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Searched for: Amerisleep
05 Sep 2016 13:04
  • portocar
  • portocar's Avatar
Phoenix

I've started calling around and was hoping you might be able to make some clarifications on the info I have received from several sellers:

1) One seller, dream foam bedding, said they use "gel foam" to deal with the heat issues related to memory-foam. Unfortunately, when I spoke to other sellers that do not use gel foam, they said that gel-foam is toxic, another said that, yes, it does discipate heat initially, but then you get hot again later. Another seller said they don't use gel-foam because it does not last very long.

a. is gel-foam toxic
b. How durable is it?
c. does it heat up after a short amount of time?

2) I spoke with chritelli and they told me that their beds are similar to TEMPUPEDIC. However, when I spoke to other sellers about Chistelli, they said that CHristelli uses quilted covers/toper, which kills the whole point of memory-foam. In other words, memory foam should not have very little between the person sleeping on it and the foam.

a. does the quilted cover/topper of Christelli diminish the memory-foam experience?

3) I spoke with a company called Amerisleep. They claim to use a natural foam called "Bio-pur". They claim it solves not only the heat issues, but is also safer cause its natural. This all sounds great, but they are also one of the most expensive choices.

a. does Bio-pur keep you cooler?
b. does bio-our work as well as other memory foams?
c. Is Amerisleep legit?

Thanks,

Pcar
23 Aug 2016 00:27
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi JustBelieveFitness,

I live in Spokane WA. I would appreciate a lookup like you said


Subject to confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent (see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ) ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Spokane and Coeur d'Alene areas are listed in post #4 here .

Phoenix
22 Aug 2016 21:47
  • JustBelieveFitness
  • JustBelieveFitness's Avatar
Thanks for the extremely detailed response. Looks like I have some homework to do. I live in Spokane WA. I would appreciate a lookup like you said. Thanks!
22 Aug 2016 21:39
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi JustBelieveFitness,

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

I have read so many great reviews on the Revere mattresses.


While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular store or business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

I get worried blind buying a mattress though and have laid on a Tempurpedc Cloud Supreme Breeze. I loved it but I like the though of an all natural type mattress and also the price of the Amerisleep. Anyone have any advice? Im not into firm mattresses and the Revere says is more on the firm side. Advice is appreciated.


Neither one of the mattresses you mentioned use natural materials because the polyfoam and memory foam that they both use are synthetic materials made primarily from petrochemicals.

You can read more about Amerisleep and their sister companies and their so called "expert sites" that pose as being independent review sites in post #2 here and the posts it links to. A forum search on Amerisleep (you can just click the link) will bring up will bring up all the forum posts that mention them as well.

While I can't speak to how the Revere (or any mattress) will feel to you or whether it will be a good match in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP ... in terms of durability the Revere uses 3" of 4 lb memory foam which would be suitable for more average BMI ranges (less than 30) but the 1.65 lb polyfoam base layer is a little lower than the minimum density guidelines I would normally suggest for a mattress in this budget range and there are better quality/value and more durable choices available to you.

Unlike the other major brands ... for the most part Tempurpedic uses good quality materials in their mattresses but there are certainly other local and online options that would be better quality/value choices than Tempurpedic which tend to be significantly overpriced compared to other memory foam mattresses that use similar quality/density materials that may be just as suitable, just as durable, and better "value" choices (see post #2 here ). With Tempurpedic you are paying a significant premium for the name on the label which has little to nothing to do with the quality and durability of the materials or how well you will sleep on a mattress.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

If you are researching online memory foam mattresses then the mattress shopping tutorial includes this link to a list of some of the better online memory foam options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) and several of them make memory foam mattresses that they describe as being reasonable approximations of the general firmness of many of the Tempurpedic mattresses. Several of the other retailers or manufacturers that are on the list that don't specifically describe their mattresses as being similar to one of the Tempurpedic models would probably also be able to give you more information about which of their mattress would be the closest approximation to a Tempurpedic mattress that you prefer as well.

