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Searched for: Tuft Needle
10 Dec 2017 11:44
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi makesunshine,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Congratulation on your new BB Signature mattress! :cheer: I’m happy that your initial impression is a positive one.

Point elasticity refers to the ability of the material (foam layer) to conform to the curves of the body with minimal disturbance/pull of the areas of the foam layer around it, so it contours quite finely where mass is applied. A smaller area can compress and contour with less impact upon or resistance from the areas of the foam surrounding the mass being applied. Memory foam, latex, and many of the newer plush “high performance” polyfoams tend to be quite point elastic.

Phoenix
09 Dec 2017 13:14
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi bknox3,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Your question is common, with many people trying to decide between the many boxed-bed offerings available.

The first thing to focus upon is learning about mattress componentry and how to go about selecting a mattress. To do that, I recommend that you start by reading the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

Read so many reviews on Reddit and other places and still doesn't help.


I agree with you 100%. While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

I am a side sleeper 5'7 150lb.


Here’s a good article that speaks to different sleeping postures and things to look for.

Also curious if I buy one of these will I need to buy the foundation they sell to keep it all together or is just a box spring fine?


You’ll always want to check with each manufacturer as to what is appropriate for their mattresses, not only for support but also to maintain a valid warranty. Most manufacturers recommend some sort of a solid foundation, with slats spaced anywhere from 2” – 5” apart (it varies by manufacturer and model). A true “box spring” would be an active unit with coils that flexes, and generally would be contraindicated by the manufactures you mentioned. There’s much more about foundations and the differences between them in this thread .

All of the brands you mentioned have been discussed quite a bit here on the forum (Brooklyn Bedding and Novosbed are site members here, which means that I think highly of them). If you want to perform a forum search on these or any other brand, just click on this link and enter the name of the brand you might be curious about.

Boxed-bed “Simplified Choice” mattresses are discussed in greater detail in this thread . The specifications for the Tuft and Needle, Casper, Leesa Brooklyn Bedding Signature, and Novosbed are all listed in that thread.

If you have more specific questions after reading through this, feel free to post them back here and I’ll do my best to be assistive.

Phoenix
09 Dec 2017 09:55
  • bknox3
  • bknox3's Avatar
I am torn between Tuft and Needle, Casper, Leesa, Brooklyn Bedding, Novos on which I should get. Read so many reviews on Reddit and other places and still doesn't help. I am a side sleeper 5'7 150lb. Also curious if I buy one of these will I need to buy the foundation they sell to keep it all together or is just a box spring fine? Please help :)
08 Dec 2017 15:09
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi BreakAes,

While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

You can see my comments about many of the so-called "review sites" (which are really just revenue sites that know little about mattresses or mattress materials) in post #11 here and in posts #4 and #6 here . As such, I don't compile a list nor recommend such sites to the members here on the forum (which is also why I deleted the links on your original post), and I would also caution anyone to take a very skeptical approach in using thee types of sites when they are looking for a mattress that is likely to be the best choice for them on an individual basis.

If you still personally feel the need to visit such sites, all you have to do is perform an internet search of mattress reviews and you'll be welcomed with a plethora of sites set up by anyone with the few dollars necessary to register their own domain name and become a self-proclaimed mattress review expert, when in fact most of them are simply glorified affiliate marketers.

Phoenix
25 Nov 2017 11:18
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi CapeCodKayaker,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

All your information has been a big help as I have been struggling for days trying to select mattresses for an adjustable bed frame that we will be buying very soon.


I’m happy the information here has been helpful to you.

So many ads combine memory foam mattresses with the frames but I am now leaning more towards latex.


An all-latex mattress can be a good choice for use in combination with an adjustable bed base, as it puts up with the demands of bending and specific weight concentrations that are common with adjustable beds.

One of your member retailers has a nice mattress that uses hyper-elastic foam. I haven't seen that in your tutorials and wonder if it is another type of memory foam?


