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Searched for: Restonic
27 Mar 2016 13:55
  • HariS
  • HariS's Avatar
Hey Phoenix,

Thanks for all the information on buying a mattress. I have emailed both companies and thoroughly researched what I could on those two mattresses trying to find out what materials they use. Restonic still hasn't emailed me back, and while I couldn't find anything on that specific mattress (Apparently, Restonic makes specific mattresses for every site, including Sleep Doctor). Here is what i found on the Restonic ComfortCare Signature series which seems to be made the same as the one i tried as described by the store salesman and the info card on the mattress:

15" overall thickness of mattress
4" of Tempagel Memory Foam (Made with gel infused memory foam and Outlast® Technology)
The remaining 11" of individually wrapped, foam encased coils (858 coils)
There is also a foam encased border

Unfortunately at this point, I don't have too much more information to provide with that mattress. I have emailed them and am hoping the get more information, and I will post as necessary.

As for the Capitol Bedding Pure Essence Plush here are the specs I was able to find:

3" of gel memory foam (Made by FutureFoam and has a density of 4lb/ft^3)
2" of transition foam (density of 1.8 lbs/ft^3
6" of 1.8 lbs/ft^3 foam (20lb compression)
It also has 3" of foam side rails for support
All that is covered by a bamboo elas cover


Hopefully this can help you provide some comparison between the two mattresses. I will update you as I get more information. I am able to get both mattresses for $1000, and that is my max budget when purchasing a mattress.


A few other questions I have, is there any difference between buying the mattress protector in store vs on amazon? The salesman at sleep doctor said the mattress protector is $99 and looking on Amazon, I can get ones for much cheaper and they all say 10 year warranty. So while I think $99 is a lot for a mattress protector, I'm not sure if it offers and more advantage than a $30 one on amazon.


Finally, since I am a very indecisive person :), I have read a lot about Helix Sleep and Brooklyn Beddings best mattress ever on this website and others, and I am not sure how they compare in terms of quality/value to the ones I have listed above. But I am always wary of buying a mattress online, since I cant sleep on it until it arrives, but those two mattresses specifically seem to be highly rated and are cheaper than the two I have found in stores. Not sure how much you can comment on those, but figured it was worth a shot :)


Thank you so much for the information and helping make this process a lot easier
24 Mar 2016 16:01
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi HariS,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! ... and I'm glad you found us.

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place I would start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

While nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) which is the most important part of "value", the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new) so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

I liked laying on all three mattresses, and I am curious as to the quality of the materials in both the Capitol bedding mattresses and the Restonic? When comparing the quality of materials in the two hybrid mattresses (Restonic and Emerald), is one made out of better materials than the other? I just don't want either of these mattresses sagging or having any issues in the first few years.


If you can find out the information in this article for each of the mattress you are looking at and post them on the forum I'd be happy to make some comments about the quality and durability of each of the materials in the mattresses you are looking at and let you know if there are any lower quality materials or weak links that would be a cause for concern. Without this information it's not possible to make any meaningful comments about the quality or durability of a mattress.

Also, I was told that all memory foam mattresses last longer than hybrid mattresses so that is why I am considering an all foam mattress. I'm not sure if anyone could comment on the validity of that statement.


This certainly isn't the case at all and which specific mattress was more durable would depend on the quality and durability of the materials and components in each mattress you were comparing ... not the type or category of mattress. A memory foam mattress that used high quality materials would be more durable than a hybrid mattress that used low quality materials and the opposite would also be just as true.

A mattress will tend to soften and break down from the top layers down and the weakest link in a mattress in terms of durability will generally be in the upper layers and components that are closer to the sleeping surface ... not the innerspring or foam base layer underneath them.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ).

Phoenix
24 Mar 2016 15:28
  • HariS
  • HariS's Avatar
Hi,

I have been to almost every mattress store around my area and have narrowed down my search to 3 mattresses:

Pure Essence Plush from Capitol Bedding
capitolbedding.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Pure-Essence-Plush.pdf

Emerald Pillow Plush from Capitol Bedding
capitolbedding.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Emerald-Pillow-Plush.pdf

Restonic Siesta Eurotop mattress
restonic.com/mattresses/comfortcare-signature

ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint 1: capitolbedding.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Pure-Essence-Plush.pdf| Archived Footprint 2: capitolbedding.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Emerald-Pillow-Plush.pdf |Archived Footprint 3: restonic.com/mattresses/comfortcare-signature

The link for the Restonic isn't the exact mattress, but it was the only mattress on the website I could find that matches the construction of the bed i tried in store. The Restonic Siesta is made with individually wrapped coils, more coils in the middle third than the ends, and a 4" layer or Tempagel on top of the coils.

