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Searched for: Restonic
14 Mar 2018 17:36
  • cbear08
  • cbear08's Avatar
Thank you for much Phoenix! You really are so helpful.

Would you mind also looking into the Restonic Bradham ultra pillow top? The only specs I could get in the store (Haynes Furniture) was the picture I am attaching.

I also liked the Restonics Elevate Felicity but the only one they had left was the floor model, and I am pretty sure that’s never a good option.

Thank you!!
16 Oct 2017 11:19
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Csj0952,

My question now is that the Jamestown matress uses: Symetrics® 660 Offset Technology for innerspring where as the Beautyrest I believe is pocket coil which from your site appears to be superior to the offset in the jamestown one.


There is some more information about some of the basic differences in innerspring units in this article . I’m not sure where you’ve read that the mashall spring unit is superior to the Lura-Flex Symetrics used in the Jamestown mattress, as they can both be good quality and durable products, each with their own unique characteristics (as outlined in the article I linked to earlier in this paragraph).

Now I know you'll tell me that the Beautyrest Black has crummy low density polyfil in it compared to the Jamestown one but I'm wondering what you know about the innerspring design in the jamestown mattress and if that could be a weak link down the road?


No, the LFK spring unit in the Jamestown is not low quality, and the innerspring unit in a mattress is rarely the “weak link” to begin with. Regarding foam quality, yes, the Beautyrest line tends to use less dense foams (look at Jordans web site should you need some details), but I wouldn’t know the quality of the foams in the mattress you looked at from Jamestown as you didn’t provide that information, so I can’t comment upon that. I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

There's one other place I haven't tried yet in Rochester called sleep city who carries Dr. Green and America's mattress. I've never heard of these and wondering if they are on par with Sealy and Serta as far as big box brands.


A mattress is only as good as the construction and quality of the layers inside it and in the case of the Dr. Greene mattress of Serta and most major manufacturers they don't disclose the quality of the materials and I would avoid any mattress (even for testing) where there is no way to know the quality of what you are considering. No matter how it feels in a showroom ... low quality materials (especially in the upper layers) will soften and break down more rapidly and the loss of comfort and support that goes along with this can happen quite quickly (a few months to a few years) and isn't covered by a warranty ... even if you can no longer sleep on the mattress.

Also wondering about Ruby Gordon who has some kind of "bed match" system which gives you a print out of what kind of mattress your body needs. I'm not sure if this is a gimmick or if I should bother with it. They have Serta, Simmons, Restonic, and Kingsdown which all seem like big box type brands.


Most of the pressure mapping systems are specific to a certain line of mattress and aren't really relevant to mattresses as a whole which have different constructions. They also only measure surface pressure (which you can often feel in your own personal testing) but don't provide input into alignment or how the pressure is distributed in the deeper body tissues or include the differences in physiology between people (pressure affects different people differently). There are a few more comments in post #2 here and post #4 here about pressure mapping systems.

They can be a useful tool for stores that have them available and where the results can translate into the specific mattress you are most interested in but they wouldn't be the primary way I would make a purchase decision or be that useful if the mattress you are buying is different from the one you tested and the testing results can't be easily "translated" into a mattress with a different design.

Lastly, wondering if there is anything in Buffalo, Syracuse, Toronto, New York City or anything in a 3-4 hour drive worth trying...


In New York City, site members Dixie Foam Beds, Nest Bedding and Scott Jordan Furniture may be worth your consideration. Dormio Organic beds are located in Toronto if you are considering latex again. Those would be the site members listed for the areas you mentioned.

Aside from those businesses, I have discontinued the provision of listings of potential retailers in various geographic regions (unless they are already approved site members), because of the difficulty in maintaining such lists in a retail landscape that is constantly changing, and most importantly the confusion it was creating with the consumer members who incorrectly assumed that these businesses had indeed gone through the strict vetting and qualification process that is part of becoming an approved member of The Mattress Underground. Such an assumption is unfair to both the consumers seeking assistance, as well as the very businesses and manufacturers who have indeed qualified the be members here of The Mattress Underground.

You can perform a forum search on the areas you mentioned and see what other businesses have been discussed in that region on the forum which may be helpful to you.

Whatever business you’re considering, I would always confirm that any retailer or manufacturer that you wish to visit is completely transparent (see this article ) and also make sure that any mattress that you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here .

