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Searched for: Tuft Needle
23 May 2021 14:26
  • Grayson73
  • Grayson73's Avatar
We noticed the Winkbed has a lot of motion transfer, so now I'm down to Brooklyn Bedding Signature Medium and Tuft & Needle Mint
22 May 2021 16:51
  • Grayson73
  • Grayson73's Avatar
Thanks for replying! We are sleeping on a queen memory foam bed that we bought in 2011 for $350 from foammattressdiscounts.com, The description was "Queen Size 5lb Density 8 Inch Memory Foam Mattress".

As for the price question, I asked because I was trying to understand what moving up from the Brooklyn Signature Soft to the Brooklyn Aurora Soft, Brooklyn Spartan Soft, or Brooklyn Sedona or Layla Hybrid soft would get me, or even other more expensive brands such as Amerisleep AS3/AS4/AS5, Casper Nova Hybrid, Ghostbed Luxe, Helix Sunset, Molecule 2, Muse, Nest Bedding Alexander, PlushBeds Botanical Bliss, Puffy Lux, Saatva Classic, Tuft & Needle Hybrid, Winkbed/Winkbed GravityLux/Winkbed EcoCloud.

I am going to Sleepare in Tysons Corner, VA tomorrow to try a bunch of beds.
24 Apr 2021 12:54
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey undisclosed,

Thanks for your updates :) .

Update: I went with the Thuma frame based on the long warranty and the 100 day sleep trial, and the allegedly low VOC/ water based treatments used. The Tatami frame uses more toxic treatment for the wood as I know another visitor of this forum learned from them but when I contacted them they never got back to me about my question of what kind of VOCs I can expect to offgas and that was a turnoff. Who knows if Thuma really is as eco-friendly as they claim - it could be marketing just like when corporate farmers slap the organic logo onto their food.


Congrats on your new Thuma frame :) ! Their model (known as The Bed) is Greenguard certified, and according to their FAQs :

"For a Greenguard certification, our VOC levels needed to be ≤ 0.25 mg/m³. We tested at 0.008 mg/m³, which is 30 plus times under the VOC level criteria. We feel really good about these numbers and know it makes a real difference in the world and for customers. The Bed means less indoor pollution, cleaner air, and a better environment for you."

Their mission and marketing does reflect their desire to be "mindful of our environmental impact every step of the way," and being eco-friendly seems to support that credo. They are a fairly young company (founded in 2016), and it will be interesting to hear consumers' opinions over time regarding their experiences with The Bed and how eco-friendly they find it to be.

For my previous lousy Amazon purchased bedframe I had a friend make extra slats to make up for wide spacing and found that I didn't need those spare slats for this frame. Their slats are probably of lower quality than the ones my friend made - his were much smoother while some of the Thuma slats are definitely rough/not sanded smooth. BUT the Thuma slats are thicker which confirms their 'double plywood' approach as my friend's slats looked the same from a side view (if you looked at where the wood is cut and can see the layers) but his were thinner.


Good to hear that you find their slats to be substantial as you had mentioned before concerns about the use of a "double plywood" approach.

I imagine the revew stating the slats fall out of the frame meant there was a LOT of bending going on because the slats have at least two inches(ish? I didn't measure for precision) of wood to rest on the frame on both sides. I'd be curious to know how much weight that frame was taking (although Thuma does claim up to 1500lbs of weight, right?) I think we'd need to know more about the reviewer's circumstances as to how this happened and how much weight the frame was taking and any other activities... I didn't see any reviews like that on my end when I was sleuthing to learn more.


Absolutely agree, undisclosed; it would be far more helpful if the reviewer had included more details of total weight supported, the type and size mattress used, any other activities involved, etc. Hopefully, you will update the forum periodically on your Thuma journey so other consumers can learn from your experiences ;) .

I have slept on the Thuma frame for about 1.5 months now and so far I am satisfied. It is a great fit for my Tuft & Needle queen size "the Ten". Does anyone know how much that weighs? And my partner and I are a combined weight of about 330lbs.


Good to hear that you like the pairing of your T&N Original 10 and The Bed platform so far! I chatted with T&N regarding weight info and found that the compressed shipping weight of a queen size is 72 lbs. and it supports up to 1,000 lbs. of combined weight.

Assembling it was easy and fun, which further adds to the appeal of the Thuma frame for an apt dweller like myself. My only wish is the stupid headboard were ATTACHED to the frame rather than resting on a wall.


