be cooler than softer.

Mattresses that don't use any foam at all and only use an innerspring with natural fiber comfort layers will tend to be cooler and more temperature regulating than any type of foam including latex.

Today I visited Urban Mattress and tried their VISPRING Elite and Coronet mattresses. These are well made but quite expensive.


Vi-Spring certainly makes some exceptionally high quality hand built and tufted mattresses that uses high quality materials and components (pocket coils and natural fibers) but as you probably know they are in a much more premium budget range than many other mattresses that also use natural materials. There is more about Vi Spring and other "ultra premium" mattresses in post #2 here and post #2 here and post #2 here may also be of interest as well but I would be very careful to differentiate how you feel "about" a Vi Spring and how you feel "on" a Vi Spring. There are certainly cases where a mattress in this budget range may be "worth it" for a particular person that isn't price sensitive and that has specific criteria that aren't available in lower budget ranges but this would be unusual and in general I would need a compelling reason that clearly indicated there was "enough" of a difference in "real life" compared to many other mattresses that may be just as suitable in terms of comfort and PPP, just as durable, and that are in much lower budget ranges to justify the higher cost.

Do you know of similar types of mattresses?


Finding a "comparable" mattress will really depend on what you mean by comparable.

There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting materials) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you are able to find another mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials, components, cover, layer thicknesses, layer firmnesses, and overall design (which would be very unlikely) then there really isn't a reliable way to match one mattress to another one in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP based on the specifications of the mattresses (even assuming that you can find out all the specifications you would need for both mattresses you are comparing in the first place).

Mattress manufacturers generally try to differentiate their mattress from the mattresses made by other manufacturers and don't normally try to "match" another mattress that is made by a different manufacturer so unless a manufacturer specifically says in their description of a mattress that one of their mattresses in the same general category is specifically designed to "match" or "approximate" another one in terms of firmness or "feel" and PPP and/or they are very familiar with both mattresses and can provide reliable guidance about how they compare based on the "averages" of a larger group of people that have compared them (different people may have very different opinions about how two mattresses compare) ... the only reliable way to know for certain how two mattresses would compare for you in terms of how they "feel" or in terms of firmness or PPP (regardless of anyone else's opinions of how they compare which may be different from your own) would be based on your own careful testing or actual sleeping experience on both of them.

There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

In other words ... if two mattresses have different designs and materials then your own careful testing or personal experience is the only reliable way to compare two mattresses in terms of "comfort" firmness, and PPP.

Comparing two mattresses in terms of durability is much more simple and more objective once you know the specifications of all the materials and layers in two mattresses you are comparing ( see this article ) because making durability comparisons is just a matter of comparing the quality and durability of the materials and components inside it and making sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress that would be a reason for concern. If for any reason a retailer or manufacturer you are dealing with either isn't willing or able to provide you with the specifics of the materials and components in their mattresses, then I would avoid it completely. Again though I would always keep in mind that the quality and durability of the materials has little to nothing to do with how a mattress will feel or compare to any other mattress in terms of comfort, firmness, or PPP.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice ( see this article ), of course with a strong part of your PPP being a more breathable product.

I know I’ve given you a lot to think about, but the questions you posed don’t have simple answers. But hopefully the information I’ve presented will be assistive to you as you go through this process.

I look forward to learning about your progress!

Phoenix
15 Oct 2016 11:00
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Jilly:

Has anyone tried the new copper infused fabrics available on mattresses?


I personally don’t have any experiences with these fabrics, but perhaps other knowledgeable people on this site can provide some feedback.

There is some good general information on sheets and bedding here .

Regarding copper and its healing claims, here is an article that discusses that.

Copper is encapsulated and currently used in some foams (like some latex from Talalay Global), more for the small additional amount of heat transfer that it can provide.

Phoenix
14 Oct 2016 09:59
  • Jilly
  • Jilly's Avatar
Has anyone tried the new copper infused fabrics available on mattresses?
06 Oct 2016 14:26
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi NPSleeper,

I'd be interested in hearing from other side sleepers or people who have dealt with hip pain. I know PPP and mattress selection is a highly personal thing, but I feel like it can be valuable to examine other people's experiences, in aggregate.


While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular store or business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress so I would be very cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

Using other people's reviews or experiences to buy a mattress would be something like buying a pair of shoes in a size that fits someone else or that is buying shoes for a very different reason than you are (such as running when you are looking for a pair of shoes to wear for work) just because they really like the shoes that they purchased.

Individual or even aggregated reviews would have very little meaning or relevance for any specific person.

Are there any specific mattresses or brands you can point me to that use similar materials to the Prana Vinyasa Luxury Plush?