If you have any questions about specifications or certain products you discover, feel free to post back on the forum and I’ll do my best to be assistive.

Phoenix
15 Oct 2017 21:39
  • Csj0952
  • Csj0952's Avatar
Went back to Jamestown mattress, had a better experience this time. The mattress feel wasn't as good as the Beautyrest black from what I can remember but I tested the two at least a few days apart so I need to test out both on the same day I think.

My question now is that the Jamestown matress uses: Symetrics® 660 Offset Technology for innerspring where as the Beautyrest I believe is pocket coil which from your site appears to be superior to the offset in the jamestown one. Now I know you'll tell me that the Beautyrest Black has crummy low density polyfil in it compared to the Jamestown one but I'm wondering what you know about the innerspring design in the jamestown mattress and if that could be a weak link down the road?

There's one other place I haven't tried yet in Rochester called sleep city who carries Dr. Green and America's mattress. I've never heard of these and wondering if they are on par with Sealy and Serta as far as big box brands.

Also wondering about Ruby Gordon who has some kind of "bed match" system which gives you a print out of what kind of mattress your body needs. I'm not sure if this is a gimmick or if I should bother with it. They have Serta, Simmons, Restonic, and Kingsdown which all seem like big box type brands.

Lastly, wondering if there is anything in Buffalo, Syracuse, Toronto, New York City or anything in a 3-4 hour drive worth trying...
15 Sep 2017 11:51
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Afluffyone,

Thanks Phoenix! I had a feeling I was being paranoid. He's probably closer to like 220 but it should be fine. Like, the floor model I tried out at the store had been used for a year, and I'm willing to bet it was laid on a lot by people bigger than my friend.


Hey, there's nothing wrong with your question and wanting to make sure that your mattress is properly cared for and supported.

I've just heard nothing but bad things about Restonic's warranty but whatever.


I personally wouldn't put too much stock in commentary that you read online. Quite often this is from people complaining about issues that are not in fact warranty problems, or more concerned with the 3-C's (Complain, condemn, criticize). Making sure to choose a product that uses good quality and durable materials will always be your best way to not have any potential issue with a warranty claim. ;)

Phoenix
14 Sep 2017 20:21
  • Afluffyone
  • Afluffyone's Avatar
Thanks Phoenix! I had a feeling I was being paranoid. He's probably closer to like 220 but it should be fine. Like, the floor model I tried out at the store had been used for a year, and I'm willing to bet it was laid on a lot by people bigger than my friend. I've just heard nothing but bad things about Restonic's warranty but whatever. Thanks again!
14 Sep 2017 16:03
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Afluffyone,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum!

Yes, you're tripping. :) I personally would have no concerns in your situation.

And warranties cover defects in workmanship (I wouldn't agree with your "classification" of the Restonic warranty), and I wouldn't expect a defect to occur with someone 200 pounds sleeping in your mattress for a few nights. You should be fine.

Phoenix
13 Sep 2017 23:02
  • Afluffyone
  • Afluffyone's Avatar
I purchased a restonic healthrest tempagel memory foam mattress about four months ago and love it so far. The firmness is medium and I'm about 130 pounds. I'm going out of town for five days and have a friend housesitting for me, which means he'll be sleeping in my bed, but he's around 180-200 pounds. I'm a bit worried that might cause some sagging in my mattress. Am I tripping or is that something that'll probably happen? I know the Restonic warranty is basically garbage so I'm a little scared. Thanks!
16 May 2017 09:53
  • jstevanus
  • jstevanus's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,

I did some more shopping, at Gardner White, since you specifically mentioned their Restonic Tempagel. I tried it out, but the top layer was too soft, and I bottomed out to the hard coil layer pretty quickly. The sales woman had me try at least a dozen other mattresses. I really liked the feel of the Beautyrest Hybrid
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: beautyrest.com/Platinum/Maddie-Luxury-Firm
But even better, was the Tempur-Flex Supreme Breeze and the Tempur-Cloud Supreme Breeze . I'm really glad I've actually laid on the best mattresses so far. But at $4000, that's way out of my price range. I know there's no way to make a DIY bed because the "Tempur" foam they use is patented, so I'll have to keep searching stores until I find something similar. There's an Ikea near me, and they have a King MORGONGÅVA latex for $1100, so I'll go check that out. In the meantime, I emailed Ken at mattresses.net to see what he thinks would compare to a medium tempurpedic.
14 May 2017 04:45
  • William17
  • William17's Avatar
Thanks Phoenix. I considered maybe doing something like the Suite Sleep organic cotton protector (double stretch knit and nice deep pockets) rather than the thin cheap one I have on it now. It is a bit pricey though. I consider these top most layers almost "sacrificial" in that they will take the most wear over time. The thin latex layer I just bought from foamorder.com was priced very reasonable including shipping. Sold as 100% natural but I have no way to verify. Has the same feel and quality as my AZ Prem Mattress latex. The beauty of all this is that I can easily replace or change something. An option I did not have with the old Restonic memory foam mattress that became much too soft with use.