There may also be some local choices that would be worth considering as well and if you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
22 Aug 2016 21:19
  • JustBelieveFitness
  • JustBelieveFitness's Avatar
Hello, I have read so many great reviews on the Revere mattresses. I get worried blind buying a mattress though and have laid on a Tempurpedc Cloud Supreme Breeze. I loved it but I like the though of an all natural type mattress and also the price of the Amerisleep. Anyone have any advice? Im not into firm mattresses and the Revere says is more on the firm side. Advice is appreciated.
22 Aug 2016 11:52
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Substance-p,

The challenge is that my wife is 5'4" 120lbs, sleeps on her side, and has a history of arthritis meaning she needs good pressure relief. She really prefers a soft (i.e. plus/pillow top) mattress. I'm 5'9" and 225. I sleep on my back-in part because sleeping on my side leads to numbness in my shoulders and arms (as an avid weightlifter, I'm fairly broad in the shoulders and struggle to find a good option for side sleeping that allows my shoulders to sink far enough into the mattress).


It's not unusual at all for a couple to have different needs and preferences and there is more information in the first part of post #2 here about some of the different ways that can be used to accommodate a couple that have very different body types or sleeping styles or different needs and preferences in a mattress. Of course the only way to know whether any specific mattress will be suitable for both of you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) will be based on your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) or your own personal experience.when you sleep on it.

Zoning systems of various types can sometimes be useful and worth considering for people that have more difficulty finding a mattress with the right "balance" between comfort/pressure relief (under the shoulders especially) and support/alignment (under the hips/pelvis especially) or who have more challenging circumstances or sensitivities, body types that are more difficult to "match" to a mattress, more complex medical issues, or who have a history of having more difficulty in finding a mattress that works well for them. There is more about zoning in this article and in post #11 here and the additional posts it links to but once again the only way to know whether any specific mattress (zoned or otherwise) will be a good "match" for you in terms of PPP will be based on your own careful testing and/or your own personal experience.

We have tried an all latex mattress before we owned the Tempur Cloud, and it was not a favorite of ours. Although it had a cool sleeping experience and nice support, we seem to have a strong preference for memory foam or at least memory foam-based hybrids.


Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ). The best way to know which types of materials or mattresses you tend to prefer in general terms will be based on your own local testing or your own personal experience.

Each mattress category can include hundreds of different mattresses with a very wide range of different designs, different "feels", different characteristics, and different firmness levels. Every individual layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting material) will affect the feel and response of every other layer and component both above and below it and the mattress "as a whole" so each mattress category will generally include some mattresses that have a design that will be a good "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP and others that use the same type of materials and components and are in the same category and may be just as durable but have a different design or firmness level that may be completely unsuitable for you to sleep on ... even if it uses the same general type of materials and components.

At this point, we have laid on just about every mattress out there at the major retailers and have found the Cloud Luxe Breeze to be a favorite (but I'm not wanting to spend that degree of money on a bed at this point). We also found Beautyrest black hybrids (in plush or luxury firm with a pillowtop to be comfortable).


The major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (along with the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

Unlike the other major brands ... for the most part Tempurpedic uses good quality materials in their mattresses but there are certainly other local and online options that would be better quality/value choices than Tempurpedic which tend to be significantly overpriced compared to other memory foam mattresses that use similar quality/density materials that may be just as suitable, just as durable, and better "value" choices (see post #2 here ). With Tempurpedic you are paying a significant premium for the name on the label which has little to nothing to do with the quality and durability of the materials or how well you will sleep on a mattress.

Having said that ... your BMI is higher than average (about 33) so there is also more information in post #3 here and the posts it links to that would be helpful for those that are in higher weight ranges or have a higher BMI.

While the process of how to choose a mattress would involve the same steps that are listed in the mattress shopping tutorial ... most people in higher weight ranges (or that have a higher BMI) will generally need or prefer firmer mattresses (firmer materials will feel softer because you will sink into them more) and materials and components that are higher quality and more durable than those that are in lower weight ranges (the materials and components in a mattress will soften and break down faster for those in higher weight ranges than they will for someone that is in a lower weight range that doesn't compress the mattress as much). I would be particularly cautious about mattresses that use more than "about an inch or so" of memory foam that is less than about 5 lb density or polyfoam that is less than about 2 lb density ... particularly in the upper layers of the mattress (which would include the Tempurpedic Cloud Luxe Breeze).