The mattress shopping tutorial includes a link to a list of the members here that sell mattresses online (in the optional online step) and many of them sell latex and latex hybrid mattresses that use different types and blends of latex that have a wide range of different designs, options, features, return and exchange policies, and prices that you can use as reference points for "value" based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
06 Oct 2016 14:05
  • NPSleeper
  • NPSleeper's Avatar
Hi, Phoenix, thank you for the detailed reply! This site has been a great resource.

I'd be interested in hearing from other side sleepers or people who have dealt with hip pain. I know PPP and mattress selection is a highly personal thing, but I feel like it can be valuable to examine other people's experiences, in aggregate.

Once again though I would make some very careful value comparisons here as well because it's also in a much higher budget range than other mattresses that use similar materials.


Are there any specific mattresses or brands you can point me to that use similar materials to the Prana Vinyasa Luxury Plush?
06 Oct 2016 10:03
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi NPSleeper,

I'm in need of advice — I'm a side sleeper (36, female, 180 lbs.), and a week ago, I woke up in so much pain that I could hardly walk. I was completely bent over, and had to shuffle in small steps; the pain was deep in my right hip, near the socket/joint. If I tried extending my right leg at a normal walking angle, it felt like the whole thing would snap. I assumed the problem was muscular, but now I think it may have been bursitis or a pinched nerve.

I don't have ANY chronic hip problems, so it was 100% the way I was sleeping.


While your other comments seem to indicate that it's time for a new mattress ... It's also probable that your "sudden" experience here wasn't because of the mattress and was more likely to be from how you slept on the mattress. For example almost everyone has made some kind of twisting or jerking motion while they were doing something they have done hundreds of times and ended up with a pulled muscle that was painful for days. I have even had this happen while I was shaving for example. If you sleep well on a mattress for a period of time then issues or "symptoms" that are the result of the mattress generally start to happen or build up more gradually. It sounds like your experience put buying a new mattress on the front burner though which may be a good thing anyway.

Here's the thing — when I'm trying out mattresses in stores, I seem to prefer a firmer feel. I'm just not sure that is the wisest option in the long run, because countless people I've spoken to say that side sleepers need a softer mattress.


They are right that "most" side sleepers do better with a softer mattress than back and especially stomach sleepers but each person is unique and not everyone fits the "averages" of other people. It's also true that you can "fix" a mattress that is too firm by adding a softer topper but it's much more difficult to "fix" a mattress that is too soft because this would generally require opening up the mattress and removing and replacing the layers that are too soft with firmer layers.

I am not a fan of the retail experience in the big box stores, but I visited a few anyway, at the start of my mattress-buying journey. Of the "big" brands, the bed I liked the best was the Beautyrest World Class Luxury Firm, and the Aireloom/Hotel Collection Vitagenic Copper Streamline Plush, and the Stearns & Foster Palace Luxury Firm.


The major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (and the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with avoiding any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

It's also unlikely that you would be able to find out the specs of the Aireloom mattress either (see this article ) which means that I would avoid it as well.

Spending time testing major brand mattresses or any mattress where you can't find out the specifics of the materials and components inside it or where another manufacturer doesn't make a similar or better quality/value mattress that they specifically describe as being similar (which you won't find in the case of any of these mattresses) is mostly wasted because it would be too risky to purchase and it can't be used as a reference point to purchase another mattress that is "similar".

I'm looking into online options like Casper, Leesa, Helix, and T&F, but it's hard to tell which one might work best, without being able to test them in person.


It's not only hard to tell ... it would be impossible to know for sure outside of testing them side by side or your own personal experience when you sleep on them. I would always keep in mind that there is no such thing as "one mattress fits all" and any specific mattress may be the "best" match for a relatively small percentage of people, a "good" match for a larger percentage, and an "OK" match for a larger percentage yet but the only way to know for certain whether an online mattress you end up choosing will be a "good enough" match for you to keep it (even if it isn't the "best match" out of all the mattresses that you "could have tried" instead) will be based on your own personal experience when you sleep on it.

Many online mattresses (including the ones you mentioned) have a good trial period and return policy so you can try them in your bedroom instead of a showroom with little risk (outside of the time you spend sleeping on it and/or returning it if that becomes necessary or any costs involved in the return process) so if it's not a "good enough" match for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) you can just return it and try another mattress if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for but once again you will only know whether it's "good enough" and you won't know whether it would have been better or worse or how it compares to other mattresses that you could have purchased instead that you haven't actually tried in person. This is one of the disadvantages of buying a mattress online that you can only try "one at a time" vs local testing in a store where you can compare many mattresses side by side at the same time.

There is more information about the type and quality/durability of the materials in all the mattresses you mentioned along with many of the other what I call "simplified choice" mattresses in post #2 here and the first post in the same topic would also be well worth reading as well.

