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Searched for: octaspring
14 Apr 2022 00:55
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi JMD5.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)

. My husband and I desperately need a new mattress, but I'm feeling very overwhelmed by all the options and information.

I can certainly understand the sense of overwhelm with thousands of options and conflicting information. You are not alone and you came to the right place to get some help sorting through this information.

. We are currently on a King Dormeo mattress, and it feels like we are both sleeping in a ditch. It is only about 5 years old. We both have neck and shoulder pain. I frequently wake up to roll over/move in the night, due to pain or pressure (I believe from misalignment).

Sorry to hear that your current Dormeo mattress causes you and your husband pains during the night. Dormeo is an all-foam mattress that contains a 5” soy-infused EcoCell polyfoam support layer with the 1” memory foam layer and a layer or two of 2" "Octasprings -EcoSprings" of unknown density. Even though it’s after the fact you may want to have a look at this red flag deals post here to understand what can go wrong with a mattress purchase that is missing factual data. Regardless of the marketing tactics used to promote a mattress, if verifiable specifics are not available, and the company that sells it is not willing to provide this information., I would assume that the mattress has lower-quality materials that will break down prematurely. An uninformed and trusting consumer can easily fall prey and end up with a mattress that has durability issues showing up much before the end of the warranty. Regardless of the mattress online “reviews” (galore)...outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new

To make a more informed mattress purchase I’d first determine which type of mattress you and your husband like (hybrid, All latex, Foam combos etc.) I’d make some trips to a local store that is willing to provide mattress-specific information and I’d try different styles and mattress types. Then I’d eliminate all the contenders for which you cannot find the mattress specifications you need to know so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the mattress durability guidelines here Doing this is a sure way to narrow down your options, help you zoom in on a quality product, and reduce the overwhelming amount of information you come across.

I'm thinking a hybrid, possibly with latex? But it also seems that we should stay away from springs since we are heavier people?

Not necessarily! .... “Spring” mattresses can be very durable and appropriate for higher weight range sleepers, provided that you like their feel. When selecting a product make sure to look at the mattress durability specifications recommended for someone with a 30+ BMI. A high BMI presents special challenges and generally requires firmer materials (in the support layers especially). This could be firmer latex or innersprings (the type of support component would be a personal preference and in the right design either could be suitable) or even a zoned construction. The same overall guidelines apply with higher weights though that PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) along with using high-quality durable materials that will maintain their feel and performance for longer periods of time are the way to make the best choices. Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any type of mattress and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

If you like latex, then an all-latex mattress or latex comfort layers over either an innerspring or polyfoam can make good sense. Latex is the most durable material from all types of foams and the upper layers of a mattress are the most important part of durability because they are the most subject to repeated compression and mechanical stress and for most people (but not all) ... they contribute more to the overall "feel" of the mattress as well.

Any recommendations for mattresses we should be looking at/considering? We are located in Alberta, Canada.

I don’t keep track of all the local stores in specific areas of Canada as the industry landscape is rapidly changing, but if you are considering an online purchase you can find a few Canadian manufacturers or retailers in the Trusted Members ~ directory that I think highly of and would be happy to assist and educate consumers.
CBH Wood
Dormio.ca
Memory Foam Comfort

I hope the above info and links help simplify your mattress search and set you on the right track
Phoenix
11 Jun 2018 20:30
  • Luma Sleep
  • Luma Sleep's Avatar
Hello Alleygray,

Thank for reaching out to The Mattress Underground. The Dormeo Octaspring mattress system is very unique and proprietary, making it difficult to impossible to get detailed information on the components. You seem to have made excellent progress in getting as much information as you have. Dormeo has been selling in the US and Canada since about 2010, with mixed reviews. People seem to either love it or hate it. We have not been able to find any info/data on the long-term durability of the springs. There is additional information on Dormeo in TMU such as: www.themattressunderground.com/mattress-forum/index/21115-dormeo-quality-going-forward.html, and
www.themattressunderground.com/mattress-forum/index/16315-another-newbie.html?start=10#42717. All we did was search Dormeo on TMU to take advantage of the TMU archives.

The Silk and Snow product appears to be a "solid" bed-in-a-box memory foam mattress. It's going to be very different than the Dormeo 6800 as its layers are dense vs. the airiness of Dormeo's Octosprings. A large part of the price difference with SnS being sold online vs. Dormeo in retail stores.
Your stated back health concerns make the matter of proper spinal alignment a primary consideration. We suggest this be the primary factor in your decision making between these 2 mattresses. We do not have relevant information to provide a factual recommendation. Intuitively, Dormeo's Octosprings would seem to better adapt and align your spine while sleeping on your side.