Thuma's Japanese joinery, combined with its' minimalist/ functional design, does seem an attractive platform bed choice for apartment dwellers. I'm with you on that a free-standing headboard isn't necessarily an optimal choice for everyone but likely is more desirable for The Bed's overall minimalist functionality.

In terms of my T&F Ten holding up, I have had it for 6 or 7 years now and it's definitely broken in - where I sleep is softer (but not saggy) but given that I like a nice firm sleep, I do slide myself to the middle of the bed when my partner gets up for work so I can enjoy the firm, unbroken in center of the bed. I suppose this means I'll be on the market for a new bed in the next 3 years or so and I wonder what kind of bed I'll be thinking about purchasing. Something firm of course


Thanks again for the thoughtful and thorough review of both your new Thuma and teenage T&N 10, undisclosed. Hopefully, you'll get another 3+ years from your T&N 10 but in the meantime, you can always check in with TMU while researching your future firm mattress purchase… ;) .

Cheers,
Sensei
21 Apr 2021 09:43
  • undisclosed
  • undisclosed's Avatar
Update: I went with the Thuma frame based on the long warranty and the 100 day sleep trial, and the allegedly low VOC/ water based treatments used. The Tatami frame uses more toxic treatment for the wood as I know another visitor of this forum learned from them but when I contacted them they never got back to me about my question of what kind of VOCs I can expect to offgas and that was a turnoff. Who knows if Thuma really is as eco-friendly as they claim - it could be marketing just like when corporate farmers slap the organic logo onto their food. :side:

For my previous lousy Amazon purchased bedframe I had a friend make extra slats to make up for wide spacing and found that I didn't need those spare slats for this frame. Their slats are probably of lower quality than the ones my friend made - his were much smoother while some of the Thuma slats are definitely rough/not sanded smooth. BUT the Thuma slats are thicker which confirms their 'double plywood' approach as my friend's slats looked the same from a side view (if you looked at where the wood is cut and can see the layers) but his were thinner.

I imagine the revew stating the slats fall out of the frame meant there was a LOT of bending going on because the slats have at least two inches(ish? I didn't measure for precision) of wood to rest on the frame on both sides. I'd be curious to know how much weight that frame was taking (although Thuma does claim up to 1500lbs of weight, right?) I think we'd need to know more about the reviewer's circumstances as to how this happened and how much weight the frame was taking and any other activities... I didn't see any reviews like that on my end when I was sleuthing to learn more.

I have slept on the Thuma frame for about 1.5 months now and so far I am satisfied. It is a great fit for my Tuft & Needle queen size "the Ten". Does anyone know how much that weighs? And my partner and I are a combined weight of about 330lbs.

Assembling it was easy and fun, which further adds to the appeal of the Thuma frame for an apt dweller like myself. My only wish is the stupid headboard were ATTACHED to the frame rather than resting on a wall.

In terms of my T&F Ten holding up, I have had it for 6 or 7 years now and it's definitely broken in - where I sleep is softer (but not saggy) but given that I like a nice firm sleep, I do slide myself to the middle of the bed when my partner gets up for work so I can enjoy the firm, unbroken in center of the bed. I suppose this means I'll be on the market for a new bed in the next 3 years or so and I wonder what kind of bed I'll be thinking about purchasing. Something firm of course :)
21 Mar 2021 11:39
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey calentarse,

Welcome back to the forum :) ! Good to see you again and thanks for your two year BB replacement update, sorry to hear that things don't sound as if they are working out. I'm heading over to your new question now for response, see you in a few ;) .

Thanks,
Sensei
19 Mar 2021 07:34
  • calentarse
  • calentarse's Avatar
Two years later, the replacement mattress has done the same thing. We are around 170lbs and 145lbs, little heavier than we were before, but not overweight for our height. I will be posting a new question and hope to get some guidance on what mattress we should consider next. Just wanted to report our findings with BB!
05 Mar 2021 15:58
  • NikkiTMU
  • NikkiTMU's Avatar
Hi dang10010.

Would you happen to have the specifications for the Nod handy?

Children have much different needs than adults because their body shape in not yet as curvy and they tend to do better with a firmer surface.