In looking through the members' list on the forum, I haven't found a lot of memory foam options that are national, but of those I have found I have looked closely at the Pure Crafted TrueEssence comfort firm (their softest). It is listed at 2.25" of 4lb gel memory foam, 5.5" of 2.4lb high density foam, and 3" of 1.8lb base foam.


If you are researching online memory foam mattresses then the mattress shopping tutorial includes this link to a list of some of the better online memory foam options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) and several of them make memory foam mattresses that they describe as being reasonable approximations of the general firmness of many of the Tempurpedic mattresses. Several of the other retailers or manufacturers that are on the list that don't specifically describe their mattresses as being similar to one of the Tempurpedic models would probably also be able to give you more information about which of their mattress would be the closest approximation to a Tempurpedic mattress that you prefer as well.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

I would suggest looking for mattresses that use materials that are suitable for your weight range to reduce the risk of choosing a mattress that may need to be replaced more quickly than you would hope for or alternatively if you do end up choosing a mattress that uses materials that would be more suitable for someone in a lower weight range then I would reduce your expectations about the durability and useful life of the mattress and how long it may be before you need to replace it accordingly.

I have also been considering the Amerisleep Colonial 2" of 4lb 11ILD on top, 4" of 1.65lb 23ILD in the middle, and 7" of 1.8lb 35ILD as a base. I have read the forum posts on Amerisleep and liked that is similar to the Cloud Luxe but also understand that although it is just inside the specs of "okay" for each layer, it may not be the most robust. Amerisleep recently adding a new bed, the Independence, that is also supposed to have a softer feel but I wondered your opinion on the materials: 2" of 4lb 11ILD top, 3" of 3lb 11ILD middle, and 9" of 1.65lb 40ILD foundation.


These all include lower quality/density and less durable materials than I would suggest in your BMI range.

If there are any other Cloude Luxe similar options out there that would be okay for a heavier sleeper, I'd love to track them down. Novosbed is about the only other one that I can seem to find. I am also someone who is okay with a slightly shorter mattress life for a more comfortable bed.


Off the top of my head ... Novosbed (in their medium firmness level), and Rocky Mountain Mattress, and Tempflow, and Foamorder, and Christeli all make at least one or more mattresses that use 5 lb or higher memory foam but you would need to check their websites or talk to them to find out how they compared to any of the Tempurpedic mattresses.

I should note that I am located in Indianapolis and have checked the forum for recommended options in this area; although, there were some recommendations provided- I didn't see many that have a product similar to what we are looking for (memory foam).


I don't keep a record of the individual mattresses or their specs that the retailers and manufacturers in the hundreds of forum lists throughout the forum carry on their floor or have available online (it would be a bigger job than anyone could keep up with in a constantly changing market) but checking their websites and making some preliminary phone calls to the retailers/manufacturers that are on the local lists is always a good idea before you decide on which retailers or manufacturers you wish to deal with anyway. This will tell you which of them carry mattresses that would meet your specific criteria, are transparent about the materials in their mattresses, and that carry the type of mattresses that you are interested in that are also in the budget range you are comfortable with. Once you have checked their websites and/or talked with the ones that interest you then you will be in a much better position to decide on the ones that you are most interested in considering or visiting based on the results of your preliminary research and conversations.

In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person (or couple) really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
22 Aug 2016 10:21
  • Substance-p
  • Substance-p's Avatar
I've been reading through the forum and I think I have covered all of the tutorials and overviews-very helpful

My wife and I are looking for a replacement for our 7 year old Tempurpedic Cloud (it's maintaining body impressions and sleeping hot). We have tried two other replacements to no avail: Wink beds which I liked fairly well but was too hard for her and the Alexander Hybrid which showed up damaged in transit and we tried it for a little while but it was not a good of a fit for us.

The challenge is that my wife is 5'4" 120lbs, sleeps on her side, and has a history of arthritis meaning she needs good pressure relief. She really prefers a soft (i.e. plus/pillow top) mattress. I'm 5'9" and 225. I sleep on my back-in part because sleeping on my side leads to numbness in my shoulders and arms (as an avid weightlifter, I'm fairly broad in the shoulders and struggle to find a good option for side sleeping that allows my shoulders to sink far enough into the mattress).