“Hyper-elastic” is an actual term used to describe products and foam that can put up with larger strains and deformations. The foam is also more immediate in its response and is also tends to be extremely durable. This is sometimes used to describe some of the newer generation of high performance polyfoams . Some of these polyfoams are engineered to provide feels that are somewhat similar to latex, others similar to memory foam, and others simply versions unto themselves. TitanFlex may be one of these high performance polyfoams you’ve seen mentioned on the site described as hyper elastic.

If you want to delve into “rabbit hole” of testing polyfoams and the attempt to quantify the hyper elastic nature of this material, you can read more about the Ogden material model here , or these tow studies ( here and here ) that attempt to apply and modify this model to polyfoams.

Do the USA made memory foam mattresses have an odor like the ones from China?


The amount of odor with any memory foam will vary by such things as the chemical composition and state of cure before the foam was shipped or assembled within the mattress, the humidity in the factory when the foam was poured, as well as if the foam was compressed and sealed for shipment and how long (if at all) it was kept in this state and allowed to have the odor dissipate before being placed within a mattress. The amount of odor can vary by formulation, manufacturer and country of origin, with wide variations found within each category. Foams compressed and sealed for longer periods of time, such as when shipping in containers over long distances, can have stronger initial odors as they may not have been allowed to “breathe” much before be assembled within a mattress.

My husband has a very strong sense of smell and feel that would not be good for him. Do the latex mattresses have an odor problem?


Many people are sensitive to polyfoam and specifically memory foam (I once had a reaction to a memory foam topper, even though I don’t have Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS)). If you are very sensitive to odors, as some people are with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), any odor, even one that isn’t harmful, can be unpleasant. Latex odor is described by most people as “semi-sweet” or “vanilla-like”, and it tends to dissipate quite quickly in a new mattress.

Also, are the latex mattresses easier to get out of than the memory foam ones?


While all of the layers of a mattress will contribute overall to the ease of repositioning, latex is more resilient and returns more energy than memory foam, and most people would agree that a mattress using primarily latex in the upper comfort layers will be easier to “get out of” than one using mostly memory foam in the upper comfort layers.

Phoenix
20 Nov 2017 16:35
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi gardenguy,

After contacting Sleep On Latex it was suggested omitting the medium firmness entirely and just going with 5 inches of 20 ILD, since their medium 30 ILD would be so close to the ILD of my base foam that it would not add to the comfort factor


That could make very good sense - they have an excellent point.

I suppose I was under the assumption, and maybe this is from looking at so many online mattress constructions, that a transition layer with an ild between the base and top layer would make the feel less abrupt. However, I suppose with latex being a completely different "animal" than poly foams, this isn't necessarily the case always. Do you think a transition layer is less needed in latex Phoenix, or would you say that may be more beneficial in an all poly or memory foam bed?


There’s much more information about how all of the layers of a mattress work together in this post . I wouldn’t get too “caught up” in the labelling of certain layers of the need to have a certain number of layers within a mattress. Latex has the ability to firm up as you sink into it more deeply, as this is discussed in more detail in this post , and because of this higher compression modulus, especially with Dunlop latex, you can start out with an initial soft feel (softer layer above “bending into” this layer gradually) and then as more weight is applied the comfort can firm up and become more supportive/firmer, so in some cases a single piece of latex can act similarly to two layers of progressive ILDs laminated together. Without getting too far down the rabbit hole, I speak to this a bit in both the progressive and differential construction articles.

Would using a 3 inch -15 ild layer in the top and a 2 inch-20 ild layer below that(both in dunlop) make much of a difference in feel?


I’m not sure what you’re comparing this to. If you mean would the 5” 15/20 ILD combination feel different from the 5” 20 ILD? If that is the case, most people would be able to notice this difference and would say that the 15/20 combination would feel softer.