You may wish to consider a multi-layered component style system mattress that you can add or exchange layers to as your child grows. If and when they need a softer comfort layer in their "sleeping system” you can also add a softer topper to any firmer child' mattress when they get older and develop more adult proportions. Generally, a child won’t need more than 6” or so of latex, so you can certainly use the lower/firmer layers for a child’s bed as they are very adaptable at a younger age and can sleep almost on anything.

Generally, for growing children, you want something more in the “medium” to “medium-firm” range, due to their epiphyseal plate and postural formation.

Post #2 here includes links to most of the better forum posts and topics about mattresses and children and includes some suggestions and guidelines and links to some good quality/value options as well.

I wouldn't put much weight in warranties. Warranties are not a reliable indicator of the useful life of a mattress as most of them have exclusions designed to protect the manufacturer from honoring them or exclude "normal" body impressions and don't cover the loss of comfort and support that comes from foam softening. Granted that latex can in certain cases last for at least a decade. Beware of any salesperson who attempts to sell you a mattress based on its warranty and bear in mind that some of the highest quality and longest lasting mattresses in the world only have a 10-year warranty. In other words, base your durability estimates on what you know about the materials in a mattress, not on manufacturer warranties.

I've given you a lot to consider here! Do let us know if you have additional questions.
NikkiTMU
04 Mar 2021 15:06
  • dang10010
  • dang10010's Avatar
I couldn't find any info on the Nod by Tuft & Needle on Amazon on this forum. I'm assuming since it's from Tuft & Needle it's a good product and it comes with a 10 year warranty with no more than a 3/4" dent. This would be for my daughter, she's 13 and growing fast and her current bed is giving her back pains. I'd like something that can last her several years as she continues to grow. Just curious if anyone has any experience with this particular bed, it seems very reasonably priced but I can only find it on Amazon.
07 Feb 2021 12:10
  • noahsi
  • noahsi's Avatar

Is it fair to say the version with the 28 ild Talalay topper would be pretty similar to what I have now? (Maybe a little softer)? The middle layer is a little softer in the Luma and I don’t know how the latex base support layer in the Luma compares to the foam in my current Brooklyn bedding mattress.... Do you think the Luma would be a bit more plush than the nest?


This wouldn’t be “fair to say” regarding the mattresses you are looking at … or any other mattress where all the materials and components are not exactly the same. To recap you can see that the materials and thicknesses are different.
(10”) height (your previous discontinued mattress)
2" Talalay (28 ILD)
2" Dunlop (32 ILD)
6" of a 2 lb convoluted polyfoam core (around 32 ILD)

(11”) Luma all latex is
3" Talalay in either 19, 28, or 36 ILD or 3" Dunlop in 24, 30, or 38 ILD
2" Dunlop (30 ILD)
6" Dunlop (38 ILD]

And the Nest (medium) is
1.5" 1.5 lb foam
3" Dunlop (27 ILD)
6" Dunlop (36 ILD)

All of the layers of foam work together in a completed mattress, and there would be no way for me to tell how each layer of foam is impacting the comfort that you feel on each of these units, as only you can feel that. Also, thickness and firmness are interdependent when it comes to the sleeper's overall support/comfort. With a 12" mattress ... the firmness would need to go up (than what you had for a 10” thick mattress) on average because thicker mattresses will "act" softer for most people. If you make changes to one of the specs (such as the layer thickness of the top layer) ... then you may also need to make other changes to the other layers to compensate.


Understood - so it seems based on this information the Luma may be a fair bit softer than what I currently have. To be clear I do not need (or even recognize the possibility as likely) to match my current mattress exactly, it is more to provide an indication of something that currently works ok for us.

The above said, after discussing with the folks at Luma I did decide to purchase their Latex Sleep System with the medium (28 ILD) Talalay top layer. I also decided to buy the foundation that they sell which has slats that are 2.75 inches apart, along with a metal bed frame with headboard brackets from Tuft and Needle which looked a bit nicer than the one's available on Amazon for not much less money. Luma offers a 100 night trial period as well as the option to swap the top layer for something different, so if it doesn't work there is little risk. I wouldn't have found them without this website so thank you again for the great resource!

Cheers!

Noah
07 Feb 2021 10:12
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey undisclosed,

Welcome back to the Mattress Underground :) ! Thanks for your question.

I am still rocking my T&N 10 from when T&N first released it and it's showing some age but that is not what I am here for. I am here to finally get a nice frame.. I've been searching a long time and wanted a tatamiroom frame back when I first bought my 10 but on a publishing salary, a $600 bedframe was out of the question.