Hope this helps!

Team Luma
11 Jan 2018 12:26
  • MaryD
  • MaryD's Avatar
The breakdown of DORMEO is as follows:

1" PCM Infused Cool ACTIV HD Memory Foam (5 lb) Comfort Layer
OCTASPRING ™ Technology Support System:

Top Layer:
2 Layers of 2" Firm EcoSprings™ sandwiched with .5"
Ecocell™ Support Layers top and bottom Base Layer
5" Ecocell (2.0 lb) Support Core

I am also looking at a Natura latex mattress for roughly the same price:

Cotton and wool blend ticking
4.2 lbs of pure NaturaWool™
1” all-natural Dunlop latex quilted to the cover
1” soft Talalay natural latex top layer
2” medium Talalay natural latex
6” medium-firm Talalay natural latex support core

Please help compare!
Thanks!
22 Sep 2017 15:10
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi hima,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I'm new to the forum and I appreciate the wealth of information posted here! It's not very often you shop for a mattress, but it's my turn and there is a lot to learn!


I’m glad that you’ve found us!

We went to Sleep Country (prior to visiting this site) and tried on a bunch of different models. We are mainly side and back sleepers. We prefer medium-firm on the firmer side. We came across the Dormeo 6711 which to us is soft enough so that there's no pressure on the shoulders and firm enough so that we don't sink in too much. I also like the fact that it responses faster. In some tempur-pedic models, the slow response of the mattress feels very "weird" to me.

However, when I was trying to do more research about the Dormeo 6711, there's not much online. Even on this forum, the last update by Pheonix was around 2015. The 6711 model is also new this year (I think).

I contacted Dormeo North America to ask for the foam densities, but they haven't gotten back to me yet. There's no live person to talk to, only voicemail. If they call back with some information, I'll definitely share it here.


There is also more information about the Dormeo Octaspring mattresses in post #2 here that may be helpful but I would make sure you can confirm the thickness and density of all the layers in the mattress (see this article ) before considering it.

There are a few comments about the older Octaspring 9500 in post #2 here (you may have already seen this one) that you may find interesting but I don't know the specifics of the current line so In hope that Dormeo contacts you because it's unlikely that Sleep Country will provide you with the information you need to make an informed choice. It's also possible that Dormeo may not provide it either.

As for suggestions, I can certainly help with "how" to choose, but it's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

Outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

If you can find out the thickness and density of all the layers and components in the 6711 and post them on the forum I'd be happy let you know if there are any lower quality materials or weak links that would be a reason for concern.

We like the idea of natural and organic.


Most people that are looking for an "organic" mattress or materials are usually concerned more with "safety" than whether the materials have an actual organic certification and they usually aren't aware that an organic certification isn't the same thing as a safety certification. There is more information about the three different levels of organic certifications in post #2 here and some of the benefits of an organic certification in post #3 here and there is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications such as Oeko-tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, C2C, and CertiPUR-US in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are also some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.

Natural latex also feels weird but seems like something we could get used to.


Latex (natural, synthetic or blended) will have a very buoyant feel and is quite resilient (returns much of the energy in rebound), and can have a very different feel from polyfoam and memory foam.

Otherwise, brands such as Essentia claiming to be all natural is out of our budget!


You may wish to perform a forum search on Essentia (you can just click on the link) for some of the information about “natural” memory foam claims. There are also many more affordable choices for an all-latex product, should you desire to choose that route, including many site members listed here .

Phoenix
22 Sep 2017 12:41
  • hima
  • hima's Avatar
Hello,

I'm new to the forum and I appreciate the wealth of information posted here! It's not very often you shop for a mattress, but it's my turn and there is a lot to learn!

We're looking for a memory foam type mattress with better support and long durability. We are from Vancouver BC Canada.

We went to Sleep Country (prior to visiting this site) and tried on a bunch of different models. We are mainly side and back sleepers. We prefer medium-firm on the firmer side. We came across the Dormeo 6711 which to us is soft enough so that there's no pressure on the shoulders and firm enough so that we don't sink in too much. I also like the fact that it responses faster. In some tempur-pedic models, the slow response of the mattress feels very "weird" to me.