We have tried an all latex mattress before we owned the Tempur Cloud, and it was not a favorite of ours. Although it had a cool sleeping experience and nice support, we seem to have a strong preference for memory foam or at least memory foam-based hybrids.

At this point, we have laid on just about every mattress out there at the major retailers and have found the Cloud Luxe Breeze to be a favorite (but I'm not wanting to spend that degree of money on a bed at this point). We also found Beautyrest black hybrids (in plush or luxury firm with a pillowtop to be comfortable).

In looking through the members' list on the forum, I haven't found a lot of memory foam options that are national, but of those I have found I have looked closely at the Pure Crafted TrueEssence comfort firm (their softest). It is listed at 2.25" of 4lb gel memory foam, 5.5" of 2.4lb high density foam, and 3" of 1.8lb base foam.

I have also been considering the Amerisleep Colonial 2" of 4lb 11ILD on top, 4" of 1.65lb 23ILD in the middle, and 7" of 1.8lb 35ILD as a base. I have read the forum posts on Amerisleep and liked that is similar to the Cloud Luxe but also understand that although it is just inside the specs of "okay" for each layer, it may not be the most robust. Amerisleep recently adding a new bed, the Independence, that is also supposed to have a softer feel but I wondered your opinion on the materials: 2" of 4lb 11ILD top, 3" of 3lb 11ILD middle, and 9" of 1.65lb 40ILD foundation.

My only concerns RE the TruEssence is that it is hard to find user feedback (I'm sure it's high quality, I'm just not sure about a comparable feeling bed to test out ahead of time), and I am not sure if it will be soft enough for my wife. My concern with the Amerisleep Colonial is that the density of the foams falls just inside the okay range-prompting my question about the Independence, with its different core foam, as a potential option.

If there are any other Cloude Luxe similar options out there that would be okay for a heavier sleeper, I'd love to track them down. Novosbed is about the only other one that I can seem to find. I am also someone who is okay with a slightly shorter mattress life for a more comfortable bed.

I should note that I am located in Indianapolis and have checked the forum for recommended options in this area; although, there were some recommendations provided- I didn't see many that have a product similar to what we are looking for (memory foam).
29 Jul 2016 15:26
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi MOB17,

Hello friends! I've READ AND READ and researched and tried out so many different mattresses I want to throw up and punch myself in the face!

I want a bed that lasts. Yes, yes comfort, support, but I don't want to throw my money down the toilet.


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress but outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines I linked earlier in this reply relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ). The best way to know which types of materials or mattresses you tend to prefer in general terms will be based on your own local testing or your own personal experience.

I'm looking for help figuring out if these mattresses are any good and the foam latex is quality.

Jordan's 10 inch Memory Foam

Cover and Quilt:
Stretch Knit Polyester Cover
FR Sock

Comfort Layers:
1.5" 4 LB Memory foam
1.5" Talalay Latex

Support System:
7" 1.8LB Polyfoam


These are all good quality materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links that would be a cause for concern in terms of durability relative to more "average" weight ranges (around the lower 200's or less) although with the 4 lb memory foam and the 1.8 lb polyfoam base layer I would be cautious if you are in a higher weight range.


Jordan's Mattress Factory Carpathian Firm

Cover and Quilt:
Stretch Knit Cover
FR Fibers
1/2" Bio based foam 1.2LB density
1/2" Bio based foam 1.2LB density

Comfort Layers:
1" 100% Latex Rubber 28ILD
2" 100% Latex Rubber 28ILD

Support System:
6" 2.0 LB Polyfoam

BELOW FOAM CORE
3/4" Eco Fiber Pad


The two 1/2" layers of polyfoam in the quilting are lower quality/density materials but because they are only "around an inch or so" they won't affect the durability of the mattress.

All the other materials are good quality materials so there are no lower quality materials or weak links that would compromise the durability or useful life of this mattress even relative to higher weight ranges.