Just a couple of other comments. I really like the temperature regulation of this configuration. It does not build up heat throughout the night, a problem we had before. Stays really consistent and comfortable. Support is really nice, the zoned L&P pocket coils doing their job as advertised. I like the freedom of movement, changing positions or just getting out of bed, absolutely no stuck feeling. Just a little motion transfer from my partner, but it's not enough to wake me in the middle of the night. And going from a Queen to a Cal. King has been wonderful! That extra foot of width makes a huge difference.
08 May 2017 13:05
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Drt123,

Well I checked the black ticket on it which says "HYBRID SIGNATURE RESTONIC BALDWIN"
hand crafted by: .... no signature. It has no other numbers on it.


Your mattress should have been delivered with the “law tag” that would have contained the information listed here . A US law tag will look something like this and is required to say that the mattress includes all new materials and the type and amount of materials inside expressed as a percentage of weight along with the other information listed including the date of manufacture. Information showing that the mattress has passed the fire regulations is also required and is often included in the same tag. You can see some more of the type of information that is normally on a law tag in some of the images here .
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: americanlawlabel.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Anatomy-of-Law-Label.pdf


There normally would have been some more information on the law tag with the actual item number (used by the licensee making the mattress) and that would be the number you’d want to compare to the floor model you tested in the showroom to make sure that you have the same model that you tested.

The long white ticket is not there. Maybe the delivery guys removed it ???


It is possible that it was accidentally removed during delivery of your mattress, but you would want that attached, as many mattress manufacturers require the law tag to be affixed to the mattress in order to process any potential warranty claims, so you would want to address that also with your retailer.

The bottom line is that it feels as if it's cheap and already breaking down after 18 days. It's almost embarrassing.


While the quality of the foams (“cheap”) isn’t something that normally can be felt, and even inexpensive foams wouldn’t be “breaking down” in 18 days (although they may be settling), I do understand your concerns that this mattress isn’t representative of what you tried out in the showroom.

How do I go about getting my $ back when he said no returns UNLESS I trade up!!!!!


I can’t speak to the policies of any particular business on exchanges/returns, but the first thing I would do is to take photos of any of the tags you can find sewn into the mattress and foundation (usually at the head of the mattress or foundation) and then visit your retailer and see how that information compares to the floor model you tested (you can look at the law label on the floor model and take a photo of that and then compare). The information between the two should be consistent. If it isn’t, you can ask for a replacement model. If the information aligns but you still feel that the mattress is very inconsistent with what you tested, you can always ask for an inspection from the store to see if they can shed any light upon your concerns.

That would be my best advice on how to begin to proceed. Retailers will generally want to do their best to make you happy and deliver the exact product you desire.

Phoenix
08 May 2017 10:48
  • Drt123
  • Drt123's Avatar
Well I checked the black ticket on it which says "HYBRID SIGNATURE RESTONIC BALDWIN"
hand crafted by: .... no signature. It has no other numbers on it. The long white ticket is not there. Maybe the delivery guys removed it ??? The bottom line is that it feels as if it's cheap and already breaking down after 18 days. It's almost embarrassing. How do I go about getting my $ back when he said no returns UNLESS I trade up!!!!! I can't afford to give this guy any more $ and need a quality bed! How can I simply return it and purchase another one from another store ? I need a FIRM bed for my disability and need some talking points if he refuses to accept the return? I'm sick over this whole thing.
24 Apr 2017 15:19
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi sammie,

Thanks for adding your thoughts on your mattress buying process. I agree with much of what you stated, and there’s a few things I’d like to add.