However, when I was trying to do more research about the Dormeo 6711, there's not much online. Even on this forum, the last update by Pheonix was around 2015. The 6711 model is also new this year (I think).

I contacted Dormeo North America to ask for the foam densities, but they haven't gotten back to me yet. There's no live person to talk to, only voicemail. If they call back with some information, I'll definitely share it here.

We like the idea of natural and organic. Natural latex also feels weird but seems like something we could get used to. Otherwise, brands such as Essentia claiming to be all natural is out of our budget!

Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!
22 Sep 2017 12:24
  • Sweet Dreams
  • Sweet Dreams's Avatar
While I don't have any experience with the Dunlopillo Ambiance series I previously owned their Retreat series Eurotop which is their next series up the line. While the mattress was exceedingly comfortable in the store they are not very forthcoming in providing densities of the foams that they use in the various models. The combinations of foam types being used make them seem very appealing, but it didn't take long for the mattress to get soft and lack the support it had when new. The softening wasn't visible as depressions when not on the mattress so there was no warranty issue, just a lack of support due to the foams becoming overly soft. I am a high BMI at 6'4" and 270 lbs so I'm sure that was a factor, but if higher density foams were used I'm sure it would have held up better for a more reasonable period of time. Btw I did see some articles stating that MF has bought out Sherwood who is the US licensee for Dunlopillo, so if you do decide to purchase one there should be quite a bit of room to negotiate on their price!

In that same price range MF now offers their own Dream Bed Lux series which are made of very high density foams and incorporate foam Octasprings licensed by Dormeo. There are a few models with varying firmness levels, but they are generally a much firmer and more supportive all foam mattress compared to the much plusher Dunlopillo designs. You'd may want to try them out to find which you prefer, although you can also find much less expensive quality foam mattress designs from other companies like many of those that are members of this site.

Hope this helps!
18 Aug 2017 12:53
  • NotSleepingWell
  • NotSleepingWell's Avatar
Hi All:
So I began shopping for a mattress about 2 weeks ago, I started at SleepCountry and The Brick and negotiated some pretty good deals, but when I came home to research the specific mattresses, I came across this website (I'm new here), and well....I had to start from scratch knowing what I know now. This website has been pretty awesome with the wealth of information on materials and manufacturing of mattresses, buyer tutorials, and feedback/experiences from Phoenix and all the members. Thank you!

A bit of background on me: I'm in my early 30's, 5'11 and 215lbs. I'm fairly active, mostly weight training at the gym. I suffer from back problems due to a car accident I was in. I have a compression fracture in my lower back and have bulging disc as well. Occasionally my sciatic nerves act up so I have pains running down both my legs. My back is often sore and aching from prolonged sitting or standing or bending over. When it comes to sleep, I have a pretty crummy hard rock mattress right now. I've had it for several years and there doesnt seem to be any softening. I begin sleeping on my back, but rotate often, and usually find it most comfortable on my side or stomach. My chiropractor has advised that I don't sleep on my stomach because of the pressure it puts on my back, but I can't help it.

In trying out the plethora of mattress options, I found that memory foam to be of most comforting to me, specifically the Tempurpedic available at most big box stores, which is where I started my search. I have broad shoulders, so when I sink into the mattress I feel the weight being transferred from my body to the mattress which is comforting. I didn't feel comfortable with the stiffer/bouncier mattresses, especially on my upper body. Also, given that I sleep on my stomach and sides often, I don't want to wake up with a stiff neck and sore and aching upper back and shoulders, hence I think a memory foam would assist with this the best as it molds to my frame. I did notice that my waist did sink a bit too low in the memory foam, which made it a bit uncomfortable for me and I didn't feel much support in that area. Ideally, I'd like to find/make a mattress that allows me to sink in at my upper body so I can get used to sleeping on my back more often and also have a bit more support at my waist so that my back remains straight as its meant to be. So based on that, I think a 2 zoned mattress would serve my needs the best, unless someone thinks otherwise and can explain why. Any feedback would be appreciated.

As for what I searched and am interested in, I started at SleepCountry, I nearly purchased a Octaspring Dormeo 6700 mattress with 2 pillows, taxes and delivery for $1750. However, after coming across this website, I was unable to determined the specs of the mattress, specifically the densities of the foams. The only thing I could find is the information on their website and some mixed reviews. At The Brick I negotiated a deal for an even lesser price for a Sealy iComfort EFX30 mattress ($1300), but once again minimal information and worse reviews. After reading the step by step Buyer tutorial, I decided to forgo these two mattresses in search of something better. Let me know if you think that was a mistake and I should scoop up one of these mattresses. I looked up some of the manufacturers recommended by this website in the Greater Toronto Area. I went to go see 5 of them and here are my findings.