I liked laying on all three mattresses, and I am curious as to the quality of the materials in both the Capitol bedding mattresses and the Restonic? When comparing the quality of materials in the two hybrid mattresses (Restonic and Emerald), is one made out of better materials than the other? I just don't want either of these mattresses sagging or having any issues in the first few years.

Also, I was told that all memory foam mattresses last longer than hybrid mattresses so that is why I am considering an all foam mattress. I'm not sure if anyone could comment on the validity of that statement.

Any advice on the quality of materials in these mattresses and/or the quality of the companies making these mattresses would be greatly appreciated! :)
29 Feb 2016 11:46
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi kewlwhip,

Sleep Shops in Hattiesburg, MS area


The only options I'm aware of in your immediate area that I would consider (subject to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ) are included in the Jackson, MS list here . (Angeles Furniture and Mattress which carries Pure Latex Bliss and Furniture South which carries Jamison and some Restonic mattresses).

If you are comfortable with a longer drive then some of the options in the Baton Rouge list here may be worthwhile calling and/or visiting since there are several factory direct manufacturers in the area that would be well worth considering.

Phoenix
28 Feb 2016 20:46
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi DavidL,

After researching mattresses for several weeks, I finally decided to go with the Sleep EZ 13000. After initial research, I determined I wanted to try a latex bed. I went to a local mattress shop here in NE Ohio to see if they had any. They did not, but I tried a Tempurapedic with gel phone and thought it may work since it didn't seem to get hot after about 15 minutes. I then visited the Original Mattress factory and tried out their latex bed. I hated it. Really bouncy with no edge support. So I was done with the latex mattress, so I thought. The following week my son's high school had a fund raiser selling mattresses. There I tried out Restonic's latex bed and like it. Completely different from the Original Mattress factory. So after some more research, even considering some hybrids, I settled on Dreamfoam's All latex mattress. It seemed to have everything I was looking for.


Every category of mattresses including latex or latex hybrid mattresses can include hundreds or even thousands of different mattresses with different designs, different "feels", different characteristics, and different firmness levels. Any differences in every layer and component in a mattress (such as the type of latex in the layer, the firmness of the layer, or the thickness of the layer) including the cover and any quilting material will affect the feel and response of every other layer both above and below it so each category will generally include some mattresses that you may sleep well on or that matches your specific needs and preferences and other mattresses that use the same type of materials and are in the same category that may be unsuitable for you to sleep on even if the actual materials are the same. While testing local mattresses can give you a sense of how you feel about different materials or different types of mattresses in very general terms ... the only way to know whether you like a specific mattress or whether it will be a good "match" for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) will be based on your own careful testing or your personal experience.

I was about to order it, but wanted to double-check with my wife. Our current hybrid mattress is about 13-14", but the Dreamfoam latex is only 10" high as are many of the latex mattresses. While it seemed that the 10" mattress may not have too much of a gap with the headboard on our bed, my wife pointed out that the already high nightstands would be essentially 3" higher. So, now I needed to find a 13 or 14" mattress.


Latex is one of the most costly mattress materials so adding an additional layer of latex just for the sake of adding some additional height would be more costly than necessary. I don't know your weight and for most people 12" of latex wouldn't be necessary but it could still be a preference that some people may prefer so that may also be worth taking into consideration. There is more about the effect of additional thickness in post #14 here .

You could also use a foundation under your mattress (either a regular height that was about 8" - 9" tall or a low profile foundation that is generally about 4" to 5" tall) to add some additional height but this would also be more costly if you have a platform bedframe that is already suitable for supporting a latex mattress (with slats that are no more than 3" apart). If you are looking for a lower cost solution you could add some ultra firm polyfoam (as firm as possible so it will have the least possible effect on your mattress) in any thickness you wish under the mattress that would be a much less costly way to provide the additional height you are looking for.

I debated with myself between the Dreamfoam Aloe Alexis at 14" and the Sleep EZ 13000. Looks like I'll need to pay about a $700 premium to get the latex core of the 13000 instead of the polyfoam core in the Aloe Alexis. Is the latex core worth the premium? Can I expect a better experience or longer life with the latex core? Also, should the Sleep EZ core be the blended Talalay or the 100% Dunlop? I thought I've read where the blended latex, though not all natural, should last longer. Any thoughts to help me finalize a decision would be great. I'm tired of the research and looking forward to some better sleep. Thanks.