Great that your T&N is still going strong, undisclosed! It's nice to hear a sleep story with a "Happy Ending" and perhaps when you have time another day, you could drop us a line and tell TMU subscribers about your thoughts on life with your Tuft & Needle 10 mattress.

I am aware of the platform bed links and the whole thread discussion related to it. I wanted to know if anyone here as experience (long term, more than 2 years) with the tatamiroom beds since they only offer a 1 year warranty.


While you are waiting for consumer response to your question ( I am not personally familiar with Tatami Room products), lets take a construction peek at your candidates.

I have my eyes on these two models:

The Tatamiroom Wakayama in king (if I ever decide to upgrade my bed to a king, I won't need to change my bedframe). tatamiroom.mybigcommerce.com/wakayama-platform-bed-natural-finish/


The king Wakayama Platform Bed construction uses solid hardwood/ Parawood featuring a center support with two center support legs and 14 wooden slats positioned less than 2" apart. One detail that you may want to research is whether anyone has experienced "creaking" or "squeaking" sounds that sometimes wood-to-wood contacts on the bed can produce with movement. The construction overall appears sound; however, a couple of caveats post-purchase to consider: from Tatimi Room's site, the return policy is a full refund 30 days within receipt of shipment, less shipping and handling fees, so if you're fairly confident you won't be returning the platform bed, this shouldn't be a deal breaker. I couldn't find any mention of a product warranty, so for a purchase with this size price tag, you would want to contact Tatimi and ask what (if any, you mention knowledge of a year warranty) future recourse would you have should you encounter problems and get those details in writing for your records.

OR their Zen in the queen/king tatamiroom.mybigcommerce.com/zen-platform-bed-honey-oak/ <-- I am apprensive about this one because don't those legs look tiny for a bedframe? If the front and back panels were flat all along the length I wouldn't question it but the decision to have just small nubs for feet on what looks like a thinner piece of wood compared to bed leg/post is questionable to me.


I was somewhat underwhelmed by the product information/ lack thereof for the Zen Platform bed. The "nubs" for feet appear to be a cutaway design element of both the headboard and footboard and not a separate thinner piece of wood. It would be helpful to see the same type assembly diagram that the Wakayama Platform bed's description included to verify all of the construction specs. From the product images, the Zen appears to have only one center support leg vs. the Wakayama's two; that may or may not be a concern, depending on the overall weight the platform would be supporting. I couldn't verify weight capacity's for either of the Tatami platform beds from their site.

The Thuma I only know of because of their Apple like marketing techniques but my understanding is it's an American company jumping on the Japanese home decor bandwagon and catering to a Western audience that is concerned with eco friendly, offgasing, etc. Thoughts? THANKS!


The Thuma platform bed seems an interesting option. It incorporates Japanese-influenced design and uses a variety of upcycled and repurposed construction materials. I watched the set up video from their site, and that they use no tools, a simple process, and one-person management looks appealing. A low profile design incorporating 9" of storage space underneath is a nice touch too. Their rounded corner leg design is thoughtful as some consumers have mentioned toe/ shin stubs with some of the squared off legs. The slats are spaced a little less than 3" apart, making it suitable for your T&N 10. The platform bed is constructed of "repurposed" rubberwood, the slats are reinforced with eco-fi felt for sound reduction and the bed specs say it has a +1,500 lb. weight capacity. Thurma offers a 100 night risk free trial and while they state "The Bed and The Nightstand are built to last and backed with a lifetime warranty," no warranty details are listed on their site, so again, you would want to seek verification and written details for your records prior to purchase.

Any of these 3 platform beds should be suitable for your 10" T&N mattress. I always like to remind consumers when shopping for a new foundation to review their mattress warranty as each manufacturer will state what foundations will best provide optimal performance for the life of their product. From Tuft & Needle's warranty page : Please note that “normal wear” assumes and requires that your mattress is continuously supported by a proper foundation sufficient to support the distributed weight of your body and the mattress itself. If you have questions about whether the foundation you are using or intend to use is adequate, please contact [email protected]. Hope this helps with your research and perhaps some consumers will stop by and share their experiences with you soon ;) .

Thanks,
Sensei
04 Feb 2021 22:19
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi noahsi.

