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Searched for: Tuft Needle
09 Aug 2018 17:03
  • Dinker65
  • Dinker65's Avatar
the eco terra was nice but i sunk in too much, t&n was too firm, novosbed was good for firmness but the feel wasn’t supportive enough, performasleep feels like tuft & needle too firm, i layed on sealy geneva ruby in a store and that felt the best but the materials are probably cheap. The novosbed and eco terra were the best for online not as good as geneva ruby, i’m mostly side sleeper and sleep on stomach and back i’m 160 lb. recommendations are appreciated aiming around $1000
18 Jul 2018 17:29
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi droidx.

Some of these polyfoams are engineered to provide feels that are somewhat similar to latex, others similar to memory foam, and others simply versions unto themselves. The foams used in this mattress are some of these high-performance polyfoams you’ve seen mentioned on the site but no "theory at a distance" can replace your own personal testing and experience with the mattress and how it feels to you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences). You can read more about the newer generation of high-performance polyfoams here.

Phoenix
07 Jun 2018 13:38
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Steve/St3v3k4hn.

If you like the feel of polyfoam, then you are correct that high-performance polyfoam (HPP) could be a good comfort layer choice to replace the worn-out memory foam in your current air bed. HPPs , depending on the formulation, offer the conformation and point elasticity found in memory foam but can be made to be more open-cell and breathable, faster in recovery, and not so temperature dependent (You probably came across this post here about the high performance” polyfoams ). If you are trying to replicate the feel of Tuft & Needle they use a top layer of higher density (about 3 lbs ) and higher performance polyfoam. The foam itself is being formulated in consultation with their foam pourer/manufacturer to meet their specific criteria and you’d need to find someone who is familiar with this particular foam to guide you. The Activus is an HR polyfoam which was specifically developed by FXI/Foamex but it's rarely seen in mattresses because it is much more expensive than other polyfoams.

As far as recommending one type of HPP over the other… they are not all equal.... some are formulated to replicate many of the viscous characteristics of memory foam, others are designed to be closer to latex in their characteristics, and then some are simply designed to be more durable versions of low-density polyfoam. You’d have to contact each manufacturer/supplier as only you can decide what you like best based on your personal testing and the balance between comfort/pressure relief and support/alignment that may be suitable for you ..... you are the only person who can feel what you feel on a mattress. More detailed discussions with the more knowledgeable people at the retailers or manufacturers that sell the HPPs that you are considering would probably be your fastest way to asses if these are what you are looking for.

You may wish to comb through and contact some of the trusted members listed here that offer custom to order mattresses and have a more detailed discussion explaining the feel you are trying to accomplish as they would be the best source of knowledge regarding the HPPs that you are considering (provided that they have that particular type)
Christeli has Energex and could send you a layer, but they recommend it only for the transition layer rather than for thicker or softer comfort layers.
You may also wish to place a phone call to Magic Sleeper as not only that they have many products and components for Mattress Repairs &componentry but they also do Sleep Number repairs and even if you do not end up purchasing from them they’d be happy to give you some tips.
SleepEZ has the float foam which is a high-performance polyfoam that is formulated to have some of the feel and contouring properties of memory foam without the low resilience, slow recovery, and temperature sensitivity of memory foam.

Hope this helps

Phoenix
06 Jun 2018 12:32
  • St3v3k4hn
  • St3v3k4hn's Avatar
Hi Phoenix
I read thru this post and also saw you describing (in other posts) high density and high performance polyfoam similar to what is used in the top layer of a Tuft and Needle mattress. You said there are several types of improved poly foams that have more point elasticity, and that are more pressure relieving and softer than standard poly foams. You even mentioned some names - Energex, Activus, Spring-tex, Avena and Futuratex.

I need to replace a 4” foam layer (some type of soft memory foam) in an air bed and would very much like to get one of the improved poly foams you mentioned above. Are there any in particular you recommend? Preferably available from a site member?

For reference, I own a Tuft and Needle bed (its in a guest room) and I really like the feel of it. I seem to prefer poly foam to memory, latex, or springs.