Foamite:
Great store with several mattresses to try out. Staff is very informative and knowledgeable. They manufacture their own foam from what I gather, rather than purchasing from other vendors. I was quoted $1329 for the following mattress for a custom built 2-zone queen mattress.
Top Layer - VG10 - Koosh VG - 2" 4LB (VG - VISCOELASTIC - SPACE AGE TECHNOLOGY FOR GREAT PRESSURE RELIEF)
Mid Layer - KN26C Medium - 1" 2.5LB (KN - KOOSH NATURAL (KN) - The best 2.5 lb and most natural high resiliency foam)
Bottom Layer - EC38 Firm - 5" 2LB (EC - ECOCELL - GOOD 2.0 lb. HIGH DENSITY SOY-BASED FOAM)
Here's a link for more detail on their website to the various foam grades their carry: www.foamite.com/foam-grades/
The sales rep did mention that for the top layer they would split it into 2 parts - the top and bottom areas (head and feet) would be a higher density memory foam for comfort, whereas the middle area (thigh/waist to mid back) would be a lower density so I wouldn't sink in too much and there would be more support, but the sales rep didn't provide specifics on the density.

DreamTime Bedding:
They manufacture their own mattresses and have several on display to try out and select from. Although they know what they're doing and manufacture in the same building, the sales rep didn't seem like she knew much or wanted to share/educate me much. In either event, I got a quote for a custom 2 zoned queen mattress $1100.
I'm not sure where they source their foam from, but I think it's from Carpenter Foams.
Top Layer: 3" of 5LB (Lower/Feet), 3LB (Mid/Waist) 5LB (Upper/Head) Memory Foam
Mid Layer: 3" 3LB Memory Foam
Bottom Layer: 6" Blue Foam, she didn't specify the density - although from speaking to other manufacturers, Blue Foam seems to be pretty good quality material.

SpringMade Mattresses
Seems like he's in the business of custom orders and repairs. Seemed relatively knowledgeable about mattresses and material, but not so much as to how it should benefit a person when they are sleeping. Gets his foam from Carpenter and was willing to make a custom 2 zoned mattress for me for $800.
Top Layer: 3" of 4LB (Lower/Feet), 5LB (Mid/Waist) 4LB (Upper/Head) GEL Memory Foam
Mid Layer: 1" 2LB 3414 Foam
Bottom Layer: 4" 2.5LB - 3024 Foam
He said that after the Bottom Layer, he would add another Mid and Top Layer (so that I could flip the mattress every 4-6 months to prolong the life of the mattress. So in total it would be 12" thick. So to simplify, it would be 3" (5LB), 1" (2LB), 4" (2.5LB), 1" (2LB) , 3" (5LB). Not sure if this makes sense, or is a good idea.

TON Furniture
Showroom is connected to DreamStar mattresses and in fact, they manufacture his mattresses. There are many on the showroom floor to try out and select from. He advised that a 2 zone mattress is not a good idea as the different foams are glued together. Over time he advised that the mattress may rip at the seams where the foams are glued together which would make the mattress useless. Not sure how true this is as no other manufacturer mentioned this. So I don't know whose being truthful. He advised that if you do get 2 zone mattresses, the mid layer should be 2 zoned, not the top or bottom layer as they will rip easier. He's very informative however, definitely knows a lot about mattresses and will inform the consumer. He high recommended a pre-made mattress which he currently sells for $999, queen size. It's called Reloks, here are the specs:
TOP:
Removable Deluxe Zippered Bamboo Cover
LAYER ONE:
2" Natural Mineral Foam
Copper Infused, All Natural Latex - Hypo-Allergenic.
All natural Talalay Latex - sourced from the rubber tree.
LAYER TWO:
2" Soy Transition Foam
A transitional foam layer allows a gradual exchange between the natural latex foam and the base to optimize comfort and support.
LAYER THREE:
6" High-Density Soy Foam Core
Made from high-density Soy Foam to keep you propped up and supported.
MATTRESS IS MADE IN TORONTO, CANADA

BB Bedding:
They know what they are doing. Good knowledge about mattresses, transparent in what they make and have to offer. Said he they would call me back on a custom order mattress but never did.