This mattress is a latex/polyfoam hybrid that uses latex in the comfort layers and the first one you listed is a memory foam mattress and uses memory foam in comfort layers so they are in completely different categories. Latex and memory foam are very different materials with very different properties but again the choice between them is more of a preference and budget choice than a "better/worse" choice. There is more about some of the differences between memory foam and latex in post #2 here . Some people tend to prefer the faster response and more resilient and "on the mattress" feel of latex and some prefer the slower response and more "in the mattress" feel of memory foam but the best way to know which type of materials or mattresses you tend to prefer in general terms would be based on your own careful testing and/or your own personal experience with each material in a range of different firmness levels.

LAURA ASHLEY HERITAGE COLLECTION ELENA 12 INCH FOAM MATTRESS:

Cover and Quilt:
Stretch Knit Cover
Anti-Microbial FR Fiber

Comfort Layers:
2" 3lb. Gel-Infused Memory Foam
2" Ventilated Polyfoam (density not listed)

Support System:
8" High Density Polyfoam (Density not listed).


It's not possible to make any meaningful comments about the durability of this mattress because several of the layers don't include the density of the foam they are using but the 2" of 3 lb memory foam is lower quality/density than I would consider and would be a weak link in the mattress even if the other foam layers are a good quality/density material. I would avoid this mattress.

I'm also looking at AmeriSleep
3" of our Bio-Pur memory foam 4llb density.. It's our large, open -cell memory foam that is made with plant based materials
And the bottom layer is 9" of our Bio-Core Support foam.
The medium soft option has an additional layer. They have a $200 discount.


This is also a memory foam mattress.

You can read more about Amerisleep and their sister companies and their so called "expert sites" that pose as being independent review sites in post #2 here and the posts it links to. A forum search on Amerisleep (you can just click the link) will bring up will bring up all the forum posts that mention them as well.

I'm assuming that based on the specs you listed that you are looking at their Revere mattress. While I can't speak to how the Revere (or any mattress) will feel to you or whether it will be a good match in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP ... in terms of durability the Revere uses 3" of 4 lb memory foam which would be suitable for more average weight ranges but the 1.65 lb polyfoam base layer is a little lower than the minimum density guidelines I would normally suggest for a mattress in this budget range.

Loom and Leaf:
Support base is 5.5" of high density foam core
Transition loft pad 2". They call it a " luxurious transfer layer which rests between our support layer and memory foam layer."
-Next is 5lb visco elastic memory foam layer which is 2.5" visco elastic memory foam certified by CertiPUR-US®,
- Above that is 2" of our convoluted memory foam layer which uses a “gel-swirl” construction technique that provides even distribution,
That's what the sales person wrote "our convoluted memory foam layer"


This is also a memory foam mattress.

There are some comments about the Loom & Leaf along with many of the other "simplified choice" online mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice mattress topic and the first post in the same topic would probably be worth reading as well. There are also some more detailed comments in post #5 here . A forum search on Loom Leaf (you can just click the link) will also bring up more comments and feedback about it as well.

They don't disclose the densities of their polyfoam base layers and I would tend to avoid this mattress as well.

My biggest worries are smell, sleeping hot, and the product lasting.


There can be an initial smell to some mattresses that can vary based on the materials in the mattress ... if the materials have a reliable safety certification (see post #2 here ) then any initial smell wouldn't be a safety issue and it will generally dissipate to levels that aren't noticeable for most people within a few days.

While it's not possible to quantify the sleeping temperature of a mattress for any particular person with any real accuracy because there are so many variables involved including the type of mattress protector and the sheets and bedding that you use (which in many cases can have just as significant an effect on sleeping temperature as the type of foam in a mattress) and on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range and because there is no standardized testing for temperature regulation with different combinations of materials ... there is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here that can help you choose the types of materials and components that are most likely to keep you in a comfortable temperature range.

There are many variations of each type of foam material (latex foam, memory foam, polyfoam) but in very general terms latex is generally the most breathable and "temperature neutral" of all the foam materials followed by polyfoam followed by memory foam. While only a minority of people that sleep on memory foam have temperature regulation issues ... the ones that do are a higher percentage than with other types of foam.

If you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area..

If you are also considering online options then the mattress shopping tutorial includes several links to lists of many of the better online options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) that include many different types and categories of mattresses that use different materials and components in a wide range of designs, budgets, firmness levels, and with different return/exchange policies that may be well worth considering as well (assuming that the materials and components in any mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body weight).

