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Searched for: Amerisleep
11 Jun 2017 19:21
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi anabelian,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Hopefully this is the right place to post this!


Yes, your post location is just fine. :cheer:

My husband and I are moving from Manhattan to New Jersey and need a bed on arrival. We're very willing to order online if the specs are right, but this site has made me rethink getting the Amerisleep Liberty.


I think that you may have already found this, but you can read more about Amerisleep and their sister companies and their so called "expert sites" that pose as being independent review sites in post #2 here and the posts it links to. A forum search on Amerisleep (you can just click the link) will bring up will bring up all the forum posts that mention them as well.

I’ll address some of your questions directly, but much of what you’re asking has to do with “what” to select, and I focus more on the “how” to select. Let me post some general information first on guidance for selecting a mattress.

The first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

Outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

As it seems that you may be in a bit of a time crunch with your impending move, you may wish to focus on the simplified manner of choosing the "best possible" mattress. This comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

BMI over 30


A higher BMI presents special challenges and generally requires firmer materials (in the support layers especially). This could be firmer latex or innersprings (the type of support component would be a personal preference and in the right design either could be suitable) or even a zoned construction. The same overall guidelines apply with higher weights though that PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) along with using high quality durable materials that will maintain their feel and performance for longer periods of time are the way to make the best choices. Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any types of mattress and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

Higher BMI ranges will need more durable materials and components in a mattress and in a BMI range of 30 or higher I would include any 1.8 lb polyfoam or 4 lb memory foam as a "lower quality/density" material (relative to a higher BMI only) and minimize their use to a total of "about an inch or so or less" in the mattress.

Polyurethane foam: If your mattress is one sided then I would look for 2.0 lb per cubic foot density or higher. If the mattress is two sided then I would use a minimum density of 1.8 lbs per cubic foot or higher.

Memory foam (or gel memory foam): If your mattress is one sided then I would make sure that any memory foam is at least 5 lb per cubic foot. If the mattress is two sided then I would use a minimum density of 4 lbs per cubic foot.

Side sleepers/occasional back sleepers who get hip pain/tingly arms


Shoulder and arm issues can come from many sources, such as a mattress that is too firm and puts direct pressure on the shoulders, the shoulder blades, or on the back muscles and can also cause soreness or numbness and tingling in the arms. It can often come from postural issues, or is sometimes unfortunately can be an issue associated with a higher BMI. Shoulder issues can also come from sleeping in the same position for a longer period of time than normal. If the mattress is too firm, then if you sleep on your side your shoulders may not sink in enough to relieve pressure and your upper body can "twist" away from the pressure so your upper body is "twisted" more forward while the lower body is still on its side. This spinal twisting or torsion can twist the spine in the upper body and lead to soreness in the area of the twist. There is some much more detailed information, including some sleeping postural tips, on shoulder and arm issues in posts #2 and #3 here .

I would also make sure that your pillow is the proper thickness to keep your neck in a more neutral alignment. Using a body pillow can be a good thing and resting your free arm upon that can be helpful. Placing a pillow behind you to slightly lean against can also take a bit of stress off of your shoulder joint area.

Like Heavenly Beds in the hotels. Won't buy another pillowtop due to sagging.


Most “hotel mattresses” tend to be firmer overall, with softer “top of bed” products. Having firmer deep support would make sense for someone with a higher BMI. Regarding pillowtops, they are a construction process and not a comfort designation. If you had a mattress sag and it was tailored as a pillowtop, this sagging was most likely due to the lower density foams used within the pillowtop panel, although some manufactures do a poor job of constructing their pillowtops as well.

Used to love Beautyrest 10 years ago. The recent ones don't feel nearly the same.


I wouldn’t focus much on the brand name, as you want to focus more upon the componentry inside of the product. Unfortunately, the major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (along with the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

Don't like when beds leave impressions for more than a few seconds. Fast bounce-back time is a must.


Latex will be the most resilient (best “bounce-back”) of the foams, followed by true high-resiliency polyfoam, and then high density polyfoam. If you end up selecting a product using memory foam, you’d want to specify something that was faster-responding and also something that was less temperature sensitive impacting the viscous nature of the foam.

Motion isolation and edge support are important.