If I truly want a pillowy type feel on top (similar to 10 ild soft memory foam) should I be looking for Talalay instead of Dunlop to begin with? Or should I be looking for low ILD hr poly foams. *


In the very soft feels, Talalay at the 14/15 ILD range is usually the most popular. You can also look for convoluted latex layers which will be quite plush. There are some sources for latex componentry here .

I don’t have a listing of what latex distributor carries which particular softness currently (and I don’t have time to comb through that right now -sorry), but the softest you’ll tend to find in Dunlop would be in the 55 kg/M3 range. 65 kg/M3 is more common.

There are some newer generations of high performance polyfoams that are higher in density but can be made quite plush. Those would generally be the only ultra soft types of polyfoams I would consider.

Phoenix
20 Nov 2017 16:03
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi JJ85,

But I'm not sure I have the knowledge to compare their layers.


I provided you links in my previous reply about learning of the componentry within a mattress. The steps aren’t too difficult. To help you out a bit, I’ll list here in more complete detail my suggestions for selecting a mattress.

The first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

You can perform a forum search on any of the brands you mentioned and see where there were discussed previously here on the forum.

The Sapira mattress uses pocketed springs. The spring unit has a 1” layer of 1.8 lb 32 ILD polyfoam on the top and bottom of it, and then above that is 1.5” Of 4 lb 9 ILD memory foam and 1.5” of 3.65 lb 20 ILD Avena “ high performance” polyfoam . For most individuals there would be no “Red flags” with these materials, but I would issue a “slight caution” for those of a higher BMI for the 4 lb memory foam.

The Kaya Sleep is another of the newer “boxed bed” mattresses and hasn’t been discussed previously here on the forum. It uses pocketed springs, on top of which is 1” 2 lb polyfoam, 2” 4lb memory foam, and 1” 5 lb “high performance” polyfoam. For most individuals there would be no “Red flags” with these materials, but I would issue a “slight caution” for those of a higher BMI for the 4 lb memory foam.

Tomorrow Sleep two different comfort offerings:
Medium firm
1" 3.5lb Memory Foam Layer
1/2” 2.5lb Air Cooled Comfort foam layer with Gel (not sure if this is memory foam or poly foam)
1.5” Dynamic Response Foam Layer (I believe 2.6 lb)
6" coils at the bottom for additional support."

Medium soft
1” 4.8 lb Viscoelastic (memory foam)
2” 2.5 lb foam layer with Gel (not sure if this is polyfoam or memory foam)
6” Series coil
6” x 3” Foam rails with Side Ventilation
1” thin base foam layer which the coils rest upon

The Medium Firm uses a total of 3” of comfort materials, with the memory foam being a bit lower than what I would normally recommend (3.5 lb vs. 4 lb) . The Medium Soft uses a higher density memory foam, and the polyfoam layer beneath that uses a better density of foam.

How would each feel?


There are no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science. Which is a long-winded way to say that unfortunately I can’t predict how one of these mattresses might feel to you, and that can only be determined through your own personal testing.

Phoenix
19 Nov 2017 07:05
  • dian
  • dian's Avatar
Not sure of the cost now, but we have had our Tuft and Needle for about 1.5 years and it has held up very well (and we are not skinny people). At first it felt very form, but has softened up a bit and is extremely comfortable. We love it.
18 Nov 2017 18:29
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi ArielHunter,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I’m sorry to hear whatever mattress you bought on amazon didn’t work out well for you. :(

I want to get the most durable mattress I can in my price range. I'm able to spend at max $700. Ideally I want latex because it seems to be the most durable.


While you don't mention what size you're looking for, for those that have a more restricted budget then post #4 here and the posts it links to also include many of the better lower budget online options I'm aware of as well. It’s a good start.

Also do the tuftandneedle mattresses last ?
Lastly, is a latex and foam hybrid mattress worth it from a durability standpoint?


How long a mattress “lasts” is related to many factors, most notably the quality of the componentry within the mattress ( see this article ). You can find the specifications of the T&N mattress in the simplified choice thread here . As for “hybrid mattresses”, durability would again be determined by the componentry within any mattress you were considering. See this article about mattress specifications that you need to know .