I finally visited Urban Mattress this week, and was pleasantly surprised at how down-to-earth and knowledgeable the guy who helped me was (his name was Andy). The mattress I liked the best (and it was an instant "oh my g-d" reaction) was the Integrity from their Urban Mattress line. It was firm and supportive, but also had a plush quilted top, and a bit of bounciness. (SPECS HERE).

The store rep seemed to think I would be happier in the long run with something more plush, because a firm mattress would press too much on my pressure points. Isn't it true that all mattresses (especially comfort layers) soften a bit over time? I'm concerned about getting a mattress that's soft to begin with, and ending up in pain from sleeping on a sagging marshmallow after a year.

I asked, and the polyfoam that's in the top is two 1.5 inch layers of 2.1 LB foam. There's also 2" of Firm 36 ILD latex. Do you think the plush feeling from the quilted top could eventually go away, leaving me with TOO firm of a mattress?


There will be an initial break in and adjustment period for any new mattress or sleeping system as the mattress loses any of it's "false firmness" and the cover stretches and loosens a little and the materials settle and your body gets used to a sleeping surface that is different from what it is used to (see post #3 here ). This would typically be a few weeks but it can be shorter or longer depending on the specifics of the person and the mattress (higher density materials can take longer) and it can be surprising to many people how much their sleeping experience can change over the course of the first month or so.

Once you are past the initial break in and adjustment period then if the mattress uses good quality and durable materials (which it does) then any further foam softening will tend to be much more gradual and happen over a much longer period of time. The mattresses on a showroom floor will usually be past their break in period so a new mattress can feel firmer than the same mattress that you tested in the showroom until it has been broken in as well. In other words I would choose a mattress based on whether your careful testing in a showroom (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) indicates that a mattress is a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP and not on how it "may" feel in the future.

The Integrity uses good quality materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links that could compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress or be a reason for concern although it's also in a higher budget range than other mattresses that use similar materials so I would make some careful "value" comparisons with other mattresses that may be just as suitable and just as durable but are in lower budget ranges.

The other mattress he had me try was a Prana Sleep Super Vinyasa Luxury Plush (Gen 5). It's a floor model that's 50% off. It was nice, but it bordered on too soft, and although my spine was aligned horizontally, it felt like my shoulders and back wanted lean back compared to my hips (so I didn't feel as stable front-to-back as on the firm mattress). It also didn't feel as good lying on my stomach. (SPECS HERE)

3/4" 2.5LB Soft poly foam
1" 2.5lb Soft poly foam
1" 2.5lb Soft poly foam
Comfort Layers: 1" Soft PranaSleep Performance Latex
2" Medium PranaSleep Performance Latex
Support System: 6" PranaSleep Performance Core
Talalay process
BOTTOM UPHOLSTERY (Below Core)
1" 1.45LB Firm poly foam

Given those foam densities, what is the likelihood that this mattress will start to feel even softer, or develop indentations over time? It was nice, but if it were 10-20% softer, I could imagine it being unbearable. I'm not sure if the softness is something I'd get used to (and might be easier on my hips in the long run), or if it would drive me crazy.


The Vinyasa also uses high quality materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links that could compromise its durability or useful life either. Once again though I would make some very careful value comparisons here as well because it's also in a much higher budget range than other mattresses that use similar materials.

As it's a floor model, it would be final sale. So that's also troubling, because at least with one of the other mattresses, I would have one exchange and a comfort guarantee.


I'm not sure how much of a discount you are receiving but there are other mattresses that use similar materials that are available at substantially lower prices that may be similar to the price you would be receiving for the floor model and it would be a concern for me as well if you aren't confident that the mattress is a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP and that you will sleep well on it.

Should I go with my initial preference and seek out a relatively firm mattress, or should I get used to sleeping on something softer? Thank you in advance for any recommendations you can offer.


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm assuming that you've read the mattress shopping tutorial here but two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

In its simplest form ... choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight/BMI range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress (see the durability guidelines here ).

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
05 Oct 2016 23:10
  • NPSleeper
  • NPSleeper's Avatar
I'm in need of advice — I'm a side sleeper (36, female, 180 lbs.), and a week ago, I woke up in so much pain that I could hardly walk. I was completely bent over, and had to shuffle in small steps; the pain was deep in my right hip, near the socket/joint. If I tried extending my right leg at a normal walking angle, it felt like the whole thing would snap. I assumed the problem was muscular, but now I think it may have been bursitis or a pinched nerve.

I don't have ANY chronic hip problems, so it was 100% the way I was sleeping.

My current mattress is a Miralux (a Sleepy's house brand; there's my first mistake) that is 6 years old. It's foam-based, and was $1300, but I didn't research enough before buying it, and didn't realize it was a virtually unknown brand. I also haven't flipped it regularly, and I currently have it on an IKEA Malm frame with wooden slats. The slats keep shifting and the mattress feels like it "tilts" to one side (the right side, that caused me pain). This has been going on for a few months, but things hadn't reached "emergency level.," until last week.