My thoughts are that Foamite and TON make quality mattresses, although Foamite is relatively more expensive and TON is resistant to making a custom mattress - and the Reloks mattress isn't a memory foam mattress so it's not my ideal choice. SpringMade offers the best price and a reversible mattress, but I don't know if the density, inches and overall design makes sense. As for DreamTime and BB Bedding, I think I will forgo them. So, here I am at last, typing out my last sentences in hopes that someone has some insight, experience or feedback on any of the mattresses, quality build, materials and manufacturer that can steer me in the right direction. My budget is about $1000, with some wiggle room. Your comments and suggestions are encouraged and welcomed. In the end, I'm looking to spend my money where I can get the best good nights rest.

Many Thanks!!

NotSleepingWell
13 Jul 2017 08:22
  • Roberto
  • Roberto's Avatar
I found these specs on their website. Does this mean anything to you?
It has the thickness but not the density. I'm on my way to Sleep Country right now to ask about the density. Thanks in advance! Roberto

OCTASPRING ™ Technology:

Top Layer:
3-zoned, Medium/Soft,
2" Memory Foam
MemoryCoils with .75" Ecocell Support Layer
Middle Layer:
5-zoned, Medium/Medium Soft/ Medium Firm,
2" Ecocell ™ EcoSprings TM with .75" Ecocell Support Layer and 4-sides foam encasing Base Layer
Bottom Layer:
5.25" Ecocell ™ Support Core
12 Jul 2017 16:31
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Roberto,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I discovered the Dormeo brand (model 6700; queen) and felt very comfortable on it. I was surprised that while I lay on it for a good 20 minutes I experienced a noticeable reduction in my chronic body pains. I went back the following day and lay on the same mattress for another 20 minutes and then returned again today and lay on it for almost half an hour. This particular mattress seems to agree with my body.


There is also more information about the Dormeo Octaspring mattresses in post #2 here that may be helpful but I would make sure you can confirm the thickness and density of all the layers in the mattress (see this article ) before considering it.

There are a few comments about the previous Octaspring 9500 in post #2 here which was somewhat similar but I don't know the specifics of the current line so you would need to call Dormeo because it's unlikely that Sleep Country will provide you with the information you need to make an informed choice. It's also possible that Dormeo may not provide it either.

If you can find out the thickness and density of all the layers and components in the 6700 and post them on the forum I'd be happy let you know if there are any lower quality materials or weak links that would be a reason for concern.

Just in case you haven't read it yet ... I would make sure that you've read the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

My primary concern is that I've read a few negative things online about it: three separate customers have complained that the top layer of foam had developed splits while the mattress was still quite new. This is very concerning to me; as much as I want to find a mattress that is supportive and comfortable and alleviates my chronic pains,


You’ll have to correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that the mattress ticking is permanent on the 6700, so how would consumers know if the foam in their mattress had tears? I could be wrong here, but I don’t see anything on the Dormeo site about the cover being removable.

Overall, I would be very cautious about using reviews (either positive or negative) as a reliable source of information about either the suitability or the durability of a mattress and in many cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a good choice for one person may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (see post #13 here ). Instead, focus upon finding out the information I referred to earlier about finding out the actual material and the density used inside of the mattress you’re considering.

I also want a mattress that will give me at least 12-15 years of solid, quality durability


If a mattress is well inside the comfort/support range that is suitable for someone and isn't close to the edge of the range that is too soft for them when it is new and it doesn't have any weak links in the design then it would be reasonable to expect a useful lifetime in the range of 7 - 10 years and with higher quality and more durable materials like latex or higher density memory foam or polyfoam (in the comfort layers especially) it would likely be in the higher end of the range or even longer. But it’s more realistic to think of about 10 years as a maximum reasonable expectation for any mattress no matter what the quality of the materials and then treat any additional time after that as "bonus time" because after about 10 years the limiting factor in the useful life of a mattress will often be the changing needs and preferences of the person sleeping on the mattress and even if a mattress is still in good condition after a decade ... a mattress that was suitable for someone 10 years earlier may not be the best "match" any longer.