If you have any questions about specifications or certain products you discover, feel free to post back on the forum and I’ll do my best to be assistive.

Phoenix
18 Nov 2017 13:17
  • ArielHunter
  • ArielHunter's Avatar
Hi everyone, so I have been searching for a mattress for aboiut a week. I am in need of a new one badly and quickly. Amazon is picking up a crappy mattress a got from them that didn't even last 1 month before giving me back problems.

I want to get the most durable mattress I can in my price range. I'm able to spend at max $700. Ideally I want latex because it seems to be the most durable.

I am able to adjust to a firm or plush mattress and I sleep in all different positions.

Does anyone have any suggestions of mattresses in my price range that are 100% latex or a compatible durable material?

Also do the tuftandneedle mattresses last ?

Lastly, is a latex and foam hybrid mattress worth it from a durability standpoint?
16 Nov 2017 12:50
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jadespider,

The Eight Sleep mattress has been mentioned previously here on the forum. You can read more about it in post #44 here . They’ve expanded their lineup since that last post.

Your specifications are just a bit incorrect. The top layer is one of the new breed of what I term “ high performance” polyfoams , and it is 2” of 12 ILD 3 lb density. They list is as “latex-like” on their web site, but it is polyfoam. Beneath that is 2” of 11 ILD 4 lb memory foam. Under this is a 2” piece of 22 ILD 1.8 lb poly foam and then a 4” piece of 35 ILD 1.8 lb polyfoam (these two layers are not memory foam as you had listed). These would be good quality materials for most, but I would provide a caution for someone in the "above 200 pounds or so range" with the 1.8 lb support core and the 4 lb memory foam. I’m not quite sure what you’re referencing regarding a BMI score of 250.

When choosing between latex and memory foam, like so many things, it can come down to simple personal preferences. Latex has an unusual combination of surface softness and deeper firmness/support that comes from its elasticity, it's point elasticity (ability to conform to the shape of a body) and its compression modulus (the ability to get firmer faster with deeper compression than other types of foam). This means that it can enhance the pressure relieving layers above it because of its surface softness and point elasticity but it is also very supportive and can "stop" the heavier parts of the body from sinking in too deeply. It is also very resilient (it returns a high percentage of the energy of compression instead of absorbing it like memory foam which has very low resilience) so it can enhance the "feel" of the mattress by making it more responsive and more adaptable to different body profiles and sleeping positions rather than the less responsive feeling of memory foam or the stiffer and less adaptable characteristics of polyfoam. Latex is also a very durable material (it's the most durable of all the foam types) so it can add to the durability of a mattress compared to other materials but the deeper layers of a mattress have less effect on mattress durability (a mattress will soften and break down from the top down) and more of an effect on performance and support/alignment so this would be less of a factor in its use. Some people prefer the more “buoyant” feel of latex, while others prefer the motion-deadening feel of memory foam. Regardless of what you choose, make sure you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

Phoenix
15 Nov 2017 21:00
  • AJohnson
  • AJohnson's Avatar
I personally tried the Tuft & Needle and also wasn't impressed with it either. The custom foam they use is sinky, but doesn't mold to my body enough for support. it felt like the depression caused by my butt and back pushed the foam down and left my lumbar area unsupported.

i.imgur.com/vNrWG9U.png

that drawing is exaggerated but that's how it kind of felt for me.

you could certainly add some memory foam like you did to help fill in and support those gaps, but 2" of memory foam on top of 3" of T&N's sinky foam could definitely cause some uncomfortable hammocking that could hurt your back, which is what I suspect happened.

since you like the memory foam, I'd hold on to the 2" 5lb mem foam topper (and see if you can return the 3lb one and get a refund), and put it on top of a 2" latex topper (I'm guessing 24, or 28 ILD, depending on your BMI and firmness preference), and then put those both on top of a 6" polyfoam core .

if you don't want to mess with any of that though, all the mattresses Phoenix posted all look like good options. but if you're on a tighter budget (I was, that's why I tried the Tuft & Needle) also look into the Addable mattress . It has 2" of 4lb memory foam on top of 2" of 20 ILD 1.8lb transition foam and a high quality 6" 2.0lb core. but if you want to get as close to your old tempurpedic as possible, it'd probably be the Christeli or the Novosbed. The Christeli in particular has a special zoned support core, which is interesting.