Unfortunately, it is difficult to rely on any one resource or website for assistance because the first lesson made clear by many of these websites, deliberate or not, is to Trust No One.


You certainly should verify information of what is contained within a mattress, but this is where I actually recommend to reply upon the guidance of a reliable mattress vendor or manufacturer. As far as believing everything you read online, unfortunately it is the case that you’d want to educate yourself first so that you can personally validate information that you come across.

The major bed manufacturers are controlled by two different companies that have a virtual duopoly on the industry.


There are roughly 500 mattress brands available domestically, but according to Furniture Today approximately 92% of sales are from the Top 15 brands. Online-only companies are eating a bit into this percentage. Serta and Simmons are “partners” (owner by AOT Bedding Super Holdings, Ares Management and Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan), and Tempurpedic and Sealy combined to form Tempur/Sealy. Select Comfort comes in at #5, followed by Corsicana, Therapedic, Comfort Solutions, Englander and Restonic. These are all separate companies from Serta, Simmons and Tempur/Sealy.

They offer substandard beds that include a high percentage and variety of cheap petro-chemical foams to save costs in manufacturing, and to get you back into the mattress store as quickly as possible because preto-chemical foams are not durable.


Unfortunately many of these manufacturers are using lower density foams that do result in a shorter comfort life, but there are many polyfoams that are durable. True high-density and high-resiliency polyfoam, and even some of the newer generation of high performance ultra-high density polyfoams, can be quite durable. But these are not what you’d generally find being used by the largest mattress companies.

Perto-chemical foams, otherwise known as polyurethane foam, is bad news.


While I respect that this may be your personal opinion, I wouldn’t agree that all polyfoam is “bad news”, and personally wouldn't have a concern as long as any polyfoam being considered had at least a CertiPUR-US certification and met the minimum durability guidelines here .

Memory foam is polyurethane foam. This stuff is essentially a plastic.


Memory foam is technically a slower recovery type of polyurethane foam, that is correct. Although the starting materials in each case belong to similar broad classes (polyisocyanate and polyols in each case, together with water), those starting materials differ in their specifics, in very important ways. The HR and conventional flexible polyurethane foams are made primarily from polyether polyols that have hydroxyl equivalent weights of 1000 to 2000, whereas VE foams are made primarily from polyols that have equivalent weights that are typically 230 to 350, combined with higher equivalent weight polyols to produce a polymer with a glass transition temperature (Tg) above - 20°C and up to 50°C. While polyurethane is probably the largest member of the polymer (or plastic) group, polyurethane foam takes on many different properties from the layperson term of “plastic”.

It is cheap to manufacture and manipulate into various foams offering very different varieties and feels, levels of softness, etc.


Lower density polyfoam is less expensive to produce than higher-density poly foam, and both will generally be less expensive to produce than latex foam.

However, their ability to support weight and their durability are similar.


There are large differences in the ability of visco-elastic memory foam and standard polyfoam to support weight, and there are also large variances in their durability. Memory foam will generally have a very low resilience and a higher hysteresis (not be very supportive), where polyfoam can be made in lower ILDs that won’t be very supportive, or higher ILDs that can be quite supportive. The durability of both memory foam and polyfoam is strongly correlated to the density.

Latex foam is natural and vastly more durable than petro-chemical foam. It comes from the rubber tree. As such, it is much more expensive.


The rubber component of latex foam can be made from an all-natural source (referred to commonly as 100% NR latex), an all-synthetic source (100% SBR), or a blend of the two. The sourcing of the raw materials and the involved production process are major reasons for the higher cost of latex foam.

Many small market manufacturers offer latex mattresses that turn out to be less expensive than the traditional high dollar mattresses from the big manufactures.


Excellent point.

An all foam mattress is inert, where as a hybrid mattress offers some liveliness and bounciness, like a traditional mattress most folks have used at one time or another.


There are many all-latex mattresses that are quite buoyant in their feel, some even more “lively” than their innerspring counterparts. A foam mattress using memory foam to some extent can be very “dead” feeling and have a low resilience.

Adjustable foundations, as opposed to a classic inner spring, are considered by the websites to be a worthwhile addition to a good mattress.