Thanks for your help!

Steve
25 May 2018 09:42
  • gardenguy
  • gardenguy's Avatar
Hello all,

I would appreciate someone's input on a DIY mattress I am in the process of making for my office. This will be more of a differential build and is a twin size which I used 6 inches HR foam for the base, 34 ILD-2.6 pound, from foamorder.com. The foam seems to be of excellent quality and has a much different feel than the HD foams I have tested( more rubbery feel and bouncier). It's a very supportive foam for me( 5'10", 145 pound side sleeper), too much so is the issue I have been having, even with top comfort layer . On top of this 6 inches I put 2 inches of 19 ILD blended talalay, the mattress is STILL firm but more tolerable. I am thinking I need either an additional 2 or 3 inch topper on top of this yet, to feel fully comfortable as a side sleeper. I know I don't want this mattress to have memory foam in it. As I see it my acceptable options are another 2-3 inch 19 ILD blended talalay latex, or some kind of HD-HR foam.

This is what I have found so far:
Tuft and needle has a 2.9 pound foam topper with cover in 2 inch for $120 in twin, but they can't disclose the ILD to me, just the pound rating. They can only tell me it feels a medium soft and couldn't tell me if it was HR foam or not, just that it's their proprietary foam. They do have a return policy for 100% refund but it would be a bit of a gamble as far as what it would feel like.

Foamorder.com has a 3.2 pound HR foam called Everflex V24, 24 ILD, and they claim it has durability in the 15 year range. That is 100 dollars in twin. I am not sure if 24 ILD HR foam is an acceptable ILD for a comfort layer, since HR is more supoprtive. I assume it would be less pressure relieving than HD or talalay?

Then there is latex in the 19-24 ILD range, which could work in 2 or 3 inch. I have tried 28 and 14 in the past, for comfort layers, but prefer 19 to 24. I wonder if stacking 3 inches of 19 ILD blended talalay would be too soft over the already existing 2 inch layer. But this is a very firm bed due to the HR foam base being so supportive, maybe I could get away with it.

Those are my 3 options as I see it, but I am just wondering if someone could give me their input on these 3 foams or know of another foam which I don't know about. Would 5 inches of plush over 6 inches firm support be in the realm of normal? I realize I am making up for comfort in the top layers because this HR foam is more firm than I bargained for.
23 May 2018 21:19
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi datwundude.
Congratulations on your Sleep On Latex (our Trusted Member) mattress purchase! :lol:
Thanks for sharing your experience with with them… I am glad you are enjoying your new mattress and sorry to hear about the set back with the FedEx shipment. Thanks though for your caution and recommendation connected with king size beds shippements in Post #4 here.
I hope you’ll have some time to update us after you have a chance to sleep on it for a while longer..

To moonunitann
Thanks for your update, I hope your SOL mattress in on the way…Let us know what frimness you’ve decided on. As you know Sleep On Latex is one of our Trusted Members here which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency..

To strangerousanya ......Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)
I am sorry that your Purple mattress does not work out for you, but the good news is that there are quite a few good options in your price range all with good and durable materials. Al the specs for OSO, KISS, and Sedona are listed in Post #2 here , and depending on your needs, preferences, and BMI they would all be good options to consider.

Here are a few latex or latex hybrid options that may be also worth considering, within your budget range around $1200 from our Trusted Members (I am not sure if you crossed out the innerspring option from your list but just in case you do I’ll include those as well)
SleepEZ has several options here
Arizona Premium Mattress has some options here and here and here
Luma Sleep has a Talalay/Innerspring mattress here
Flexus has a dual sided and dual firmness latex mattress here .
My Green Mattress has an all latex and a latex/pocket coil hybrid here
Sleep On Latex has two latex mattresses here .
Sedona Sleep has a two piece polyfoam/Talalay latex base mattress/topper combination here
Latex Mattress Factory has a 7" latex mattress here ..