(hey phoenix, you should add the Christeli to the bed in a box pinned megathread's list)
15 Nov 2017 16:41
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi catfishbear,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :) And I’m sorry to hear about your pain issues. :(

Nine years ago my wife and I managed to find the *perfect* mattress for us. It was a floor model of a 9" Tempur pedic for just $700. Sadly, it recently died and was sagging over an inch in the center.
I had no idea how hard it would be to find another like it.
It had (i think) 3" of dense memory foam over 6" of support. It felt like a brick at first in the winter, until it warmed up, and then it was heavenly. At the time we got it I was seeing a chiropractor regularly for pain which stopped immediately when we got our "sand cloud".


There were a few older models that you may have purchased. If you have the Tempurpedic Original then it would have 2.8" of their firmer 5.3 lb memory foam over a 5" polyfoam base. If you have the Tempurpedic Classic then it would have the same 2.8" of their 5.3 lb memory foam and another .8" of a softer version of the same density memory foam over this and the same 5" polyfoam base layer.

Both of these have been discontinued and the closest they currently have would be the Contour Supreme which is currently the firmest mattress they make and has 1" of the softer 5.3 lb memory foam over 2.4" of the firmer 5.3 lb memory foam over a 3” + 5.1” polyfoam base layer. They rate this as "firm" but it's softer than the original was.

The Tempurpedic memory foam is firmer, more temperature sensitive, and slower responding than most of the current memory foam on the market but the closest you would likely come in "general" terms would be about 3" of 5 lb memory foam over a 5" or 6" firm polyfoam base layer, but this would depend to some degree on the specifics of the memory foam that was in the mattress because there are many different types of memory foam even of the same density.

Of course there are some other manufacturers that use similar or better quality/density foams and sell for much less than the Tempurpedic and would be well worth talking to to ask them how their mattresses would compare to the Contour Supreme or which one that was in your budget range may come the closest. For example, site member Christeli offers their Versailles that approximates (is not an exact copy) the comfort of the Contour Supreme. Novosbed also offers a “firm” version of their memory foam bed which they also offer as a comparison to the Contour Supreme. Memory Foam Comfort also specializes in customizable memory foam mattresses. This would be a good few places to start your search should you desire to find something “close” to your old mattress, but at a more competitive price. Those companies are members of this site which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency.

As you’ve already discovered, the Tuft and Needle you purchased is a very different product from your old Tempurpedic, and even with the memory foam topper on it there would be a considerable difference in feel, not only in the T&N mattress but also in the memory foam topper you purchased as compared to the memory foam in your old Tempurpedic product.

If you’re attempting you find something “similar” to your old Tempurpedic, this would be my best advice of places to start looking.

Phoenix
15 Nov 2017 13:07
  • catfishbear
  • catfishbear's Avatar
Nine years ago my wife and I managed to find the *perfect* mattress for us. It was a floor model of a 9" Tempur pedic for just $700. Sadly, it recently died and was sagging over an inch in the center.
I had no idea how hard it would be to find another like it.
It had (i think) 3" of dense memory foam over 6" of support. It felt like a brick at first in the winter, until it warmed up, and then it was heavenly. At the time we got it I was seeing a chiropractor regularly for pain which stopped immediately when we got our "sand cloud".