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... I don't make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

There is more about the 3 most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While I can't speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value") the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new) so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

All of the mattresses you are considering use high quality materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links in their design that would compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress or that would be a reason for concern with any of them.

When you sleep on a mattress the upper layers of foam will compress and deflect more than the deeper layers partly because the comfort layers are usually made to be softer than the deeper transition and support layers of a mattress (and firmness/softness is also a factor in the durability of a material) and partly because they are closer to the sleeping surface and subject to direct compression without any layers above them absorbing some of the compression forces first. It's this constant deflection of the foam materials in the upper layers of the mattress that softens and breaks down the foam and leads to the loss of comfort and support in the mattress. This will also happen more under the heavier parts of the body such as the hips/pelvis than the lighter parts of the body. This is why the quality/durability of the upper layers (the top 3" to 6" of the mattress) are especially important in the durability and useful life of the mattress as a whole because they will usually be the weakest link in the mattress in terms of durability.

Since the top 6" of both the Alexis and the SleepEZ would be latex they would be closely comparable in terms of durability but of course all of the mattresses you mentioned would feel and perform differently from each other because they all have a different design (although if the top 6" of latex were the same in both of them then the differences would be less noticeable to many people although they both have different covers and quilting which would also affect how they feel relative to each other).

There is more information about how the SleepEZ 10000 would compare to the Alexis in this topic that may be helpful and the comparison with the 13000 would be similar except of course it is thicker, contains once more layer than the 10000 (which is more costly), and has more options available with 4 layers to rearrange the layers to fine tune the comfort and support of the mattress.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

Once you have narrowed down your options to a list of finalists that are all choices between "good and good" and none of them have any lower quality materials or "weak links" in their design relative to your weight range (which they don't) and if there are no clear winners between them (which is usually a good indication that you have done some good research) then you are in the fortunate position that any of them would likely be a suitable choice and post #2 here can help you make a final choice based on your local testing or mattresses you have slept well on, your more detailed conversations about each of them, your confidence about PPP and the suitability of each one, their prices, your preferences for different types of materials and components, the options you have after a purchase to fine tune the mattress or exchange or return the mattress or individual layers and any costs involved, any additional extras that are part of each purchase, and on "informed best judgement" based on all the other objective, subjective, and intangible parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
28 Feb 2016 18:53
  • DavidL
  • DavidL's Avatar
After researching mattresses for several weeks, I finally decided to go with the Sleep EZ 13000. After initial research, I determined I wanted to try a latex bed. I went to a local mattress shop here in NE Ohio to see if they had any. They did not, but I tried a Tempurapedic with gel phone and thought it may work since it didn't seem to get hot after about 15 minutes. I then visited the Original Mattress factory and tried out their latex bed. I hated it. Really bouncy with no edge support. So I was done with the latex mattress, so I thought. The following week my son's high school had a fund raiser selling mattresses. There I tried out Restonic's latex bed and like it. Completely different from the Original Mattress factory. So after some more research, even considering some hybrids, I settled on Dreamfoam's All latex mattress. It seemed to have everything I was looking for. I was about to order it, but wanted to double-check with my wife. Our current hybrid mattress is about 13-14", but the Dreamfoam latex is only 10" high as are many of the latex mattresses. While it seemed that the 10" mattress may not have too much of a gap with the headboard on our bed, my wife pointed out that the already high nightstands would be essentially 3" higher. So, now I needed to find a 13 or 14" mattress. I debated with myself between the Dreamfoam Aloe Alexis at 14" and the Sleep EZ 13000. Looks like I'll need to pay about a $700 premium to get the latex core of the 13000 instead of the polyfoam core in the Aloe Alexis. Is the latex core worth the premium? Can I expect a better experience or longer life with the latex core? Also, should the Sleep EZ core be the blended Talalay or the 100% Dunlop? I thought I've read where the blended latex, though not all natural, should last longer. Any thoughts to help me finalize a decision would be great. I'm tired of the research and looking forward to some better sleep. Thanks.
10 Feb 2016 21:52
  • Slumber_lover
  • Slumber_lover's Avatar
Thanks Phoenix--I'm just petrified of making another mistake. My body likes the Overton (no pain) but my head and experience makes me wary of a too soft bed. You're right, the 1st bed (the 45th street 28 Dunlop ILD was finally ok on the last night in my house before the truck came to exchange it for the much too soft Restonic. And you're also right about the 90 days with Parklane--I'll pay a fee for the exchange (truck pick up/recycle, workers time, work,etc.)
It's a hard decision based on the ILD's (feel like I want one in between the woodstock and overton) but whatever....I just have to take the plunge, again....MANY thanks again. I'll keep ya' posted.
10 Feb 2016 21:27
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Slumber_lover,

I switched your post to your previous topic so it would be easier to go back and read some of your previous history.