Aside from this I would make sure to revisit the mattress shopping tutorial here (there is a condensed version of it at the end of that post) which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.
When assessing any product and before making any purchase also be sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

To seanpatrick, Napper @ Sweet Dreams
Thanks for chiming in! :) ... Silk & Snow was recently discussed and responded directly on our forum about oam spec “changes” confusion in post #14 here.

In case strangerousanya is considering this option I am listing the mattress specs as confirmed by S&S
2" of 4 lb Memory Foam
2” of 2.7 lb Responsive High-Performance Poly Foam
6” of 1.8 lb Support Polyfoam
Polyester/Spandex/Silver Infused Zipper Cover

The 2.7lb transition foam is one of the high-performance poly-foams of higher densities which was formulated to have viscoelastic properties (See post #2 here ) I would place a slight caution for the higher weight ranges due to the 4 lb of memory foam in the upper layer of the mattress.

Phoenix
20 May 2018 20:01
  • ThatMegRyanMovie
  • ThatMegRyanMovie's Avatar
I’ve referenced this site dozens of times in my search for a mattress. So helpful. Thank you.

I have a weird story that involves chronic illness (think fibromyalgia) and unusual sleeping arrangements, like a sofa from the 1800s. Before that was a decade of happiness with a pillow top — I’m a lightweight side sleeper.

A couple months ago, I sold everything I owned and moved into “affordable housing.” I figured I’d spend $300-400ish on a twin foam bed-in-a-box. I figured I was easy to please.



I bought a Spoon Sleep for $500, which they consider a 5.8 on the firmness scale, and it felt to me like an 8.5. It hurt. They sent me a topper, but it got damaged along the way, and I returned the mattress without trying it. (Fantastic company, BTW.)

I slept on my friend’s Tuft & Needle, and it felt a little softer but still far too firm for my tenderness.

I then decided I want a real softie. I went to a new Nest showroom and bought the Alexander Signature Hybrid for $715 (with tax), but a tiny mistake made the system think my order was fulfilled, and I didn’t catch it for 2 whole weeks. I requested a discount for my trouble and was offered a free set of sheets — the same offer available to everyone online — and expedited shipping. I asked for a refund.

I thought I had seen them all, then I discovered CRaVE, a new(ish) company started by Amanda Grigg, who has a 15-year background in her family’s mattress business. It’s the first woman-owned bed-in-a-box I’ve run across! Also unusual, they have Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification and use partially soy-based foam. The Ultra Plush Hybrid Innerspring Mattress is said (by others) to be softer than the Alexander, and it’s unarguably cheaper — $600 minus any discount I can find. But it’s more innerspring than foam:

1.5” convoluted latex
1.5” memory foam
8” pocketed coils
1” polyfoam

My finger’s on the trigger, but I’m waiting on the full specs and wondering if I might be better off in the long-term with a $300ish foam mattress and a topper? I’d super appreciate thoughts or opinions because indecision has led to me to sleeping on a pile of neatly folded bedding, and it *#%?&!* sucks.
12 May 2018 12:31
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi peterp.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)

I agree with you regarding “reviews” ... while other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences, in general, won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

Phoenix
11 May 2018 11:09
  • peterp
  • peterp's Avatar
Oh yah that is weird, when you said the rankings are below 4.4. I actually went there my self to check it out. His reviews are good but probably money talks ha! I compared with few other guys like this one here www.topmattress.com/tuft-and-needle-bed-review/ but still, it's hard to know who's actually doing a proper review since they all are getting paid. I guess the best option forms.
11 Apr 2018 23:39
  • Silk+Snow
  • Silk+Snow's Avatar

Hi kanati.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! ... and Congratulations on your recent mattress purchase! :)

Many reviews of this mattress have incorrectly reported the middle layer as a memory foam, which gave me concerns about it's durability given the 2.7lb density. However, knowing that this layer is actually polyfoam has allayed my fears enough to place an order.


Glad to hear that you are covering all your bases and that you contacted the company. Thanks for sharing!