I do not think going the custom route is what I want to do at the moment - I am already testing my partners patience with the deliberations on the mattress and platform!


Understood! Thankfully, many great options exist that are ready to take home and sleep on.

Is it fair to say the version with the 28 ild Talalay topper would be pretty similar to what I have now? (Maybe a little softer)? The middle layer is a little softer in the Luma and I don’t know how the latex base support layer in the Luma compares to the foam in my current Brooklyn bedding mattress.... Do you think the Luma would be a bit more plush than the nest?


This wouldn’t be “fair to say” regarding the mattresses you are looking at … or any other mattress where all the materials and components are not exactly the same. To recap you can see that the materials and thicknesses are different.
(10”) height (your previous discontinued mattress)
2" Talalay (28 ILD)
2" Dunlop (32 ILD)
6" of a 2 lb convoluted polyfoam core (around 32 ILD)

(11”) Luma all latex is
3" Talalay in either 19, 28, or 36 ILD or 3" Dunlop in 24, 30, or 38 ILD
2" Dunlop (30 ILD)
6" Dunlop (38 ILD]

And the Nest (medium) is
1.5" 1.5 lb foam
3" Dunlop (27 ILD)
6" Dunlop (36 ILD)

All of the layers of foam work together in a completed mattress, and there would be no way for me to tell how each layer of foam is impacting the comfort that you feel on each of these units, as only you can feel that. Also, thickness and firmness are interdependent when it comes to the sleeper's overall support/comfort. With a 12" mattress ... the firmness would need to go up (than what you had for a 10” thick mattress) on average because thicker mattresses will "act" softer for most people. If you make changes to one of the specs (such as the layer thickness of the top layer) ... then you may also need to make other changes to the other layers to compensate.

Every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting materials) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you are able to find another mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials, components, cover and quilting, layer thicknesses, layer firmnesses, and overall design (which would be fairly unlikely) then there really isn't a reliable way to match one mattress to another one in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) based on the specifications of the mattresses (even assuming that you can find out all the specifications you would need for both mattresses you are comparing in the first place). This being said you are on the right track by seeking guidance from an experienced manufacturer or retailer, who would be the ones to best approximate a mattress feel based on all the specs and your personal needs and preferences you may provide. post #2 here.

Because there are so many objective and subjective elements involved in matching one mattress to another and because different materials or components can have the same quality in terms of density and durability and even the same design in terms of layer thickness but still have different performance properties or "subjective feel" ... matching one mattress to another from the perspective of a mattress designer and from the perspective of a consumer can be as much an art as a science. Even if say 8 out of 10 people agree that one mattress is a close approximation to another in one or more ways in terms of feel and performance ... there will always be those who don't agree because their perceptions, preferences, or sensitivities are different.

The Luma website says the warranty can be voided if the support platform is inappropriate but they do not define what that means.


My recommendation would be to reach out and ask them. This is the best way to be sure you're not voiding your warranty. Generally, in the case of latex, the main criteria for most manufacturers concerns the distance between slats that should be no more than 3" apart (or preferably less). Placing it on the floor would qualify as a supportive surface to make sure that it doesn't sink through any gap.

Would something like this foundation be appropriate: www.tuftandneedle.com/basics/box-foundation/ ? This one the slats are 3.5 inches apart. I’m not sure if the extra space will make much of a difference or not.


Again, an all-latex mattress should not be placed on a slatted base with gaps larger than 3" apart (preferably less) The integrity of the latex is compromised and you may lose some of the supportive qualities you would otherwise benefit from on a proper base. I’d also make sure that the slatted bed has a center beam with good support to the floor (in sizes above a twin) so it doesn't sag.

I hope this clarifies your doubts.

Phoenix
04 Feb 2021 15:34
  • NikkiTMU
  • NikkiTMU's Avatar
Hi Spen55.

Energex is a high-quality polyfoam, one of the newer generation " high-performance polyfoams ." The foam is also more immediate in its response and not have the "hug" and "memory foam feel" quality that many people dislike. These high-performance polyfoams tend to be extremely durable and some of them are engineered to provide feels that are somewhat similar to latex, others similar to memory foam, and others simply versions unto themselves.

According to the manufacturer of Energex foam, it "bridges the gap between latex and memory foam by combining the superior pressure mapping of visco with the energetic feel of latex. It is ideally suited in bedding as a transition layer between the surface, which is comprised of memory foam and the base layer."