You helped me in 2013 when buying a latex mattress in Portland, OR. I did the textbook thing: bought a latex mattress that was too hard (a lovely 45th street bed-the Woodlawn Plush- purchased from the Mattress Lot in Portland) and exchanged it (after paying $200 for the exchange) for a way-too-soft latex bed from Restonics called 'Orchid'. Now, I'm having back pain so bad that I need to buy another mattress....oops.


I'm sorry to hear that your Restonic didn't work out as well as you hoped for. It sounds like you went from a mattress that was a little too firm (although it seems that it was starting to feel better for you after a few weeks of sleeping on it just before you exchanged it) and then "jumped over" the comfort/support range that may have been the best match for you and ended up with a mattress that was either too soft originally or was so close to the edge of being too soft that only a small amount of foam softening was enough to take you over the edge.

So, I just wanted your 2cents again, this time I'm going to Parklane. I'm stuck between the Woodstock (their 'medium' latex mattress and their Overton-their 'soft' latex mattress. They say that their talalay latex Woodstock is a core of 32 ILD with 1 inch of 20 ILD over an inch of 32 ILD. The softer Overton is also a core of 32 but with 2 inches of 20 ILD. I like them both Phoenix--the Woodstock feels more supportive on my ruptured disc but the Overton feels better on my left shoulder where I have nerve entrapment. My current way-too-soft latex mattress is great for my shoulder but the craps for my back. I'm leaning to purchasing the Woodstock because once again, I can make it softer but can't make a too soft bed firmer.


As you know from your previous time here it's very difficult to "fix" a mattress that is too soft without removing and replacing either comfort layers that are too thick/soft or a support core that is too soft ... there are some suggestions in post #4 here that may be helpful and could be worth considering before you replace your mattress.

There is also more information about most common symptoms that people may experience when they sleep on a mattress and the most likely (although not the only) reasons for them in post #2 here .

While this may not be all that helpful for your current circumstances ... it's very possible that all you really needed with your previous "too firm" was a topper that would have given you some of the additional softness and pressure relief that you needed. Some of the information in posts #2 and #3 here may have also been helpful at the time or may be helpful if you experience similar issues on another mattress.

As you know I can't make any specific suggestions because I can't feel what you feel on a mattress and your own careful testing and personal experience will be a much more reliable guideline about which of the two are a better match for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) than any "theory at a distance" that I can provide. I would also make sure that you take lots of time testing both mattresses so that your body is completely relaxed and you can spend "enough" time on each mattress to "listen" to the messages and pay attention to any subtle cues that it tells you.

In most cases if you are testing two mattresses that are different firmness levels and both of them seem to work equally well and you really can't tell which of them would be the best "match" for you then I would normally suggest going with the slightly firmer one because it would usually be less risky but in this case Parklane has a 90 day exchange policy and it seems that even the softer version may have slightly firmer layers than the Restonic you have now (although I don't know this for sure because I don't know the specifics of all the layers in your Restonic) so unless your careful and extended testing clearly indicates otherwise, because of your shoulder issues I would be tempted to go with the softer option because you can always exchange it for the firmer one and even then if the one you exchange it for is too firm you would still have the option of adding a softer topper.

Phoenix
10 Feb 2016 17:51
  • Slumber_lover
  • Slumber_lover's Avatar
:woohoo:
Hi Phoenix,
You helped me in 2013 when buying a latex mattress in Portland, OR. I did the textbook thing: bought a latex mattress that was too hard (a lovely 45th street bed-the Woodlawn Plush- purchased from the Mattress Lot in Portland) and exchanged it (after paying $200 for the exchange) for a way-too-soft latex bed from Restonics called 'Orchid'. Now, I'm having back pain so bad that I need to buy another mattress....oops.
So, I just wanted your 2cents again, this time I'm going to Parklane. I'm stuck between the Woodstock (their 'medium' latex mattress and their Overton-their 'soft' latex mattress. They say that their talalay latex Woodstock is a core of 32 ILD with 1 inch of 20 ILD over an inch of 32 ILD. The softer Overton is also a core of 32 but with 2 inches of 20 ILD. I like them both Phoenix--the Woodstock feels more supportive on my ruptured disc but the Overton feels better on my left shoulder where I have nerve entrapment. My current way-too-soft latex mattress is great for my shoulder but the craps for my back. I'm leaning to purchasing the Woodstock because once again, I can make it softer but can't make a too soft bed firmer.
I've also decided to buy their adjustable bed frame because that thing just rocks. I forgot the name of the manufacturer of the frame it but hopefully it's solid.
Any help you could offer would help me! I can't believe I'm having to purchase yet another mattress...I'm in the doghouse for this too...tears.
01 Feb 2016 15:07
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Saphireblue,