The reporting was not incorrect as a while ago S&S themselves reported the second layer as being Memory Foam. To be more precise…this is what S&S themselves had listed on their own site :
2’ Ultra-Dense Supportive Memory Foam
2” Ultra-Dense Responsive Memory Foam
6” Premium Support Foam
Polyester/Spandex/Silver Infused Zipper Cover
They apparently changed their design ... new specs currently listed on their own site are:
2" of 4 lb Memory Foam
2” of 2.7 lb Responsive High Performance Foam
6” of 1.8 lb Support Polyfoam
Polyester/Spandex/Silver Infused Zipper Cover

Phoenix


I reached out to Phoenix to clarify this point and wanted to also share my response on the forum. The design of our Silk + Snow mattress has not changed, however, we did update the description of the middle layer to "high performance foam" as it better explained the type of foam being used. The middle layer is a viscoelastic foam, which is why we originally described it as a memory foam. However, for our customers who were a little more well versed in the various types of foam (and many of them appear to be TMU users), to avoid confusion, we found it more appropriate to describe this foam layer as a “high performance foam” as it is a specialty foam designed to work well as a middle layer since it offered a higher support factor and was made in higher ILDs. I believe this is also the description that is commonly used on this forum and was described very well in post #2 in the thread below:

www.themattressunderground.com/mattress-forum/index/16901-tuft-and-needle-new-top-layer-foam.html#45735
07 Apr 2018 01:46
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi ocjdl.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)

Sorry to hear your Tuft & Needle isn’t working out for you as well as you had hoped… but I am glad that you’ve had the chance to peruse the forum and start your research.

I am a back sleeper and sometimes side sleeper; though, on my current mattress, I often find that I wake up on my stomach, with my face in my pillow and a crick in my neck.


Your sleeping position change may have been dictated by an unsuitable mattress or by a natural change that occurs sometimes with aging, or both. Regardless … it I suggest you keep this under observation in your quest for a new mattress. (Which adds a bit of a layer of complication)

I struggle to tell if a mattress is actually comfortable AND supportive or not. I may feel comfortable lying on it, but when I wake up, I may be stiff, sore, or just tired. In general, my back and neck are pretty tight and sore…3. When lying in bed before I fall asleep, I don't find it to be overly comfortable — just satisfactory.


From what you describe, it seems that you may have some overlapping comfort and alignment issues. In general, issues with “pain” or discomfort earlier in the night tend to be surface comfort related, and issues with “pain” in the morning tend to be more alignment (deep support) related, makes more difficult to separate the cause between the injury and the mattress. There are some general guidelines as to what tends to cause back pain in post #2 here that you may find informative.

This could have been the result of your foam layers coming apart and a shift of materials in your mattress, or it could be the result of the foams losing some of their structure over time and not providing you with either the support or comfort that you desire. If you are sinking more than before, this could be the cause of your neck issues (pillow not providing proper alignment anymore with you sinking into the mattress too much, and the prone sleeping position does not help with this either as this is one of the major complains of prone sleepers.)

I tend to sleep hot, waking up with a puddle of sweat beneath me.


There is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here . If you decide to choose memory foam product you’d want to make sure that you don’t choose something with so much memory foam on top that you sink in too deeply. While memory foam does a very good job at minimizing motions transfer it will generally be the least breathable and most insulating of the foam comfort materials, so temperature can be an issue.

I recently stayed in a hotel and had a great night's sleep on a Simmons BeautyRest Recharge, which is an innerspring mattress (unlike my T&N). That was just one night (albeit one restful night) in a new space though…From reading this site, I'm aware that Simmons mattresses aren't the best from multiple perspectives. I


You are correct to be skeptic of your one night experience with the hotel mattress mostly because when you sleep badly, almost anything else that offers you a good night rest would look like a major improvement and also because hotel mattresses tend to have manipulated comfort as they are usually chosen with a bit firmer feeling (usually medium-firm) and then they are customized with various “top of bed” products such as polyfill toppers and plush mattress pads to add the needed extra-plushness. These are easier to replace and launder, and offer a more cost-effective solution to add a bit of plushness to a mattress. There’s more good information about hotel mattresses in post #3 here .