In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
29 Jul 2016 14:23
  • MOB17
  • MOB17's Avatar
Hello friends! I've READ AND READ and researched and tried out so many different mattresses I want to throw up and punch myself in the face!

I want a bed that lasts. Yes, yes comfort, support, but I don't want to throw my money down the toilet.

I'm looking for help figuring out if these mattresses are any good and the foam latex is quality.

Jordan's (Local company)
10 inch Memory Foam $957
Quilt: Stretch Knit Polyester Cover
FR Sock
Comfort Layers: 1.5" SmarTemp Memory foam 4LB
1.5" Talalay Latex 14 ILD
Support System: 7" foam 1.8LB - 30ILD
All polyurethane and memory foam layers
are CertiPur certified
The latex is Okeo-Tex certified
Mattress Type: Latex,Memory Foam,Power Base Compatible

Name: Carpathian Firm $1297
Jordan's Mattress Factory
Quilt: Stretch Knit Cover with Max Breeze
FR Fibers
1/2" Bio based foam 1.2LB density
1/2" Bio based foam 1.2LB density
Comfort Layers: 1" 100% Latex Rubber 28ILD
2" 100% Latex Rubber 28ILD
No Fillers
Support System: 6" Bio Based Foam Core 2.0LB 27ILD
BELOW FOAM CORE
3/4" Eco Fiber Pad
Power Base Compatible
Mattress Type: Latex
Origin: Made in New England


LAURA ASHLEY HERITAGE COLLECTION ELENA 12 INCH FOAM MATTRESS
This one we are getting a clearance price on because the warehouse has extra stock Normally 1300 we're getting it for $900.
Breathable Stretch Knit Cover
Anti-Microbial FR Fiber
2" 3lb. FuturaGel® Gel-Infused Memory Foam
2" Ventilated Easy Breathe Foam
8" High Density Base Foam
5 Zoned Ventilated Shoulder Foam for Increased Airflow
Eco-Friendly Titan Foundation
Certi-PUR Certified US Foam


I'm also looking at AmeriSleep
3" of our Bio-Pur memory foam 4llb density.. It's our large, open -cell memory foam that is made with plant based materials
And the bottom layer is 9" of our Bio-Core Support foam.
The medium soft option has an additional layer. They have a $200 discount.


Loom and Leaf:
Support base is 5.5" of high density foam core
Transition loft pad 2". They call it a " luxurious transfer layer which rests between our support layer and memory foam layer."
-Next is 5lb visco elastic memory foam layer which is 2.5" visco elastic memory foam certified by CertiPUR-US®,
- Above that is 2" of our convoluted memory foam layer which uses a “gel-swirl” construction technique that provides even distribution,
That's what the sales person wrote "our convoluted memory foam layer"

My biggest worries are smell, sleeping hot, and the product lasting.

My husband and I aren't sleeping anymore. At ALL. I can't wait much longer, I just don't want to waste money.

Thank you for help and advice!
Molly
20 Jul 2016 15:45
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jsuehl,

Wow, I didn't realize that there were so many local manufacturers. I have tried T&N, and it didn't agree with my body at all. Also tried Arizona Premium Mattress and had to return that too.


Tuft & Needle only makes one mattress but Arizona Premium makes a very wide range of mattresses that have different designs and firmness levels so it's certainly possible that one of their mattresses may be a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP.

It has made me think that Latex just isn't supportive enough for me because i was on very firm latex, yet my hips felt unsupported..


You mentioned this is a previous post and you can see my comments in my previous reply here . Latex is the most "supportive" of all the foam materials and it's more likely that the design of the mattress and the specific combination of layers and components you tried just weren't a good "match" for you in terms of PPP.

Firmer materials are not necessarily more "supportive" and if you sleep on the floor as an example (which would be firmer than any mattress) it would certainly provide very poor support that wouldn't keep your spine in neutral alignment.