Today we went and tried the Savvy Rest mattress at their store in Vienna. Upon entering the store, my nose started to burn. After leaving the store I noticed my throat was tight and burning. I do have an allergy to latex gloves (rash and itchy hands) I've worked in a lab for yrs. and had to switch to nitrile gloves. It never occurred to me that I might have the same allergy to a latex mattress, but I think that is what was happening. I did not notice this with the Dunlopillo Mattress from Sherwood Bedding. Maybe because Urban Mattress is a much larger store and not full of only latex mattresses. It really doesn't matter, I am afraid to get anything with latex now.


There is more about the different types of latex allergies in post #2 here . It's possible that you were reacting to some latex particles in the air because most Savvy Rest stores would be rearranging bare latex layers for their customers on a regular basis. While a true type I allergy to latex would be very rare compared to a type IV or contact allergy (which are more common but don't generally affect choosing a latex mattress because there is no contact with the latex) ... it's certainly possible (and much more serious) and if you suspect that you may have a type I latex allergy then it would be a good idea to see a health professional and get tested just in case you need to carry an epipen because of the prevalence of latex in our society.

If you are reacting to contact with dust particles and have a type IV or contact allergy or sensitivity then it's possible that some types of latex may affect you and others may not because different manufacturers can use different curing packages to manufacture their latex. It may also good idea to ask for a sample and carry it around with you for a day to see if you are sensitive to the latex in a specific mattress you are considering.

Do you happen to know if the R&B Encased Coil with Memory Foam at the Room and Board store is latex free?


You can see the layers and components of their encased coil mattress with memory foam here (click the "construction" tab) and there is no latex listed in the materials and components.

Do you happen to know if the R&B Encased Coil with Memory Foam at the Room and Board store is latex free? Is Memory Foam latex? I think we will stick to the encased coil for our support layer from now on. If you have any other recommendations of stores in Northern Va. which might have coil mattresses without latex I would appreciate suggestions. Maybe the Restonic mattress at. Mt. Airy Mattress, is it worth the 2 hour drive? Is their Tempa Gel latex free and a good support system? I can call them tomorrow about the latex part. Just wanted to know if you knew about it's quantities. I also called Mattress Traditions in Falls Church, Va, and left a message for an appointment. They have not called back yet.


I don't keep a record of the individual mattresses or their specs that the retailers and manufacturers in the hundreds of forum lists throughout the forum carry on their floor or have available online (it would be a bigger job than anyone could keep up with in a constantly changing market) but checking their websites and making some preliminary phone calls to the retailers/manufacturers that are on the local lists is always a good idea before you decide on which retailers or manufacturers you wish to deal with anyway. This will tell you which of them carry mattresses that would meet your specific criteria, are transparent about the materials in their mattresses, and that carry the type of mattresses that you are interested in that are also in the budget range you are comfortable with. Once you have checked their websites and/or talked with the ones that interest you then you will be in a much better position to decide on the ones that you are most interested in considering or visiting based on the results of your preliminary research and conversations.

The last time I talked with them Mt Airy didn't carry any of the Restonic latex mattresses but this may have changed since and they don't list the specifics of the models they carry on their website so I don't know if any of their mattresses contain any latex.

The only way to know whether any mattress has a good support system that would be a suitable choice for you in terms of PPP (regardless of whether it would be suitable for anyone else) will be based on your own careful testing and personal experience.