I find mattress shopping to be an ambiguous process. An individual's experience is so subjective that I'm not sure reviews and ratings — aside from highlighting quality issues — are very helpful. While I can focus on the construction of — and materials in — a mattress, it's difficult to compare different mattresses, even after having researched for months.


Join the club! (Sorry…you already did :))… the lack of transparency and the amount of misinformation rampant in the industry is exactly why we started this site. Larger brands and the stores that offer their products commonly rely upon the lack of information and state of confusion that they find in most consumers, and they exploit this with general marketing clichés. I am guessing that that by now you've already read through some of the material I use as a reference and learned enough to recognize a product using better quality materials or a retailer that is knowledgeable and honest so that you may trust the information you’re presented.

As for reviews or other people's experiences … I agree with you that they won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ), and generally while they can be useful to gauge the reputation of a business, I recommend to avoid considering them as any sort of a reliable indicator of the quality or appropriateness of an item for any particular person.

In the current market it's a good idea to avoid the major brands because they are often overpriced and/or use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than many of their smaller competitors although I would also avoid any mattress regardless of the name of the manufacturer where you aren't able to find out the quality and durability of the materials inside it to make sure there aren't any lower quality materials or "weak links" in the mattress (see the guidelines here ).

In sum: does anyone have any suggestions or advice for a mattress that fits with the challenges above that won't break the bank? I'd love to start sleeping well and feeling rested in the morning.


This is one of the most common questions on the forum, and there is no shortcut to identifying the type of mattress and the feel you prefer and testing it against your needs. As far as “breaking the bank” goes, you have many options both of our Trusted Members here and also non-members, provided that you do some local testing to orient yourself towards a product that meets your criteria based on your personal value equation that is most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

Anyone faced with this dilemma has a several approaches:
The first approach is to become an expert in all the different materials and methods of mattress construction that are part of every mattress. This involves knowing the differences between different materials, the variations in each different material, and how to determine the different quality levels of each material (for example the difference between "cheap" 3 lb memory foam and denser 5 lb memory foam which is more durable and performs very differently). It also involves a process which in most cases is more like pulling teeth (at least for chain stores and major brands) which is finding out the information that you need to determine quality and durability. In most cases ... mainstream outlets and brands don't even know this information and in many cases they refuse to disclose it so that comparison shopping is impossible. An hour on this site reading the overviews in the mattresses section will generally make you more of an "expert" than the vast majority of the people who sell mattresses. I highly recommend avoiding this approach and the guidelines here will help you avoid most of the more common choices that end up leading to the purchase of a poor quality and value mattresses.

The second approach is to first find the better outlets in your area that either make or sell higher quality and value mattresses and that are what I call "mattress people". these are people who already know what you otherwise would need to learn and who are committed to helping you find the most suitable mattress that fits your needs and preferences in your budget and will educate you about how to make better choices rather than "sell" you a mattress that benefits them more than it provides you wih long term satisfaction. These types of outlets are generally either factory direct outlets that make their own mattresses and sell them directly to the public or smaller local sleep shops that sell smaller independent or locally manufactured brands. This article will help you recognize these types of outlets.

I normally suggest enough research to ask better questions and that will help you know when people are giving you factual information or are just selling you marketing stories that have little to do with real quality and value. A mattress is only as good as the materials inside it and the construction methods that are used to make it.

A third option for those who don't have good quality/value outlets in their area (and surprisingly there are many areas of the country that are dominated by chain stores and have few if any outlets where I would buy a single mattress that they sell) is an online purchase. This involves doing some local testing to know the materials that you prefer and then working with a knowledgeable mattress manufacturer that is skilled at helping you make good choices over the phone based on your local testing and on the type of information (like height/weight/sleeping positions/preferences) that will affect which of the mattresses they make would be your best choice. Many of these also provide the ability to re-arrange the layers of the mattress or to make layer exchanges at a nominal cost if your choices aren't what you were hoping for. These types of outlets make the purchase of a high quality and value mattress available to those in areas of the country where there is little to no good quality and value mattresses available locally.