Memory foam would be the best foam at deadening motion. Latex also is good at this, but not as good as memory foam. A combination of either with a pocketed coil spring unit can also do quite a good job at deadening motion (see post #18 here ). All the layers and components in a mattress will have some effect on the feel and performance of all the other layers and the mattress "as a whole" so the best way to test for motion isolation is your own careful testing on a mattress using the testing guidelines in the tutorial post (with both of you on the mattress) because a mattress that may be "motion isolating enough" for one couple may not be as suitable for another couple that is more sensitive. The bed frame/platform base you use will also impact motion transfer. The more solid the base unit, the less motion transfer that will be felt.

Prefer materials that don't off-gas. Organic a plus but not a necessity.


Polyfoam, memory foam and latex will all off gas something, and being organic certified doesn’t speak to that. Most people concerned with “organic” materials are usually concerned more with "safety" than whether the materials have an actual organic certification and they usually aren't aware that an organic certification isn't the same thing as a safety certification. There is more information about the three different levels of organic certifications in post #2 here and some of the benefits of an organic certification in post #3 here and there is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications such as Oeko-tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, C2C, and CertiPUR-US in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are also some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.


If you are going to shop locally, you can do a forum search for the city you’re moving to in New Jersey (or the closest major city) and see if there is a listing on the site of some retailers you may wish to visit. Also, among the site members closest to you that you may wish to visit would be Dixie Foam Beds and Scott Jordan Furniture in NYC, and the Shovlin Mattress Factory in Fanwood, NJ and Urban Natural Home Furnishings in Paramus, NJ.

If you are considering looking online, a good place for you to start could be to use the experience and expertise of the members listed in post #21 here who are all very experienced and knowledgeable and specialize in providing the type of help and guidance on the phone that can help you make good choices for a higher BMI. There are a wide range of latex and memory foam options included in the choices and I think highly of the advice that these companies provide.

Hopefully this helps point you in a proper direction.

Phoenix
11 Jun 2017 13:53
  • anabelian
  • anabelian's Avatar
Hopefully this is the right place to post this! My husband and I are moving from Manhattan to New Jersey and need a bed on arrival. We're very willing to order online if the specs are right, but this site has made me rethink getting the Amerisleep Liberty.

Here are our specs:
* Budget for king bed is less than $2500, preferably less than $2000 (mattress only)
* BMI over 30
* Side sleepers/occasional back sleepers who get hip pain/tingly arms
* Had a Bed-in-the-Box Natural Silk Elegance Gel Mattress (king), and it had deep valleys in less than a year. We didn't even bother with the warranty. It was comfortable at first, if hard to move around in.
* Like Heavenly Beds in the hotels. Won't buy another pillowtop due to sagging.
* Used to love Beautyrest 10 years ago. The recent ones don't feel nearly the same.
* Open to combination of materials (pocketed coils, memory foam, latex all ok). Solid latex has been our least favorite in stores though.
* Don't like when beds leave impressions for more than a few seconds. Fast bounce-back time is a must.
* Motion isolation and edge support are important.
* Prefer materials that don't off-gas. Organic a plus but not a necessity.

Does anything jump out? I've read all the research but can't figuring out if a mattress has enough foam density to support our weights while still being soft enough for side sleeping.
01 Jun 2017 14:23
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Ari,

No worries - thank you.

Phoenix
01 Jun 2017 07:57
  • Ari
  • Ari's Avatar
Hi Phoenix
Sorry i posted this then saw other posts on it and realized it is not right for me. So you can disregard this :)
01 Jun 2017 05:49
  • Ari
  • Ari's Avatar
How do these amerisleep specs look for higher Bmi's? I need good support but also pressure point relief. The bottom layers are less then the typical 1.8lbs but the ilds seem higher then the norm


Liberty - 12inches / 3 layers
Top Layer (BioPur) - 3" / 4lb-density / 10 ILD
Middle Layer (Affinity) - 2" / 1.5lb-density / 22 ILD
Bottom Layer (BioCore) - 7" / 1.5lb-density / 35 ILD


Revere - 12 inches
Top Layer - 3 inches / 4lb-density / 10ILD
Bottom Layer - 9 inches / 1.65lb-density / 40ILD
31 May 2017 11:24
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi zab,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I’m happy to assist you and provide some advice. While I can’t help with “what” to choose, I certainly can assist with the “how” part of things.