Whether or not a power foundation would make a good addition to someone’s sleep set would depend upon their own personal preferences and personal value equation . I would suggest that anyone looking at a mattress take the time to determine if they will actually use the features of a power foundation to justify the added cost, as many retailers, especially the “big box” stores, are showing their mattresses almost exclusively upon power foundations to capitalize upon the current popularity of these items (and the larger sale amount ;) ).

they are not much more expensive than fancy nonadjustable foundations offered by some retailers and mattress manufacturers.


A foundation is the non-flexing bottom part of a sleep set (what some people mistakenly refer to with most beds as a box-spring). Perhaps you were referring to platform beds and bed sets? You are correct that many of these can be quite expensive.

Try to find a local mattress manufacturer or assembler that offers natural latex mattresses or some derivative at reasonable prices. There are many good ones out there.


That is excellent advice, as if someone is considering latex and has never slept upon it nothing can replace their own careful and personal testing in a showroom.


As a result of this research, I have chosen to purchase a hybrid latex mattress from a mattress assembler that happens to be endorsed on this website.


I’m happy that you’ve found something that you like – congratulations! :cheer: Many people I know in the industry who can sleep on anything they want choose a pocketed spring system with latex on top, although that should have no bearing on what anyone else decides to purchase. What did you end up ordering? I’d be interested in learning about your feedback on the item once you’ve had a chance to sleep upon it for a while.

Thanks for letting me add to your commentary.

Phoenix
21 Apr 2017 11:55
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi OnlyDreaming,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

We have begun the process of trying to find a new mattress, and, after finding one by Restonic we may be interested in, the salesman told us he would be happy to find out more information on the build for us. Unfortunately, I have no idea what the information we were given means. Do these numbers reference types that I can look up for more information, or are they basically useless to me?


I’m glad the salesperson was able to acquire some good information for you regarding the mattress, but I’m a bit sad that they weren’t able to explain it to you (to be fair, they may not know what the numbers mean, but they should ;) ). I’ll do my best to decipher this for you.

Silver Level OUTLAST Knit Cover approx. 450 gm weight per yd


This is the ticking (covering) for the mattress, and it incorporates a phase change materials (Outlast) at the Silver level. Outlast offers different levels of concentrations of their materials (listed from entry to best) of Bronze, Silver, Gold and Gold+. While a phase change material can assist a bit with temperature regulation, usage of such products in materials closest to your skin, as in a mattress pad (some brands do use Outlast) would tend to have a more noticeable impact, although it does tend to be temporary (see post #9 here ).

2” 10155 Liquid Gel Infused Quilt Foam with .5 oz per yd Milliken Cirrus FR Barrier (Low Melt Polyester+Rayon


This is your uppermost layer of foam. The numbers they seem to be using are listing the ILD first and the density next, so this would be 2” of 10 ILD (the lower the ILD, the softer the foam), 1.55 lb density polyfoam. Quilt foam is usually soft. There is a liquid gel polymer mixed with the foam that can also assist a bit with temperature regulation (see post #2 here ) and in some cases can increase the durability of a softer polyfoam. The Milliken Cirrus is a flame resistant barrier used to meet federal flammability guidelines 16 CFR 1632 and 1633.
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: milliken.com/en-us/pands/Documents/PALADIN%20nonwovens%20sep%202011.pdf

In the Eurotop (2 layers of foam)
1” 08325 Gel infused Memory Foam with Silver Level OUTLAST on surface


1” of 8 ILD 3.25 lb memory foam. Gel infused. I don’t know if this is a liquid gel polymer or scrap gel pieces.

1” 15150 Gel Infused Poly

1” if 15 ILD 1.5 lb polyfoam. Gel infused. I don’t know if this is a liquid gel polymer or scrap gel pieces.

Foam Encasement


I’m assuming this means that the innerspring unit has a polyfoam edge reinforcement system.

1”24180 Soy Based Poly


1” of 24 ILD 1.8 lb polyfoam. I’m assuming that this is on top of the innerspring unit and isn’t referring to the foam edge encasement, as that would be quite thin at only 1”. The “soy based” just means that some of the polyol used to make polyfoam is soy derived, versus petroleum. Most polyfoams in North America are using some sort of soy derived polyol in their polyfoam.

8” 7 turn zoned Pocketed coil densified to 800+ coil count 1.6mm diameter wire head and foot 1.8mm diameter wire center


This is a pocketed spring unit using approximately 15 gauge springs in the middle third and approximately 16 gauge springs at the head and the foot of the mattress. I’m not sure of the number of springs in each size, as they aren’t specific.