You've probably read through some of this material but two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are [url=]post #2 here [/url]which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and[url=] post #13 here [/url]which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While nothing has a 100% success rate ... with a local purchase for the majority of people ... careful testing using the guidelines in the tutorial rather than just testing for the more subjective "comfort" of a mattress (which often won't predict how well you will sleep on a mattress or how it will "feel" when you sleep on it at home) and some good guidance from a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer will usually result in a mattress choice that is well inside a suitable comfort/support range and will generally be "close enough" so that if any fine tuning is necessary it would be relatively minor and involve different mattress pads, sheets, mattress protectors, or perhaps even a topper if a mattress is too firm (see post #4 here and post #10 here ).

Some good local testing will also give you a much better sense of the many different types of materials and components that are used in mattresses and some reference points about the types of mattresses (see this article ) and general firmness levels you tend to prefer which can help you narrow down your choices regardless of whether you end up purchasing locally or online.

Good luck with your reserch!

Phoenix
04 Apr 2018 08:20
  • ocjdl
  • ocjdl's Avatar
Longtime reader, brand-new poster from Westchester, NY (10577). I've read the mattress shopping threads multiple times. I have been struggling with poor sleep for the past few months (but have been experiencing poor sleep off and on for much longer).

I am a back sleeper and sometimes side sleeper; though, on my current mattress, I often find that I wake up on my stomach, with my face in my pillow and a crick in my neck.

I purchased a Tuft & Needle memory foam mattress in 2015, and have primarily slept on that for the past 3 years. The primary issues I have with this mattress are that:
1. I don't wake up feeling rested.
2. I tend to sleep hot, waking up with a puddle of sweat beneath me.
3. When lying in bed before I fall asleep, I don't find it to be overly comfortable — just satisfactory.

I struggle to tell if a mattress is actually comfortable AND supportive or not. I may feel comfortable lying on it, but when I wake up, I may be stiff, sore, or just tired. In general, my back and neck are pretty tight and sore.

I recently stayed in a hotel and had a great night's sleep on a Simmons BeautyRest Recharge, which is an innerspring mattress (unlike my T&N). That was just one night (albeit one restful night) in a new space though.

From reading this site, I'm aware that Simmons mattresses aren't the best from multiple perspectives. I've been looking at similar mattresses — the Saatva seems pretty good. A friend has one, and he likes it. However, I've also read the Saatva threads here where Phoenix has concerns about the quality of some materials in the long term.

I find mattress shopping to be an ambiguous process. An individual's experience is so subjective that I'm not sure reviews and ratings — aside from highlighting quality issues — are very helpful. While I can focus on the construction of — and materials in — a mattress, it's difficult to compare different mattresses, even after having researched for months.


In sum: does anyone have any suggestions or advice for a mattress that fits with the challenges above that won't break the bank? I'd love to start sleeping well and feeling rested in the morning.

(I would have posted this as its own thread, but I see creation of new topics has been disabled in lieu of posting in the Ask An Expert section. But I don't know which expert to ask...)
28 Feb 2018 14:35
  • Mr. Side
  • Mr. Side's Avatar
Dear Phoenix,

Thanks for your reply.

I have come to similar conclusions. The latex seems the best answer if I am completely free of allergy. I have never had a reaction in hospital or doctors office. I will most likely try latex.
I was also thinking that a poly foam such as Tuft and Needle may be more tolerable than a memory foam mattress. I've never had such a severe reaction from a new sofa or from a coil spring mattress.

I was just looking at SleepEze. I suppose the extra hundred dollars for "organic" is worth it.

So far I am considering Avocado, SleepEze, and Spindle. I will probably add a few more to this list. I would love to hear experiences with these and or other brands. Thanks.

Regards, Peter
20 Feb 2018 13:46
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi whitesox20.

So far I've tried Tuft & Needle, Ghostbed, and now I'm on a Arizona Mattress Eco-Sleep. I've been on the eco-sleep for a couple of weeks now and still the same issue. The T&N and Ghostbed were medium to medium firm feels, while the Eco-Sleep is closer to medium-soft.