The first thing I would recommend is to "reset" how you are looking at mattresses and immediately stop relying upon reviews. While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ), and should not be used as any sort of a reliable indicator about the quality or appropriateness of a mattress for your specific needs.

The first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, durability and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

As part of your mattress research, I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase. If you can't find out this information, I would consider that a risky purchase and would recommend looking elsewhere.

as a graduate student, my budget is extremely limited: $900 tops, ~$600 preferable.


For those that have a more restricted budget then post #4 here and the posts it links to also include many of the better lower budget online options I'm aware of as well. Some of these companies are members here of the site (listed in post #21 here ) who are all very experienced and knowledgeable and specialize in providing the type of help and guidance on the phone that can help you make good choices. There are a wide range of options included in the choices there (some quite affordable) and I believe that all of them compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, and transparency.

Posts #1 and #2 in this topic also includes more information about the new "breed' of "simplified choice" mattresses (aka "one choice fits all" or "universal comfort" or "bed in a box" or "disruptor" or "millennial" mattresses) that are available online as well that are typically in a budget range of between $600 and $1000 (queen size).

I'm overweight (about 250 pounds), though I plan on losing weight in the next year.


Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any types of mattress and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

I live in Austin, TX


Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ... some of the better options or possibilities I’m aware of in and around San Antonio and Austin is in post #2 here .

In my limited experience, I don't get good sleep on spring mattresses, because I can feel pressure points from the springs.


I don’t doubt that this is the case if your limited experience has been with less expensive innerspring mattresses using little and lower quality foams.

But I also don't really like that memory foam "feel" - very firm, locks you in place, not easy to roll around, etc. I think this is why I tend to prefer medium-firm memory foam mattresses. I usually sleep on my side.


All memory foam will tend to be more difficult to reposition when sleeping, and one that is more “medium-firm” would be a memory foam mattress with less overall memory foam in the comfort layers, as all memory foam is quite plush and not very resilient.

So, then I started looking at online distributors (Amerisleep, Leesa, Nectar, Tuft & Needle, etc.).


The Nectar uses a 1” of 4 lb gel memory foam, a 3-inch 3.5 lb memory foam with a medical grade cooling and finally a 2.2 lb polyfoam core. They don’t list the thickness of the polyfoam core, or the thickness of the quilted gel memory foam panel or the density of that material. The polyfoam core uses a good density foam, but I would use some caution with the 3” of 3.5 lb. memory foam on top of the core, as that is a bit lower than I would normally recommend. They are a product assembled in the USA of components sourced from China and the US. They do not specific what is from where. I would caution against purchasing this item before knowing the complete specifications and component origins. I can't speak to what you're referencing with the "false marketing" comment.

I would be more cautious with Amerisleep , as they tend to use some lower quality materials than what I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines. Amerisleep, along with Astrabeds and Simplyrest , is part of onemallgroup , which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito .

You can use the search feature of the forum to pull up more information about the brands you listed, or you can read through the simplified choice thread here for a consolidated place of information about many of the one-size-fits-all mattresses, including the Leesa and Tuft and Needle.

As a result, I'm left with the feeling that I'm pretty much screwed no matter what I do.


Not at all, unless you give up researching and use reviews as your guidance. And as you are PhD candidate, I’m guessing doing a bit of reading and learning is right up your alley. ;) You shouldn’t have a problem finding something using better density foams that will last you the shorter time frame you need.

Phoenix
30 May 2017 18:29
  • zab
  • zab's Avatar
Austin, Texas PhD student here.

I've been using the same type of extremely cheap mattress from Amazon for about the last 6-7 years. Since it's so cheap, each time I'd move, I'd just scrap it and buy a new one, never using the same exact mattress for more than about 1.5-2 years. However, after sleeping on the same mattress for about 3-4 years now (and gaining some weight), I've realized that I desperately need a new mattress.

Background info. First, as a graduate student, my budget is extremely limited: $900 tops, ~$600 preferable. Second, I'm overweight (about 250 pounds), though I plan on losing weight in the next year. Third, I live in Austin, TX. Finally, I'm not sure how long I'll be using the mattress. I'll be living in Austin for another 4 years tops. After that, I have no idea where I'll be going and whether I'll be taking my mattress with me.