Fast forward to now.
I am back to seeing a Chiropractor multiple times a week. :(

I am 5'8" and 215 lb with a "female pattern of weight distribution" i.e. large thighs and butt. I am a side/stomach sleeper.
She is 5'4" and 125 lb and a side/back sleeper.
We are both 40 years old, relatively sedentary with broad shoulders.
After the Tempur Pedic died we bought a Tuft & Needle out of desperation to take advantage of Amazon's fast shipping. My lower back pain eased slightly but now I am suffering shoulder and neck pain as well.
After 2 weeks with the Tuft & Needle we visited a mattress store, ready to give up and drop $3000 on another "sand cloud". She preferred all the Tempurpedic Cloud models, I delighted in the Contour models, and none were quite like the one we bought 9 years ago.
So we went home dejected and confused. I spent hours reading and reading, creating spreadsheets and doing comparisons only to realize there is no perfect mattress for us both anymore. So I ordered 2 toppers, both 2" memory foam, one 3 lb and one 5 lb. The 3 lb was too soft for me, so we switched out to the 5 lb which the wife was happy with as well.
The first night was great, then I started getting lower back pain just as bad as ever. We took the topper off again in the hopes I would eventually adjust to the Tuft and Needle but I am not sleeping now, and when I wake from the little sleep I do get, I am in pain, shoulders, neck and lower back.

We really can't afford to go out and buy 2 single Tempur pedic mattresses but I am getting desperate enough to be strongly considering it.

Any help or advice would be gratefully received, and likely read at 4 am when I wake up in pain again.
14 Nov 2017 16:28
  • Random84
  • Random84's Avatar
Pheonix,

I signed up basically to say this (and later on ask more questions): you deftly avoid promoting any one brand or mattress, and equally skillfully avoid making any specific recommendations - and I understand why!

I appreciate your mattress forum and your dedication to helping us all try to figure out the minefield of mattress "products" that seem to involve much more advertising than products unique to a specific brand. I've discovered several boutique options thanks to this forum and some of your advice - unfortunately I don't know if I'm any closer to finding an appropriate mattress! lol

But to my point: to remain neutral, you emphasize personal preference, physiology, etc which is certainly valid - but you follow this up by suggesting we all have an in-depth conversation with each respective mattress company to see if their products are a good fit in firmness and features... and this is where I start scratching my head.

I've chatted with Kiss, Chisteli, Loom & Leaf, Tuft & Needle, and one or two others I've already forgotten... and I have to save every conversation goes roughly the same way:

I either call, or initiate a "chat" via their website:
The Company Bot says hello, and earnestly offers to help me, etc.
I ask about materials, layers and foam density - the Company Bot's automated reply tells me about their unique, special-to-them MagicFoam layers that are not too soft, nor too firm, but JUST right. Except there's not actually an answer in there.
Right about now I ask again - pointing out that they haven't actually provided me any details on foam density, etc. After a lengthy delay (as the Human is actually brought on board), they again given me a nice pep talk on how awesome their mattresses are - but won't provide specific details on the mass or ILD of any specific layer.

When I do see any kind of details, it often buried in the FAQ on the website and seems to conflict with what's posted here (example: I can't find anywhere on Christeli's site that they use 5lb density base foam).

Another exampe: I literally just called Kiss and talked to a guy who was honestly a bit put-off by apparently having to talk to me (must be a millennial!). Similar to the above, he would not provide any specifics and would not elaborate on my open-ended questions about his product. Talking to this guy was like pulling teeth; so eventually I got around to asking him to compare his product to other boutique brands, such as Loom & Leaf or Christeli, or perhaps Tuft & Needle trying to get him to sell me on the strong points of why Kiss was better than any other brand, aside from their flavor of MagicFoam.

He said he's never heard of any of them.

So yeah, as far as actually contacting the companies and learning more about the products, and which one would suit my needs? It's been a huge waste of my time so far.

No one has asked me about my weight, my preferences, or any physical ailments, and honestly half of them seem to have missed the whole concept of salesmanship.
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