Phoenix
01 Feb 2016 14:08
  • Saphireblue
  • Saphireblue's Avatar
Today we went and tried the Savvy Rest mattress at their store in Vienna. Upon entering the store, my nose started to burn. After leaving the store I noticed my throat was tight and burning. I do have an allergy to latex gloves (rash and itchy hands) I've worked in a lab for yrs. and had to switch to nitrile gloves. It never occurred to me that I might have the same allergy to a latex mattress, but I think that is what was happening. I did not notice this with the Dunlopillo Mattress from Sherwood Bedding. Maybe because Urban Mattress is a much larger store and not full of only latex mattresses. It really doesn't matter, I am afraid to get anything with latex now.
Do you happen to know if the R&B Encased Coil with Memory Foam at the Room and Board store is latex free? Is Memory Foam latex? I think we will stick to the encased coil for our support layer from now on. If you have any other recommendations of stores in Northern Va. which might have coil mattresses without latex I would appreciate suggestions. Maybe the Restonic mattress at. Mt. Airy Mattress, is it worth the 2 hour drive? Is their Tempa Gel latex free and a good support system? I can call them tomorrow about the latex part. Just wanted to know if you knew about it's quantities. I also called Mattress Traditions in Falls Church, Va, and left a message for an appointment. They have not called back yet.
26 Jan 2016 14:37
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Slumpy,

This included driving around and laying on all the one sided beds in our area (I did call around and no one has a double sided in the state of CO)


I'm not sure where you live in Colorado but if you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area ... and some of them may have some two sided mattresses (I believe Verlo for example still makes some two sided mattresses). There is also more about the pros and cons of one sided and two sided mattresses in post #3 here but I wouldn't necessarily assume that a two sided mattress is "better" than a one sided mattress because it would depend on the specifics of the materials and components in the two mattresses you are comparing.

A year and a half ago, we bought a brand-y new, no flip, great for your back and green for the environment memory foam mattress in firm. Yay, until 6 months went by, and it is horrible. :angry: We are in worse pain now than before. We have decided to go back to innerspring, as we both need the support. We have been careful to try a lot of mattresses at our local suppliers. (all one sided) Invariably we always like the ones on the firm side, but not hard, with a bit of pressure relief. We both have and need lumbar support. Hip pain is an issue. Anything listed as “plush, pillow top, feather soft” was too soft for us. But, I want a double sided; seriously not sold on this one sided it doesn’t last and you can’t ever flip “new” mattress.


I'm assuming that you've read the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps most importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

I would also keep in mind that as long as the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses (see this article ) are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice.

While I can't speak to how any mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances ... outside of PPP the most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new) so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines I linked to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

FLEXUS COMFORT POSTURE SENSE MATTRESS: 10” BODY PRINT TRI ZONE POCKET COILS, 15 gauge, 810 count 1.5 LB CERTIPURE EDGE, SAME CUSIONING 2” FOAM, 1” BAMBOO QUILT, CENTER 3RD LUMBAR SUPPORT $675.00 – Pro- looks like good quality. Con- no return policy, shipping around 225.00.


As you probably know ... Flexus is one of the members of this site which means I think highly of them and I believe they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency and would certainly be well worth considering. The materials and components in this mattress meet the quality/durability guidelines I would suggest and are no lower quality materials or weak links in this mattress that would compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress.

CORSICANA SLEEP INC 270 TRADITIONS FIRM : 12” MATTRESS 3/4 “ FOAM, FIBER PAD, 2” EXTRA FIRM FOAM, OFFSET COILS 14.5 GAUGE KING 1015 COUNT $776.00 FREE DLIVERY, 100 DAY TRIAL. Listed as “hard” Pro- free delivery and 100 day trial allowed. Con- not sure if this is a decent quality mattress, is “hard” so I may need to play the topper game.


If you can find out the information here and post it on the forum I'd be happy to let you know if I can see any lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress that would be a cause for concern but without this information it isn't possible to make any meaningful comments about a mattress. Corsicana tends to use lower quality/density materials in their mattresses and you may have some difficulty finding out all the information you would need about the materials and components inside their mattresses that you would need to make an informed choice (see this article ) and I would avoid any mattress that uses lower quality/density materials or where you can't find out the quality/density of the materials and components inside it.

Serta Perfect Sleeper Hotel Bronze Suite Supreme Double Sided Plush King Size Mattress- $776.00 Quilt - Top of Mattress Temperature Control Pillo-Fill Fiber FireBlocker 1/2" Serta PillowSoft Foam Comfort - Padding Layers 1" Serta PillowSoft Foam Serta Insulator Pad Coil System: High Profile Continuous Support System Coil Gauge: 13.25 Count King 664 Foam Encased Edge Support - Pro- states that it is listed as plush but is actually more firm Cons- not sure if the materials are quality, is a Big-S company


Again ... most of the most of the major brands (such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta) tend to use lower quality materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay and I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (and the major retailers that focus on them) along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