The shop does offer a 100-day exchange or store credit, but I would hate to be stuck in a situation where I am not satisfied and can't find another mattress in the shop that satisfies me (and puts my fears of poor product construction/reliability at ease


I would be careful with purchasing and make sure that you are completely familiar with the exchange policy, as the offerings at Sleep Country are brands containing the level of quality of material I tend to advise to avoid, and if you perform an exchange you may be in a situation where your store credit forces you to choose from other lower quality options. The major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality and less durable materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (along with the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

I would greatly appreciate some advice and some information about the predicted reliability regarding build quality of this Dormeo brand as it ages.


Dormeo hasn’t been on the market for long enough for anyone to be able to really be able to make any meaningful comments about their durability based on actual experience. Outside of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) ... a mattress is only as good as it's construction and the quality/durability of the materials inside it regardless of the specific mattress or the name of the manufacturer that makes it and there are much more reliable ways to assess the quality/durability of a mattress or know whether it has any weak links in its design than using reviews (see this article and the quality/durability guidelines that it links to). There is also more about the many variables that can affect durability and the useful life of a mattress in post #4 here .

Phoenix
17 May 2017 10:24
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi lueswell,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I've just recently found out about the technology of molded pocket foams and it looks very interesting. Does anyone know about good mattresses manufacturers that use this kind of technology? Also, is there a standard name for this kind of mattress?


While it’s beyond my scope to keep up with all of the foams being put into production by various fabricators worldwide, the Reverie DreamCell would be the best known product here in North America. This technology is also used in a zoned area in their OSO Sleep mattress. A few others that immediately come to mind would be the Dormeo Octaspring (uses polyfoam or memory foam), Carpenter’s Qualatex/Avena foam coils, the small latex coils uses in the upholstery layers of the Kingsdown Back Smart and Vintage lines (and old Elliptica line introduced at market back in 2015), and Future Foam’s DNA (a plastic spring in a foam encasement).

Foam springs/coils (that is the common nomenclature) have been in production for quite some time in Europe (I’m not as familiar with the offerings there), but their higher cost keeps them from being as popular (see a sample here ) both here and there.

Phoenix
16 May 2017 19:31
  • lueswell
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Hello there!

I've just recently found out about the technology of molded pocket foams and it looks very interesting. I've been using a memory foam mattress for years now and I'll be moving to another country soon so I will have to purchase a new mattress. I am really intrigued about the molded pocket foams but only found references to two good brands that offer decent mattresses: Dormeo Octaspring and Reverie Dream Sleep. Does anyone know about good mattresses manufacturers that use this kind of technology? Also, is there a standard name for this kind of mattress? I've read mentions of molded pocket foam mattress, latex coils mattress, foam cylinders mattress and more, some of them within this board.
I am just having trouble finding suppliers for this kind of mattress. I've read quite a few topics about them but I can't find mentions of many brands.

Thank you for any information you might be able to provide,
Lues
13 Apr 2017 14:27
  • phoenix
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Hi MeanGene,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Was looking at Reverie. Are there any other manufacturers that use the foam spring concept like the Reverie DreamCell? For some reason, I believe in the course of web surfing, I came across another but can't find it again. A picture sticks in my mind in which the cells were surrounded by a black strapping around the middle.


The Reverie DreamCell would be the best known product. Their cells do have a recessed “band” around the center – perhaps that’s what you recall?

While it’s beyond my scope to keep up with all of the foams being put into production by various fabricators worldwide, a few others that immediately come to mind would be the Dormeo Octaspring (uses polyfoam or memory foam), Carpenter’s Qualatex/Avena foam coils, the small latex coils uses in the upholstery layers of the Kingsdown Back Smart and Vintage lines (and old Elliptica line introduced at market back in 2015), and Future Foam’s DNA (a plastic spring in a foam encasement). Foam springs/coils have been in production for quite some time in Europe, but their higher cost keeps them from being as popular (see a sample here ).

While not made of foam, another interesting product is a spring made of wood called Vitalwood .

Also, has anyone on the forum had any experience in purchasing a Reverie mattress without the adjustable base? They seem to push the "system", but I'm not sure we'd have much use tor an adjustable bed.


Manufacturers and retailers surely would like you to purchase an adjustable bed base along with their mattress (resulting in a higher purchase price), but if you feel that you would not use or benefit from a power foundation, there would be little reason to purchase one and the mattress would work just fine placed upon a firmer flat surface.

