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Searched for: Love Bed BestMattressEver
16 Nov 2017 18:46
  • AJohnson
  • AJohnson's Avatar

My husband and I are both 5'6", 160-170 lbs. My first pregnancy I topped out at about 210, and we're hoping for more kids down the line. You can definitely see on our mattress where I slept when pregnant - it's got a good 1.5" indentation. Would the Arctic Dreams provide enough support for someone of that weight sleeping on their side? On our Fåvang, I had huge issues with pressure points when pregnant, so I'm wondering if the Love & Sleep might provide more support if I have similar issues in the future.


I'm 185lbs and 6'1" (24.4 BMI), and am trying out an Arctic Dreams 10" right now. This has 2.5" of Energex as the comfort layer on top of a 6.5" core. I've personally found that my body heat softens the Energex too much, and my butt and back end up smashing it too flat and coming into noticeable contact with the harder core, to the point where it's slightly uncomfortable and I'm going to return it. and this is with back sleeping. if I were a side sleeper it'd probably be worse.

the thicker 12" Soft model of the Arctic Dreams instead has 3" of Energex, and an 8" core, which will give you more cushioning than the 10" Medium, but I still don't think that extra 0.5" of Energex would be enough. if you were a back sleeper, sure, but I still wouldn't risk it for a side sleeper near our BMI.

the Love and Sleep uses the same Energex, but has the thicker 3" layer, and more importantly, has a 1" layer of 2.0lb convoluted polyfoam between the top Energex and the base core, which should ease the transition between the Energex and core better than the Arctic Sleep. this looks like it'd be a much better option if you want Energex and are concerned about pressure points.

when you said you disliked latex, did you dislike the bounciness of it, or the firmness? if it was the latter, there are blends that are softer, and conform more to your body.

have you considered Ghostbed? it uses a 1.5" latex layer on top of a 2" memory foam layer. the layer of latex between you and the memory foam can buffer a good amount of that memfoam quicksand huggy feeling (while having a positive side-effect of making it sleep cooler), while the memory foam underneath the latex will blunt a lot of the bounciness. I'm guessing at all of this though, Phoenix would have to weigh in to be sure.

Brooklyn Bedding's #BestMattressEver might also be a good option, but I've read a lot of reviews saying that the medium firmness was significantly firmer than expected, and that the Titanflex foam takes a much longer time to break in compared to other foams (like, months) so give it a good long trial to make sure it doesn't just need more time to soften up before returning it if you end up trying it and not liking it. If you're a side sleeper, I might consider their Soft model over the Medium, although I have no personal experience with this mattress, so I can't say for sure.
17 Apr 2017 17:44
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi drog,

Welcome back!

I purchased an Ultimate Dreams mattress. It did not offer nearly enough support, stretching my back in really bad ways and it was very uncomfortable in the shoulders.


I’m sorry your Ultimate Dreams didn’t work out for you. If I remember correctly, you chose the Ultra Dreams Latex (3” of Talalay on top of polyfoam core with the tight quilt on top). I remember you stated you thought that you over-analyzed and went too soft (28 ILD versus 32 ILD), which may have been the case for someone with a higher BMI, or just your particular preference.

I ended up flipping the mattress over, and while certainly not comfortable it did not cause any pain that way


This would tend to lend support to your supposition that you chose too soft for your upper comfort layers.

Fast forward a few years and I've had issues with sciatica (couldn't get out of bed for a month) and a few months later had to have back surgery to relieve another pinched nerve (took a few months to recover).


I also recall you had started taking Humira, so I’m sorry to learn that you’ve continued to have some issues with inflammation and your back. I know that can be frustrating and make mattress shopping even more difficult.

I love the firm yet soft feel of memory foam but hate feeling stuck. With that in mind I think I would love some sort of a memory foam hybrid bed but I have not found anything suitable for someone my size in the price range I can afford. The most important factors in a bed for me is to minimize pressure points and have a healthy sleep environment for the nerves in my back.


While you may love sinking into your mattress, your experience seems to be showing that you respond better to a bit of firmer surface support. There is more about primary or "deep" support and secondary or "surface" support and their relationship to firmness and pressure relief and the "roles" of different layers in a mattress in post #2 here and in post #4 here that may also be helpful in clarifying the difference between "support" and "pressure relief" and "feel" although this may be more than you really need to know to choose a mattress that is a good "match" for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences).