Restonic Comfort Care Andover Firm Double Sided King Size Mattress - $549 Quilt - Top of Mattress 2" Quilted Cover with Marvelous Middle Features Outlast Technology Comfort - Padding Layers 1" High Density Firm Foam 1/2" Memory Foam SystemHeavy Duty Insulator Pad Bonnell Innerspring System Border Rod Gauge: 6 Coil Gauge: 12.75 KING 520Metal Edge Support – Pro, its cheap Con- it’s cheap


You may have a little more success in finding out the quality/density of the materials in a Restonic mattress (and again if you can post the specifics on the forum I'd be happy to make some comments) but this will depend on the ability and/or willingness of the retailer you are working with to find out all the information you would need from the factory. Many if not most retailers have little idea about the quality or durability of the materials in their mattresses and as sad as it is most of the members here that have spent a few hours on the forum will know more about mattress materials and components than most of the salespeople that sell them in the mainstream industry.

Wolf Gemini Flippable King-size Innerspring Mattress/ 336 high profile mattress - $609.99; Mattress Top: Plush Top, Quilted, Tight, Density: 1.5 Pound, Product Features: Double-sided, Thickness: 10 Inch, Mattress Type: Foam, Innerspring, Support: Plush Firm
Pro- other sites have them as a good company with good quality beds, shipping is free, price is nice. Con- I couldn’t get any more information on exactly what this beds specs are, such as type of coil and gauge.


Again I would need more specific information to make any meaningful comments about this mattress.

The Corsicana uses an offset coil and the Serta uses a continuous coil and both the Restonic and the Wolf use a Bonnell coil which are all "linked coils" so I would make sure you are comfortable with the potential for motion transfer if that's important to you.

There is more information about the different types of innersprings in this article and in post #10 here .

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and any firmness level options they have to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

In its simplest form ... choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to first finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in (either locally or online) and that you have confirmed can provide you with all the information you need to know to make an informed choice and make meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
26 Jan 2016 11:42
  • Slumpy
  • Slumpy's Avatar
Hi, I am new to the forum, and wanted to reach out for a bit of guidance on some specific mattresses and their overall quality.
I have read everything I can on this site for a few weeks now, and based the following specific choices on what I have read, my price point, and what my husband and I feel meets our specific comfort level. This included driving around and laying on all the one sided beds in our area (I did call around and no one has a double sided in the state of CO)
A tad bit of background: I had a fabulous 2 sided bed firm springs with plush top for around 10 years. In the last couple years, the plush top got lumpy, and both my husband and I had backaches, so we decided to get a new mattress. A year and a half ago, we bought a brand-y new, no flip, great for your back and green for the environment memory foam mattress in firm. Yay, until 6 months went by, and it is horrible. :angry: We are in worse pain now than before. We have decided to go back to innerspring, as we both need the support. We have been careful to try a lot of mattresses at our local suppliers. (all one sided) Invariably we always like the ones on the firm side, but not hard, with a bit of pressure relief. We both have and need lumbar support. Hip pain is an issue. Anything listed as “plush, pillow top, feather soft” was too soft for us. But, I want a double sided; seriously not sold on this one sided it doesn’t last and you can’t ever flip “new” mattress. So begins the online shopping.
Here are the ones I came up with.
FLEXUS COMFORT POSTURE SENSE MATTRESS: 10” BODY PRINT TRI ZONE POCKET COILS, 15 gauge, 810 count 1.5 LB CERTIPURE EDGE, SAME CUSIONING 2” FOAM, 1” BAMBOO QUILT, CENTER 3RD LUMBAR SUPPORT $675.00 – Pro- looks like good quality. Con- no return policy, shipping around 225.00.

CORSICANA SLEEP INC 270 TRADITIONS FIRM : 12” MATTRESS 3/4 “ FOAM, FIBER PAD, 2” EXTRA FIRM FOAM, OFFSET COILS 14.5 GAUGE KING 1015 COUNT $776.00 FREE DLIVERY, 100 DAY TRIAL. Listed as “hard” Pro- free delivery and 100 day trial allowed. Con- not sure if this is a decent quality mattress, is “hard” so I may need to play the topper game.