"Support" is often misunderstood because the goal of a "supportive" mattress is to keep the spine and joints in good alignment and this requires the type of contouring support that allows some parts of the body to sink in more (softer) and some parts of the body to sink in less (firmer) and this will vary on an individual basis based on body type and sleeping style. There is more about primary or "deep" support and secondary or "surface" support and their relationship to firmness and pressure relief and the "roles" of different layers in a mattress in post #2 here and in post #4 here that may also be helpful in clarifying the difference between "support/alignment" and "comfort/pressure relief" and "feel" and how they interact together.

Now I'm wondering if it's just a 100% poly foam bed due to the firmness I chose (I chose a medium firm). Is that bad if it is as far as it lasting and retaining support over the long term?


All their different options include microcoils, polyfoam, and Dunlop latex but they are used in different orders and the polyfoam and latex can have different firmness levels as well depending on the specific design.

You can see my thoughts about the type and quality of the materials in the Helix mattress along with many of the other simplified choice mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice topic and post #1 in the same topic would be worth reading as well. For those that are in a more "average" weight range there would be no lower quality materials or weak links that are likely to compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress.
20 Jul 2016 13:52
  • jsuehl
  • jsuehl's Avatar
Phoenix - Wow, I didn't realize that there were so many local manufacturers. I have tried T&N, and it didn't agree with my body at all. Also tried Arizona Premium Mattress and had to return that too.

I will be in Denver for a few weeks - are there any companies with showrooms there I should try?

I like the idea of Latex because it is the most natural, so I've tried two of them - Az Premium Mattress and Flobeds. I really thought Flobeds would work. Because I was concerned about it not being supportive enough after my experience with Az Premium Mattress, I even ordered the Super Firm Core and paid extra for it, but still I couldn't get away from a lower back ache coming on half way through the night. I had to use a topper with it because it felt hard from a "feel" standpoint, but my hips just felt like they sank too much. I was able to move all the layers around and try different configurations, but nothing worked. It has made me think that Latex just isn't supportive enough for me because i was on very firm latex, yet my hips felt unsupported.. Unless somehow their "zoning" causes it to loose support since the pieces are not fused between zones. They were great to work with and I was very disappointed that it didn't work out. I haven't tried Dunlap Latex - maybe that would be different. I wish Latex would work for me but I'm not sure I should give it a third try.

I just called about my Helix bed and they said the top layer is poly foam because of the firmness I choose, and the bottom layer has "some" latex in it, but the rep sounded a little unsure about the bottom layer. Now I'm wondering if it's just a 100% poly foam bed due to the firmness I chose (I chose a medium firm). Is that bad if it is as far as it lasting and retaining support over the long term?
20 Jul 2016 10:11
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jsuehl,

Thanks for the feedback Phoenix. I live in Phoenix, Arizona (85022), so if there is anywhere with showrooms here you would recommend looking at please do let me know.


The better options and possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Phoenix area (subject to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines I linked at the beginning of my last reply) are listed in post #4 here .

You are fortunate to live where you do since several of the manufacturing members of this site are based there which gives you the chance to test mattresses in person that most of the rest of the members that live in other areas of the country can only order online without being able to test them first.

Phoenix
20 Jul 2016 08:14
  • jsuehl
  • jsuehl's Avatar
Thanks for the feedback Phoenix. I live in Phoenix, Arizona (85022), so if there is anywhere with showrooms here you would recommend looking at please do let me know.

I have put a topper on my Helix bed and it is feeling better, so I'm going to give it some more time.

I read your post about the various on-line mattress retailers and found it to be quite helpful. Through trying various mattresses I have come to agree that you just have no idea how your body will react until you sleep on it. It sounds like Novosbed might be a good option to try next to test a memory foam bed if Helix doesn't work out. I haven't tried a memory foam bed yet and I like that they have been around a little longer, use quality materials and can adjust the firmness if needed.

Thanks again!

Julie
17 Jul 2016 11:34
  • Napper
  • Napper's Avatar
Contact the doctor at selectabed who designed them. They are pricey but when you look at the overall picturte and take everything into consideration, it is very tempting to my way of thinking. .He would suggest which of his beds he thinks would be best for you and if it doesn't work out they will work with you to make you satisfied through adjustments or a refund.
17 Jul 2016 09:42
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jsuehl,

I've tried a bunch of mattresses and am struggling to find one that works for me. I sleep on my back and side. My back prefers a firmer mattress, but my shoulders prefer something softer. I've tried two Latex mattresses, including Flobeds, but latex just doesn't seem to have enough support for my lower back.


Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ).

Each mattress category can include hundreds of different mattresses with a very wide range of different designs, different "feels", different characteristics, and different firmness levels. Every individual layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting material) will affect the feel and response of every other layer and component both above and below it and the mattress "as a whole" so each mattress category will generally include some mattresses that will be a good "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) and others that use the same type of materials and components and are in the same category may but have a different design or firmness level that may be completely unsuitable for you to sleep on ... even if it uses the same general type of materials and components.

Latex comes in a wide range of firmness levels but in general terms is a more "supportive" material than other types of foam because it has a higher compression modulus (the rate that a foam material becomes firmer as you compress it more deeply) than either memory foam or polyfoam in the same firmness level so if a mattress isn't a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP then it would be more because the specific design of the mattress (the thickness and firmness of the layers and components in the mattress) wasn't a good "match" for you than because of the specific type of materials.

Zoning systems (such as Flobed's vZone) can sometimes be useful and worth considering for people that have more difficulty finding a mattress with the right "balance" between comfort/pressure relief (under the shoulders especially) and support/alignment (under the hips/pelvis especially) or who have more challenging circumstances or sensitivities, body types that are more difficult to "match" to a mattress, more complex medical issues, or who have a history of having more difficulty in finding a mattress that works well for them. There is more about zoning in this article and in post #11 here and the additional posts it links to but the only way to know whether any specific mattress (zoned or otherwise) will be a good "match" for you in terms of PPP will be based on your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) or your own personal experience when you sleep on it.

I've tried Helix and T&N, also which also weren't enough support for my lower back. The only one that solved my lower back pain was Sealy Posturpedic Hybrid, but I returned it because I don't think it will last - too many reviewers said it broke down quickly,


The major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (along with the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

In other words you were wise to avoid it.

I haven't tried a true memory foam mattress, so I think that might be worth a shot. I am considering Loom & Leaf or Amerisleep. On both I am not sure whether to get the firmer version (Revere from Ameriasleep) or the medium firm (Liberty from Amerisleep). I think the support for my lower back is more important that the shoulder comfort because the back pain wakes me up in the night and is more intense than the shoulder stiffness which is more of a "next day" phenomena. Has anyone tried both of these mattresses, and do you have any advise? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!


Again the type of materials and components or the category of mattress is a preference choice more than a better/worse choice so just like any other type of mattress ... some memory foam mattresses may be a suitable "match" for you and others may also be unsuitable for you to sleep on.

While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

There is more about the 3 most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that once again you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

There are some comments about the Loom & Leaf along with many of the other "simplified choice" online mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice mattress topic and the first post in the same topic would probably be worth reading as well. There are also some more detailed comments in post #5 here . A forum search on Loom Leaf (you can just click the link) will also bring up more comments and feedback about it as well.

You can read more about Amerisleep and their sister companies and their so called "expert sites" that pose as being independent review sites in post #2 here and the posts it links to. A forum search on Amerisleep (you can just click the link) will bring up will bring up all the forum posts that mention them as well.

While I can't speak to how either of the Amerisleep mattresses will feel to you or whether they will be a good match in terms of PPP ... in terms of durability the Liberty uses 1.5 lb polyfoam in the transition and base layers which are a lower density material than I would normally suggest (see the durability guidelines here ) and would be a weak link in the mattress that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress. The Revere doesn't have a transition layer and uses a 1.65 lb polyfoam base layer which is a little better in terms of density and durability but it's also lower than the minimum density guidelines I would normally suggest for a mattress in this budget range.

There would be better quality/value memory foam mattresses available to you than either Loom & Leaf or Amerisleep and if you are looking at online memory foam options then the mattress shopping tutorial includes a link to a list of many of the better online memory foam options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) in a range of different designs, budgets, firmness levels, and with a range of different return/exchange policies that may be worth considering.

If you have tried many online mattresses and haven't been successful then it may also be worth considering a local mattress that you can test in person before a purchase.

If you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

Phoenix
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