Mattress preference info. In my limited experience, I don't get good sleep on spring mattresses, because I can feel pressure points from the springs. But I also don't really like that memory foam "feel" - very firm, locks you in place, not easy to roll around, etc. I think this is why I tend to prefer medium-firm memory foam mattresses. I usually sleep on my side.

Here's where I'm at.

It didn't take long to realize that chain mattress stores like Mattress Firm are shady and offer low quality products.

So, then I started looking at online distributors (Amerisleep, Leesa, Nectar, Tuft & Needle, etc.). I quickly ruled out the Nectar (made in China, shipping issues, false marketing, etc.). And while the other options get consistently "good reviews," after doing some research, the consensus seems to be that most of the reviews are not reliable (they're either biased or based on trying a mattress for a few days). Moreover, the density levels seem to be lacking - which could affect the durability over time (especially given that I'm overweight).

But now what? The only other option is to check out local mattress stores. But I worry that these options will be on the high end of my price range (if they don't considerably exceed it!). For example, I tried Denver Mattress, but the only mattress in my price range that I liked is the Madison Plush, which is not highly reviewed on their site.

As a result, I'm left with the feeling that I'm pretty much screwed no matter what I do. I'm somewhat tempted to just take a chance on the Leesa or the Amerisleep. Based on user reviews, the Leesa seems to fit my preferences (see above), while I haven't been able to find much info on the Amerisleep (plus it's considerably more expensive).

But maybe I'm missing something. What would you guys recommend to someone in my unique situation?
07 Mar 2017 12:32
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi christeawortham,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Looking for something soft-medium (about a 4-5 on firmness).

Unfortunately, there are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ), so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all just to point out the difficulty in categorizing mattresses by softness ratings, and further emphasizes that your personal opinion when testing a model is the overall most important indicator of what is or is not soft-medium.

So far I've narrowed it down to helix and Brooklyn bedding. Seems like the helix is a better bed all together...better materials, more expensive etc.

Both the Brooklyn Bedding Best Mattress Ever (BME) and the Helix mattress use high quality and durable materials. The BME is available in three different firmnesses, using latex for the comfort layers and 2 lb polyfoam for the base core. The Helix uses a questionnaire and algorithm to come up with a configuration that they feel will best suit your BMI and sleeping style. Their comfort layers are combinations of poly foam (1.8 lb minimum) and a microcoil unit on top of a 1.8 lb polyfoam core. I wouldn’t call the materials in one mattress as “better” than the other (the BME does use a higher density polyfoam core), but instead I would refer to them as choosing different components, but still high quality. And price is not an indicator of the quality of any mattress and I wouldn’t recommend using that to judge durability or quality of componentry. But it is certainly an important part of anyone’s personal value equation .

But my concern is the mattress appears flat (no contours or grooves) vs. the brooklyn bedding which looks more quilted with deep grooves (basically looks like it can hug more which is what I want).

Both mattresses can be had in configurations that will contour quite well to your body and be very point elastic. The BME uses a thin quilt panel, where the Helix is a smooth top, and both can contour very well for sleeping in any position.

Which is better for me?

While I can certainly help with "how" to choose, it's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I’d suggest that you start by reading the mattress shopping tutorial here , and two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

The next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

When you can't test a mattress in person (like the BME and Helix you are considering), then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

In its simplest form ... choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight/BMI range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

I'm also open to other brands: ghostbed, zotto, amerisleep or anything else

You can use the search feature of the forum to pull up more information about the brands you listed (I’d advise caution with the Amerisleep brand), or you can read through the simplified choice thread here for a consolidated place of information about many of the one-size-fits-all mattresses.

Phoenix
07 Mar 2017 08:25
  • christeawortham
  • christeawortham's Avatar
hey!

Looking for something soft-medium (about a 4-5 on firmness).

So far I've narrowed it down to helix and Brooklyn bedding. Seems like the helix is a better bed all together...better materials, more expensive etc. But my concern is the mattress appears flat (no contours or grooves) vs. the brooklyn bedding which looks more quilted with deep grooves (basically looks like it can hug more which is what I want).

Which is better for me?