I hope this helps!
NikkiTMU
02 Feb 2021 09:12
  • noahsi
  • noahsi's Avatar
Hello Phoenix and thank you for the detailed response. Yes that was a typo in my until a post.. I meant “now” rather than “not”.

Thank you also for finding the specs of my current mattress.

I do not think going the custom route is what I want to do at the moment - I am already testing my partners patience with the deliberations on the mattress and platform!

That said, the luma all latex mattress is 6 inch 38 ild Dunlop support layer with a 2 inch ild 30 Dunlop transition layer topped by the customers choice of 3 inches of either 19, 28, or 36 ild Talalay or 3 inches of 24, 30, 38 Dunlop latex. Is it fair to say the version with the 28 ild Talalay topper would be pretty similar to what I have now? (Maybe a little softer)? The middle layer is a little softer in the Luma and I don’t know how the latex base support layer in the Luma compares to the foam in my current Brooklyn bedding mattress.

I did test out the nest all latex in medium and firm. The firm was much too firm and the medium felt a little firm. The medium Nest is 6 inch 36 ild Dunlop topped by 3 inch of 27 ild Dunlop with 1.5 inch of 1.5 lb quilting foam as the upper most layer. In the store the salesperson told me the medium was 30ild Dunlop on the upper layer but the 27 number is what I received over email from their customer support team. Do you think the Luma would be a bit more plush than the nest?

I didn’t realize I could simply place the mattress on the floor. The Luma website says the warranty can be voided if the support platform is inappropriate but they do not define what that means. Their slatted wood foundations have 14 2.5 inch slats placed 2.75 inches apart, but I do not particularly like the style of it. I don’t think my current platform bed is the issue with my back - I have some back injuries spanning 10 years ago and have intermittent residual soreness. I really just care about having something supportive.

Would something like this foundation be appropriate: www.tuftandneedle.com/basics/box-foundation/ ? This one the slats are 3.5 inches apart. I’m not sure if the extra space will make much of a difference or not.
21 Jan 2021 10:28
  • Mattrebuild
  • Mattrebuild's Avatar
I've been working on the zoning design to figure out how I want to arrange the zones on mine so I was doing a bit more research at lunch.

I came across these videos which are super helpful because you just don't find may folks cutting open better quality mattresses to see what's inside. It's always good to have plenty of ideas to draw on so we can improve on our own DIY designs too. Here's a whole bunch of links where these guys cut open all sorts of mattresses and I learned a bunch from watching them, hopefully you do too. Some of these brands/models I've never heard of but each is somewhat unique so it's great to see some of the designs and why they might have failed over time.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xrDUGktBbc The Anatomy of a Mattress: Tempur-Pedic Cloud Elite
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Esr84na9Xi0 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Stearns and Foster Reserve
www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-DHeu6lHM0 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Tuft and Needle
www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwHUfA64A1I The Anatomy of a Mattress: WESTIN HEAVENLY BED (Simmons Beautyrest)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdCPxPGuzAY The Anatomy of a Mattress: Intellibed
www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWqLLo3h7P4 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Stearns and Foster Luxury Firm
www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HyGzSaiI88 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Purple Mattress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsKZvjVUjEE The Anatomy of a Mattress: Tempurpedic Cloud Luxe
www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdC2zLQRjR4 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Royal-Pedic Latex Mattress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVZRa4n5hXg The Anatomy of a Mattress: Ikea Latex Mattress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtCcPS5Za8g The Anatomy of a Mattress: Comfortpedic "Latex" Mattress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gw9Qg58Lfo4 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Nectar Mattress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsqoH3Djzq0 The Anatomy of a Mattress: Serta Vera Wang $5000 Latex Mattress

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bg24s5oAk7I Helpful breakdown on latex types, quality and densities
www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bNXN9P-ccM Talalay vs Dunlop: What's The Difference?
13 Dec 2020 12:21
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey Evan,

Welcome to the Mattress Underground :) ! Thanks for your question.