Alternates:
Serta Perfect Sleeper Hotel Bronze Suite Supreme Double Sided Plush King Size Mattress- $776.00 Quilt - Top of Mattress Temperature Control Pillo-Fill Fiber FireBlocker 1/2" Serta PillowSoft Foam Comfort - Padding Layers 1" Serta PillowSoft Foam Serta Insulator Pad Coil System: High Profile Continuous Support System Coil Gauge: 13.25 Count King 664 Foam Encased Edge Support - Pro- states that it is listed as plush but is actually more firm Cons- not sure if the materials are quality, is a Big-S company

Restonic Comfort Care Andover Firm Double Sided King Size Mattress - $549 Quilt - Top of Mattress 2" Quilted Cover with Marvelous Middle Features Outlast Technology Comfort - Padding Layers 1" High Density Firm Foam 1/2" Memory Foam SystemHeavy Duty Insulator Pad Bonnell Innerspring System Border Rod Gauge: 6 Coil Gauge: 12.75 KING 520Metal Edge Support – Pro, its cheap Con- it’s cheap

Wolf Gemini Flippable King-size Innerspring Mattress/ 336 high profile mattress - $609.99; Mattress Top: Plush Top, Quilted, Tight, Density: 1.5 Pound, Product Features: Double-sided, Thickness: 10 Inch, Mattress Type: Foam, Innerspring, Support: Plush Firm
Pro- other sites have them as a good company with good quality beds, shipping is free, price is nice. Con- I couldn’t get any more information on exactly what this beds specs are, such as type of coil and gauge.

I know this is a really long message, I am so sorry. I know no one can pick for me, that’s not what I am after. Just a comparison on the quality of each is all I am really looking at, as some have no return policies, and I want to make the most educated decision possible.
Thank you!
30 Dec 2015 08:28
  • shaxpere
  • shaxpere's Avatar
Hi, I'm very much a newbie at mattress buying, and now am in a predicament of my own making. I'm hoping that I can get some sage advice from this forum. Please excuse my blatant ignorance and obvious mistakes.

This fall my wife and I decided to finally replace our 10 year old Restonic innerspring mattress that was sagging in the middle. After almost no research, other than to determine that organic latex seemed like a good idea, we ordered a medium-firm Harmony from Astrabeds. Construction is three 3" layers of Dunlop latex, with densities of (bottom to top) 90, 80, 70, topped with a wool comfort layer.

Mattress delivered and installed, we started using it and I started getting lower back pain that I could not relieve by changing position. Not every night, but more often than not. I'm mostly a side sleeper, and on the old mattress if I would ever start to feel pain, I would just rollover, which would realign things. Thinking I needed the new mattress to be firmer, I reversed the order of the layers. Not only did this not help me, but my wife hated the change. We finally gave up and returned the mattress.

Thinking that I still needed firm, but with better conformity/comfort, I discovered Essentia, which makes a slow-release latex akin to memory foam. This time I visited their store in New York City while on a work trip. After talking with the rep and trying the different mattresses, I got a queen Classic 8, which has 6" of Dunlop latex (no idea of density) topped with 2" of 5.25 lb latex "memory foam".

Mattress delivered and installed, first night was awful. Neither of us could get comfortable. Second night (last night) we added an old 2" foam egg crate layer we had on the guest bed. It was marginally more comfortable, but I still had back pain.

To add to my confusion, during the interim between the Astrabed and the Essentia, we used our guest bed, which is a 25 year old (at least) double innerspring with the 2" egg crate. We both slept really well!

So here we are. I've read a bunch of posts here this morning, and I apparently had my head on backwards. My wife (5'3" and 120lbs) and I (5'9" and 145 lbs) are fairly light and are both back and side sleepers. So I guess we should have been looking at softer mattresses. So what do we do? Exchange this mattress for another Essentia? Add additional comfort layers? Return it and go with yet another brand?

Please help!
04 Nov 2015 16:13
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi lexibright,

I knew it was not apples to apples at my local mattress store just trying to get a feel for how latex feels as I know it is a big difference from anything I am used to. Now I can contact Brooklyn bedding again and give them the models of Restonic that I tested and like and we can go from there. As I do know that I'm going to be purchasing a bed from Brooklyn.


They may not be familiar with the specific Restonic models you have tried or know how soft or firm they feel to you but if you know you like the "feel" of latex in general (and "feel" is different from the firmness level of a material) and you have a general sense of whether you tend to do better on or prefer softer, medium, or firmer mattresses then this information can certainly be helpful. The medium would be the normal "default" that will be a reasonable match for the largest percentage of people.

I thought maybe the rep was referring to soy as the plant based material but she said it was a "new way" of measuring density. As you said I really don't think she knew what she was talking about. Thanks so much for your input.


I agree that they appear to be completely misinformed if they are claiming that there is some "new way" of measuring density. In North America the density of polyfoam and memory foam is generally expressed as the weight in lbs of 1 cubic ft of a foam material and is the same as it has always has been. In Europe it is generally expressed as the weight in kilograms of a cubic meter of a foam material (and this is also commonly used for latex density in North America as well).

Phoenix
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