I'm also open to other brands: ghostbed, zotto, amerisleep or anything else
I've eliminated tuft needle as it seems more firm and purple (heard the polymer takes adjusting)
25 Feb 2017 10:12
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jasonfodor,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

The problem I don't even know what to ask when purchasing a mattress. I've read the difference between Latex, Memory foam, etc. but I don't know which is right for me.
I live in a small town so I don't have many options, I am looking strictly for one of these bed in a box companies that offers free trials.

Your situation is a common one, so I’ll do my best to lead you through the steps to help you make an educated choice.

First, start by reading the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones. Don’t try to memorize things, but instead read this like a good book and reference back to it with specific questions you might have.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP, and can also help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for, and then post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation .

Outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it. I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

As you’re interested in one of the “one-size-fits-all” products, take a look at the simplified choice mattress thread here , which lists quite a bit of information about some of the more popular mattresses in this category, and it also has some good information about how to select something in this category.

About the only thing I can answer is firmness, and I can't even really answer that. I used a really soft mattress topper and I'm a side sleeper which would indicate soft. But, I use to be a back sleeper and want to get back into that (heard it's better for you), so I am guessing a medium firmness. 5'10'' 175 lbs athletic/muscular built.

When you can't test a mattress in person, then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc.) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences or to other mattresses that they are familiar with than anyone else.

A good online retailer or manufacturer will generally make suggestions that they honestly believe have the best chance of success based on the information you provide them when you talk to them on the phone because this is in both your own and their best interests, but again at the end of the day the only way to know for certain whether any specific mattress is a good match for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP will be based on your own careful testing and/or your own personal experience so if you can't test a specific mattress in person then the options you have available after a purchase to either exchange the mattress or individual layers or components or return the mattress for a refund (and any costs involved) would generally become a more important part of your personal value equation just in case a mattress you purchase doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for.

Of course if an online retailer or manufacturer only sells one mattress then that's the only one they can suggest (although some may have different firmness levels that they can help you choose between) so they will generally suggest trying it and then sending it back if it's not "good enough" for you to keep (assuming that they have a good trial period and return policy).

Seems like all brands I've looked at are very comparable (4-4.5 stars): tuft needle, amerisleep, nest, ghostbed, purple, helix sleep, zotto, layla sleep.

While I can't speak to whether any of them would be a good "match" for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP ... Nest Bedding (A site member here, which means that I think highly of them), Tuft & Needle, Ghostbed, Purple, Helix Sleep, Zotto all sell mattresses that use good quality and durable materials that would generally be suitable for your weight/BMI range.

I would be more cautious with Layla Sleep and Amerisleep because they both tend to use some lower quality materials than I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines, and are not sing materials as durable as the other items you mentioned. You can use the search feature of the forum to pull up more information about these brands.

Regarding “star ratings”, while most reviewers are certainly well meaning, but because most reviews aren't relevant to anyone but the reviewer and can be "influenced" so easily and in so many ways, for the most part (with only few exceptions) mattress reviews are a classic example of garbage in / garbage out even though the "garbage" may be well meaning and true to the experience of the person writing the review. These are generally short-term comments rendered by people unqualified to provide an educated analysis of the componentry within a product, and I wouldn’t regard them as a reliable method of picking out any mattress.

A big part of the underlying problem with these types of “star” marketing systems though is that consumers as a whole put too much trust in mattress reviews in the first place (either positive or negative) in the mistaken belief that they are a good way to assess whether a mattress would be a suitable or a durable choice for them so they end up choosing a mattress for all the wrong reasons based on other people's experiences and reviews or on the "deal" they think they are getting instead of legitimate "fact based" research that would be relevant to their own unique needs, preferences, and criteria. Many mattress companies are well aware of their ability to influence people and change buying habits and certainly take full advantage of the mindset and target market that pays significant attention to them so they are really just taking advantage of a "reality" that they know will sell mattresses for them. You’ll be better off sticking to the steps as outlined in the mattress shopping tutorial I linked to earlier.

I hope that information helps get you started.

Phoenix
24 Feb 2017 18:15
  • jasonfodor
  • jasonfodor's Avatar
The problem I don't even know what to ask when purchasing a mattress. I've read the difference between Latex, Memory foam, etc. but I don't know which is right for me.