I'm currently trying out a Sleep Ez Latex Hybrid Mattress. Been sleeping on it for about a month. When it first arrived I took an excellent nap on the firmer side and was excited for a night's rest. Unfortunately I've only gotten about two nights of sleep where I woke up feeling good and not in some pain (some nights I have trouble getting comfortable throughout the night). And one of the good nights included using my wool topper on the firmer side. So basically I find the firmer side too firm especially for my side and the softer side I feel like I sink in too much. The pain I'm getting is usually sore shoulders and lower back pain. I talked with sleep ez and they suggested I try a medium 2" talalay topper for the firm side and I've been giving that a go the last couple nights, but it still doesn't feel right. I weigh about 195 lbs and am 6ft tall. Usually a back sleeper, with occasional side sleeping.


Thanks for your support of trusted member Sleep EZ . Sorry to learn of your sore shoulders/ lower back pain discomfort, Evan; is this a carry over from your previous mattress or a new development? Good to hear that you have reached out to Sleep EZ and attempted to resolve your comfort issues with their help.

I talked with sleep ez and they suggested I try a medium 2" talalay topper for the firm side and I've been giving that a go the last couple nights, but it still doesn't feel right. I weigh about 195 lbs and am 6ft tall. Usually a back sleeper, with occasional side sleeping.


If you found the 2” dunlop latex side of the Select Sleep Latex Hybrid too firm for your side sleeping profile and the 3” plush side too soft/ sinking in too much, it would seem that the 2” medium Talalay topper would be closer to the feeling of comfort you seek. Could you describe briefly what “still doesn’t feel quite right” means? Also in terms of your body profile, how is your weight distributed? What are you using as a foundation?

My previous/ actual current mattress was a cheaper Mattress Firm mattress that I ended ups getting a wool topper for and eventually adding another wool topper so I could feel comfortable. I’ve had that mattress about 3 years and did get a good night’s rest often, but it had started to feel like it wasn’t supporting me well and also always felt too firm in a way hence the toppers. I believe from looking up it specs they are as follows:

Quilting Layers:
• Fire retardant fiber
• 2 Layers of 7/8” Super Soft Quilt Foam
• 7/16” Super Soft Quilt Foam

Comfort Layers:
• 1.75” High Density Soft Support Foam
• Gel Infused Memory Foam Zone
• Versare
• 1.75” Shock Absorbing Base Foam

Support System:
• 528/650 F/E Lura-Flex Coils
• 5.5” Foam Encased Rails

Which Mattress Firm mattress do you have and what size is it, Evan? Besides feeling “too firm”, are there qualities that you did like about the mattress? Do you like the feel of memory foam/ HD poly foam as opposed to latex? Generally speaking, memory foam’s slow response nature of forming itself around your body’s profile, creating the feeling of “sinking into” the mattress can be appealing to those who do not move around or change positions often during the night/ If possible, you may consider having someone snap some pics of you in both back and side sleeping positions on both mattresses to get a visual of how your shoulders and back are aligning in each case and get a better idea of where the pressure point impacts are on what parts of the mattresses.

I know y’all don’t five specific recommendations usually but I just wondering what direction I might wanna look in next. I’ve also tried the tuft and needle memory foam mattress and a Brentwood Home Oceano memory foam hybrid in the last year na wasn’t a juice fan and they both felt too hard for me.


Yes unfortunately we cannot give specific recommendations as only you can “feel” what you feel on any given mattress and there are countless options available out there. We are happy to guide you through the research process and offer thought-starting encouragement for consideration. Also, feel free to query any of the TMU trusted members as they have many years experience pairing consumers with best-suited mattress choices, based on their deep understanding of their component specialties.

I’m somewhat limited by my local options living in Bloomington, Indiana and haven’t found a mattress I thoroughly enjoy locally, but would be open to some travel. I did found one local cheaper mattress that felt pretty comfortable, but I’m worried about quality and how long it would last. Its specs listed online were:


.75” high-density quilt foam
2.5” high-density body foam
High-density gel memory foam for lumbar support
.25” firming pad
13-gauge Bonnell coil unit with 390 individual power packed wrapped coils

This mattress may have felt pretty comfortable initially, but considering the specs and your slightly higher BMI , long-term durability could be a consideration here. If you prefer the feel of innersprings in a mattress, a good quality pocket support core is a better option long-term from a performance standpoint.

Anyway, I’ve learned a lot perusing the forum and. Appreciate any and all help.


Thanks for your kind words on the site, they are much appreciated! You are doing a good job with your mattress testing and research, Evan and your patience will be rewarded with a mattress more suited to your preferences. Looking forward to hearing which way you decide to go and best of luck.

Thanks,
Sensei
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