1” 28110 poly on bottom


This would be the base polyfoam under the innerspring unit, at 28 ILD and 1.1 lb density.

Overall, this mattress uses an amount of foam on top that is a little lower than I’d normally recommend in density (see the durability guidelines here ). The 2” of 1.5 density in the quilt is stitched down, so this can help a bit with impressions, but combined with the 2” of foam beneath (3.25 lb memory foam and 1.5 lb poly), this results in 4” of softer foam and my concern would be the durability over time of these materials, especially if someone was in a higher BMI range.

There’s more detailed information about what you need to know about the components of a mattress in the mattress shopping tutorial here .

If you have other questions, I’ll do my best to answer them.

Phoenix
20 Apr 2017 18:26
  • OnlyDreaming
  • OnlyDreaming's Avatar
We have begun the process of trying to find a new mattress, and, after finding one by Restonic we may be interested in, the salesman told us he would be happy to find out more information on the build for us. Unfortunately, I have no idea what the information we were given means. Do these numbers reference types that I can look up for more information, or are they basically useless to me?

Silver Level OUTLAST Knit Cover approx. 450 gm weight per yd

2” 10155 Liquid Gel Infused Quilt Foam with .5 oz per yd Milliken Cirrus FR Barrier (Low Melt Polyester+Rayon

In the Eurotop
1” 08325 Gel infused Memory Foam with Silver Level OUTLAST on surface
1” 15150 Gel Infused Poly

Foam Encasement
1”24180 Soy Based Poly
8” 7 turn zoned Pocketed coil densified to 800+ coil count 1.6mm diameter wire head and foot 1.8mm diameter wire center
1” 28110 poly on bottom
25 Mar 2017 14:20
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi William17,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Hello, new member from Excelsior Springs, MO here. Wow what a wealth of information this place is!

I hope the information presented here is useful. Be sure to take a few minutes and read through the mattress shopping tutorial to assist you as you go through the mattress buying process.

Currently in the midst of trying to find a new mattress to replace our 5 year old Restonic memory foam model. Felt pretty good the first few years but I have progressively developed more and more lower back pain as the foam has broken down and become overly soft and developed body impressions.

I’m sorry your current mattress is breaking down so soon.

Spouse and I are both about 5'7", One of us on the heavy side, maybe 300 or so. Both side sleepers. Hoping to get a mattress with proper support without being punished with something too firm.

A higher BMI presents special challenges and generally requires firmer materials (in the support layers especially). This could be firmer latex or innersprings (the type of support component would be a personal preference and in the right design either could be suitable) or even a zoned construction. The same overall guidelines apply with higher weights though that PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) along with using high quality durable materials that will maintain their feel and performance for longer periods of time are the way to make the best choices. Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any types of mattress and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

Hoping to get a mattress with proper support without being punished with something too firm. Currently thinking a hybrid pocket coil / latex like the "Ultimate Hybrid" at mattresses.net might be a good choice (with their KD foundation). Likely in a Cal King since our Queen is just too small for us and our "furry kid" and our MBR would not fit an Eastern King very well (long and narrow room). Can't decide if "only" 3" of latex would be enough over the coils and which firmness to choose for each side.

You’d certainly be considering an item that used higher quality materials with the hybrid model. For the best advice as to whether the 3” of latex would “be enough” for you, I suggest a phone call to mattresses.net (a site member here, which means that I think highly of them and their advice and products) and explain to them your current situation and what you’re attempting to accomplish. Their detailed knowledge of their mattresses and how they fit with different body types and sleeping positions along with your feedback from any local testing, a customer base of many people that they can use as reference points, and any exchange, return, or any options they have available to customize a mattress after a purchase can help lower the risk of an online purchase. These online retailers or manufacturers can also be a good "value reference" for local purchases to make sure that if you are paying a "premium" for a local purchase (in exchange for the kind of "in person" guidance, service, and value that comes with dealing with a local retailer that can help you make more "accurate" choices that you have tested in person) is not too high.

If you wish to look at some items locally (near Kansas City), subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list you wish to deal with is completely transparent (see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets your specific criteria and the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Kansas City area are listed in post #2 here .

I’ll look forward to learning about your progress and any other specific questions that you may have.

Phoenix
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