Phoenix
11 Feb 2017 21:02
  • phoenix
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Hi Jjuelzz,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Hi, I am 140lbs and a side sleeper. My GF is 130lbs, and also a side sleeper. We were in the market for a new mattress, and after doing some reviews, we decided to try out the Leesa. Upon sleeping on the Leesa in trying it for around 40 days, it just was not a bed for us. I think we were a little bit too light to take advantage of the Leesa. It seems as though like we did not sink down enough to take advantage of the support layers. The Leesa mattress was on a solid base.

I’m sorry your Leesa purchase didn’t work out as well as you had hoped, but at least you had the foresight to choose something that has a good return policy. All of the layers in a mattress work together, so when you say you think you were too light to sink in to take advantage of the support layers, I’m guessing you are referring to the upper comfort layers not providing enough contouring or pressure relief for your BMI.

Does anybody have any real world experience with mattresses and not just suggestions or reviews based off of review sites? Not looking to go cheap here but would like to stay around $2000 or less. I am also looking to stay away from the Serta, Simmons, Sealy, etc.

You certainly are on the right track to stay away from many of the major “S” brands that tend to use lower quality componentry, as well as ”review” sites, most of which are really “revenue” sites. I’d also caution you against putting too much stock into other people’s opinions on a product. Other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful. But I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words, other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

The best way for you to evaluate how certain componentry might perform in “real world” use would be to find out information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in any mattress you might consider that would detract from the useful life of a mattress.

While I can’t help with “what” to choose, I certainly can provide assistance with the “how”. The first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones. Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for, and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

I live in Winchester, Virginia

Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines here ...some options that are in reasonable driving distance would be the Washington, DC list here and the Richmond, VA list here and the Charlottesville/Lynchburg/Waynesboro, VA list here .

we have a Kingsdown and Dormeo manufacturing facility

I would be cautious with the Dormeo and Kingsdown mattresses and make sure that you find out all the information about all the layers in the mattress so you can compare them to the durability guidelines linked to previously. I would avoid any mattress where this information isn't easily available to you from the store that sells it. Their web sites doesn't contain any meaningful information that would be helpful to you because it's missing the density of the foam layers which is the information that you really need to know. There is a bit of information about the previous versions of the Dormeo Octaspring in post #2 here . Some of their previous mattresses have used some better quality materials in the past, but I would make a careful “value judgement” when purchasing an item like this.

He sells the Perfect Dreamer line of beds

There is no meaningful information at all on their website regarding foam quality or density, and I would avoid considering this or any brand like it until you could find out complete details of this product.

Hopefully that gives you a good start on your quest.

Phoenix
06 Nov 2016 18:37
  • phoenix
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Hi Icewing726,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Hi, first time poster. Stumbled across your mattress forum and decided to see what you all thought about this mattress since the reviews are non existent. The mattress in question is a Dormeo 15


I would be cautious with the Dormeo mattresses and make sure that you find out all the information in this article about all the layers in the mattress so you can compare them to the durability guidelines here to make sure that there are no lower quality/density materials or weak links that would compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress. I would avoid any mattress where this information isn't easily available to you from the store that sells it. Their spec sheet doesn't contain any meaningful information that would be helpful to you because it's missing the density of the foam layers which is the information that you really need to know.

There is a bit of information about the previous versions of the Dormeo Octaspring in post #2 here . Some of their previous mattresses have used some better quality materials in the past, but I would make a careful “value judgement” when purchasing an item like this.

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

Regarding reviews, while other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular store or business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress so I would be very cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

I’ll be interested to know if you find out further information about this mattress.

Phoenix
03 Sep 2016 18:52
  • phoenix
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Hi Rollins2016,

I was able to get the refund, even though it was quite a hassle.


That's good to hear.

I also got this info about the layers from Doremo
1.TOP LAYER: Phase Change Material on the top of a Supreme AirCool Memory Foam Comfort layer with gel and air pockets to give it more responsiveness and coolness than traditional memory foam.

2. MIDDLE LAYERS: Two Octaspring layers below the Comfort Layer
- the first layer is NOT foam encased because it needs to breathe to aide in temperature control
- the second Octaspring Layer is foam encased for added support

3. BOTTOM LAYER: Firm foam Support Core


As you probably know from the previous replies in the topic ... this doesn't contain any meaningful information that would be helpful to you because it's missing the thickness and density of the foam layers which is the information that you really need to know.

Ended up purchasing tonfurniture.com/omega-latex/


Hopefully you were able to find out all the information that you need to know to confirm that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the Omega mattress either but assuming that you did ... congratulations on your new mattress :)

Phoenix
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