I live in a small town so I don't have many options, I am looking strictly for one of these bed in a box companies that offers free trials.

I had a good $800 mattress in high school, then a piece of plywood in a dorm (lol), then a cheap $300 bed till graduation. So at this point, I shouldn't be hard to please.

About the only thing I can answer is firmness, and I can't even really answer that. I used a really soft mattress topper and I'm a side sleeper which would indicate soft. But, I use to be a back sleeper and want to get back into that (heard it's better for you), so I am guessing a medium firmness. 5'10'' 175 lbs athletic/muscular built.

I'm not even sure what other factors I should consider.

Seems like all brands I've looked at are very comparable (4-4.5 stars): tuft needle, amerisleep, nest, ghostbed, purple, helix sleep, zotto, layla sleep.
21 Feb 2017 10:06
  • GiantsFan2029
  • GiantsFan2029's Avatar
Thanks Phoenix! Ill ride out the Amerisleep test drive for a while to see how it fairs.
20 Feb 2017 14:50
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi GiantsFan2029,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Seems like there are a ton of options out there, but not a lot of reviews on bases. Amerisleep seemed confident that their bed could go on any adjustable base. That being said, does anyone have any input on this topic.

There is more information about choosing an adjustable bed in post #3 here and the main adjustable bed topic that it links to that can help you choose an adjustable bed based on price vs features comparisons and also includes some retailers that you can use as good sources of information about the features of the adjustable beds they carry and as pricing references as well (in post #6 in the main adjustable bed topic). Of course there are many other sources as well and prices can change on a regular basis so I would also include some internet searching in your research. I would also keep in mind that online advertised prices are often price controlled so make sure you call the stores you are considering to find out their best prices rather than just looking at websites. Here is another adjustable bed base thread with some manufacturers listed.

I would consider all the major adjustable bed manufacturers to be closely comparable in terms of reliability, so I would use price and feature comparisons to choose between them. I would also give some careful consideration to the type of features that you may find useful over a longer period of time because some of the features they offer may seem very "enticing" when you are shopping but some people may find that they don't use them as much as they thought they would once the novelty has worn off.

We ended up going with Amirsleep Revere.

While I’m happy you found a new mattress :cheer: , I would be more cautious with Amerisleep , as they tend to use some lower quality materials than what I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines . Hopefully you were able to learn the density of all of the foam layers within your mattress before making your purchase. Amerisleep, along with Astrabeds and Simplyrest , is part of onemallgroup , which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito . The good news is that you did make a smart decision to purchase a mattress that does allow for a return should it not turn out as well as you had hoped for.

I hope the adjustable bed base information helps you on your search, and you should have no issues with your new mattress bending with any power foundation.

Phoenix
20 Feb 2017 13:37
  • GiantsFan2029
  • GiantsFan2029's Avatar
First - Thanks TMU site for all the info in helpin me select my new bed!! We ended up going with Amirsleep Revere. In the end I got bogged down with ALLLLLLL the info out there and decided to leverage the 100-120 day test drives. Sooooo...assuming that we do stick with Memory Foam, we want to piece together an adjustable base. The reason we didnt go with ameribeds base is because they dont sell a 1 piece CA King...only split king and we just werent willing to compromise on bed size. Seems like there are a ton of options out there, but not a lot of reviews on bases. Amerisleep seemed confident that their bed could go on any adjustable base. That being said, does anyone have any input on this topic.
03 Jan 2017 16:57
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi redliondog,

Thank you for the update!

I’m very happy that you are sleeping well, and I’m glad that you were able to “fine tune” your mattress with a topper to get the feel that you desired. I’m also happy to see that Amerisleep took care of the refund on your old mattress for you.

While it was somewhat of a risk to buy a mattress from such a new company, it worked out good in the end. Except the pillows, everything was manufactured by Brooklyn Bedding (pillows from Latex International).

While the Ommage company is realtively new, the foam manufacturer (Talalay Global for the pillows and the foam in your mattress) is an established company and they’ve been producing Talalay latex for many years. And as you know, Brooklyn Bedding is a member here and they are an excellent fabricator.

I’m looking forward to your comments on your mattress “down the road”.

Phoenix
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