Needless to say, I'm shopping for a mattress and a new frame.

Here's the thing — when I'm trying out mattresses in stores, I seem to prefer a firmer feel. I'm just not sure that is the wisest option in the long run, because countless people I've spoken to say that side sleepers need a softer mattress.

I am not a fan of the retail experience in the big box stores, but I visited a few anyway, at the start of my mattress-buying journey. Of the "big" brands, the bed I liked the best was the Beautyrest World Class Luxury Firm, and the Aireloom/Hotel Collection Vitagenic Copper Streamline Plush, and the Stearns & Foster Palace Luxury Firm.

I do not like all-memory-foam, or feeling like I'm "stuck." I also don't like overly cushioned pillow tops. I DO like a little bit of bounce and responsiveness.

I'm looking into online options like Casper, Leesa, Helix, and T&F, but it's hard to tell which one might work best, without being able to test them in person.

I finally visited Urban Mattress this week, and was pleasantly surprised at how down-to-earth and knowledgeable the guy who helped me was (his name was Andy). The mattress I liked the best (and it was an instant "oh my g-d" reaction) was the Integrity from their Urban Mattress line. It was firm and supportive, but also had a plush quilted top, and a bit of bounciness. ( SPECS HERE ).

The store rep seemed to think I would be happier in the long run with something more plush, because a firm mattress would press too much on my pressure points. Isn't it true that all mattresses (especially comfort layers) soften a bit over time? I'm concerned about getting a mattress that's soft to begin with, and ending up in pain from sleeping on a sagging marshmallow after a year.

I asked, and the polyfoam that's in the top is two 1.5 inch layers of 2.1 LB foam. There's also 2" of Firm 36 ILD latex. Do you think the plush feeling from the quilted top could eventually go away, leaving me with TOO firm of a mattress?

The other mattress he had me try was a Prana Sleep Super Vinyasa Luxury Plush (Gen 5). It's a floor model that's 50% off. It was nice, but it bordered on too soft, and although my spine was aligned horizontally, it felt like my shoulders and back wanted lean back compared to my hips (so I didn't feel as stable front-to-back as on the firm mattress). It also didn't feel as good lying on my stomach. ( SPECS HERE )

3/4" 2.5LB Soft poly foam
1" 2.5lb Soft poly foam
1" 2.5lb Soft poly foam
Comfort Layers: 1" Soft PranaSleep Performance Latex
2" Medium PranaSleep Performance Latex
Support System: 6" PranaSleep Performance Core
Talalay process
BOTTOM UPHOLSTERY (Below Core)
1" 1.45LB Firm poly foam

Given those foam densities, what is the likelihood that this mattress will start to feel even softer, or develop indentations over time? It was nice, but if it were 10-20% softer, I could imagine it being unbearable. I'm not sure if the softness is something I'd get used to (and might be easier on my hips in the long run), or if it would drive me crazy.

As it's a floor model, it would be final sale. So that's also troubling, because at least with one of the other mattresses, I would have one exchange and a comfort guarantee.

Should I go with my initial preference and seek out a relatively firm mattress, or should I get used to sleeping on something softer? Thank you in advance for any recommendations you can offer.
09 Sep 2016 09:42
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Dayne411,

We strongly considered buying the Prana and then Sean, the owner said they have 3 inch latex toppers.


I'm guessing you mean Neal (the owner of Spindle)?

We tried the medium topper on the firm mattress and it gave us the exact feel we were looking for. It cradled us perfectly while still offering ample support.

We also got 10% off.

5% mattress undergrond discount
2.5% pickup instead of delivery
2.5% paid by check instead of credit card

I'll report back once we take delivery and get a few nights on it


It's good to hear that you were able to find a combination that works well for you and you certainly made a great quality/value choice.

Congratulations on your new mattress :)

I'm looking forward to your comments and feedback once you've received it and have had the chance to sleep on it for a bit.

Phoenix
09 Sep 2016 09:05
  • Dayne411
  • Dayne411's Avatar
Thanks for all the help.

We went to Spindle Mattress and tested out all of their 100% latex mattresses and we didn't fall in love with any of them. We strongly considered buying the Prana and then Sean, the owner said they have 3 inch latex toppers.

We tried the medium topper on the firm mattress and it gave us the exact feel we were looking for. It cradled us perfectly while still offering ample support.

We also got 10% off.

5% mattress undergrond discount
2.5% pickup instead of delivery
2.5% paid by check instead of credit card

I'll report back once we take delivery and get a few nights on it
Displaying 91 - 105 out of 457 results.
The Mattress UndergroundCopyright © 2022 The Mattress Underground
TheMattressUndergounf
TMU
TheMattressUndergounf