When you tried Ghostbed medium/firm you were mentioning that it was not supportive enough and you woke up with pains. I am not very sure if when you changed to Eco-Sleep you noticed any pain reduction, but I would use the experience you gained in this process of trial and error to fine tune the comfort/support and talk it over with Vinny or Ken at Arizona detailing the history. The 3" blended Talalay latex in the comfort layer of your mattress comes in plush (which is what you currently have) medium, firm and even extra firm. Plush is generally recommended for side sleepers where a medium is better if you sleep on both side and back and Firm is best for back and stomach sleepers.

Not sure how I would ship such a large item back and then also I would take a $200 hit returning the item.


I am not sure what the costs involved in returning the item would be but at this point you still have options of fine-tuning this system and make it work for you but if it comes to having to return the product you can reduce the size of the unit to the original shipment for reducing the cost and it should not be too difficult to reduce the size of the spring unit for shipping if you place the innerspring into the saved plastic packaging material the unit came with, then seal with tape all places where air can enter except a small area just big enough for a vacuum cleaner nozzle. Suck the air out until unit is compressed, roll it, slip a plastic sleeve over the rolled cylinder (you can call Arizona Premium support to ask for a replacement plastic sleeve) You watch this video here of how to return the pocket coil: www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmAOgItthDQ
How to Return or Ship a Latex Foam or Memory Foam Mattress www.youtube.com/watch?v=nD73IOG0oiM&t=9s

I currently sleep on my side and try to stay in the "ergonomic" side position as much as possible. I've been waking up in the middle of the night a lot lately with a sore lower back, not sure if that is why I am waking up or not. I weigh about 150-160 pounds


While “proper” alignment is one of the keys to achieving more time in the deeper stages of sleep, it is rare to find someone that has an exactly “straight” spine (when on their side), nor is a perfectly straight spine necessary to achieve good comfort. We all have our individual abnormalities, so the key is finding what works best for us as individuals. Additionally, unless you were experiencing something quite a bit outside of your “normal” alignment, it would be difficult for you to discern personally if your spine was “straight” or not. And even with very accurate measuring techniques like white-light raster triangulation, research shows that many people achieve their own personal “neutral” alignment with hip tilt and some thoracic curvature.

In general, you’d want firm enough deep support, which the eco would provide for your BMI, and then comfort layers that are "just enough" in terms of thickness and softness to "fill in" and support the more recessed parts of your side sleeping profile and relieve pressure. I would also make sure to check the foundation is supporting the mattress well when you are lying on your mattress

I am not very sure if you are experiencing upper, mid, or lower back issues, as this would also give you a clue of the “culprit”, but it may be worth trying a relatively thin pillow in between your knees to see if it makes any difference. Also, a pillow or body pillow placed in front and/or behind you can assist with "locking" you into the side position. Also, be sure to adjust the thickness of your pillow under your head when sleeping on your side, all this would allow you collect enough data points to pinpoint what is going on. So it is all very individualized and I would make sure to include your findings in your conversation with Arizona.

Based on the basic information you provided, that's about as specific as I can be with my guidance. I hope that information is helpful.

Phoenix
20 Feb 2018 04:59
  • whitesox20
  • whitesox20's Avatar
Hello,
I am in need of some advice. I've tried a few different mattresses to help my lower back pain but can't seem to find the "one". My back is most sore after waking up in the morning, which I've thought it has to be the mattress I'm sleeping on. So far I've tried Tuft & Needle, Ghostbed, and now I'm on a Arizona Mattress Eco-Sleep. I've been on the eco-sleep for a couple of weeks now and still the same issue. The T&N and Ghostbed were medium to medium firm feels, while the Eco-Sleep is closer to medium-soft. I'm not sure what to do at this point because I can't really return the Eco-Sleep. Not sure how I would ship such a large item back and then also I would take a $200 hit returning the item. I'm just lost at this point and not sure what direction to head... I currently sleep on my side and try to stay in the "ergonomic" side position as much as possible. I've been waking up in the middle of the night a lot lately with a sore lower back, not sure if that is why I am waking up or not. I weigh about 150-160 pounds
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