Two of the more important links in the mattress shopping tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to buy a suitable mattress that is the best "match" in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for that are involved in each of them and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability, durability, and value.

Of course the ideal would be to have both suitable support/alignment and comfort/pressure relief in a mattress, but if you have to choose one over the other then I would choose support/alignment. There is some great information in this PHD thesis by Vincent+Verhaer (who is one of a group of researchers that I greatly respect) about the importance of good spinal alignment that clearly indicates that for healthy individuals it has the single biggest effect on the depth and quality of sleep and recovery for healthy individuals. Having proper alignment doesn’t necessarily mean that a mattress needs to feel hard like a board, and in your situation you certainly would want some surface comfort along with this deep support.

As you’re in a higher BMI range, the key will be finding componentry that will be of appropriate quality for your specific situation, which will then give you the best chance at have a successful comfort life, so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components. Those in a higher BMI range want to be especially prudent in the choice of their components. For those in a higher BMI range, there is more information about selecting a mattress in the durability guidelines here . Specifically, if your BMI is 30 or higher:

Higher BMI ranges will need more durable materials and components in a mattress and in a BMI range of 30 or higher I would include any 1.8 lb polyfoam or 4 lb memory foam as a "lower quality/density" material (relative to a higher BMI only) and minimize their use to a total of "about an inch or so or less" in the mattress.

Polyurethane foam: If your mattress is one sided then I would look for 2.0 lb per cubic foot density or higher. If the mattress is two sided then I would use a minimum density of 1.8 lbs per cubic foot or higher.

Memory foam (or gel memory foam): If your mattress is one sided then I would make sure that any memory foam is at least 5 lb per cubic foot. If the mattress is two sided then I would use a minimum density of 4 lbs per cubic foot.

There is no one firmness level that is "best for backs" in general because it would depend on the body type, sleeping style, and individual preferences of the person.

I recently spoke with someone at Dreamfoam Bedding who recommended their Eurotop bed with a level 3 firmness for me after discussing my issues I'm having with my bed, but I'm having a hard time convincing myself to go with this company again due to my disappointment with my current bed.


If you’re referring to the Ultimate Dreams Eurotop, then this would have a similar configuration to your current mattress, but it would use higher density foam (2 lb versus 1.8 lb) for the polyfoam core. The firmness of the upper latex layer they’re recommending is more along the lines of what was originally suggested to you (3.5 in the Ultimate Dreams, where you ended up selecting the softer 6.5 instead). I don’t know that this mattress is enough of a difference based upon your results of sleeping better upon the mattress flipped over with the polyfoam core.

And I wouldn’t necessarily base your opinion of an entire company (this or any other) based upon your disappointment with your current mattress, as the materials your mattress used were a good quality, but the comfort ended up not being appropriate for your specific needs. I would focus instead upon componentry that is appropriate for your BMI.

I looked and Brooklyn Bedding's #BestMattressEver, and although I thought it looked great and like the idea adding a memory foam topper on their firm mattress if it was too firm,


This would have a 2 lb polyfoam core over multiple layers (2” each) of Dunlop and Talalay latex, but again I would be cautious of choosing something with the expectation that you’d be adding a topper onto it, creating even more of a softer surface comfort which you’ve shown to not necessarily respond as well to. But you are correct that you can always take a firmer mattress and add some plushness to it, but you really can’t take a mattress that is too soft and then make it much harder (as we discussed previously with your wool topper questions).

a quick Google search revealed many people are having a hard time getting them to take the mattress back during the trial period if they didn't like it and some people are having a hard time getting them to honor their warranty. I don't want to deal with that.


I responded to a similar question a few weeks ago. Brooklyn Bedding (and Dreamfoam Bedding – they are part of the same company) is one of the manufacturing members of this site which means that I know them very well and that I believe them are among the best values in the country. There are no issues with returns at either BB or DF (if a return is performed, it is handled through a local donation). I went back and looked at the “reviews” on yelp and I have to admit they only further reinforce what I’m always writing about the unreliability of using reviews ( post #13 ), pro or con, as any sort of educated analysis of a product. Complaints about having to keep the product at least 30 days before being able to return (having to do this is spelled out clearly in the BB returns page ), or wanting to be able to return a mattress or get a credit after the 120 day trial period, or not liking the comfort (comfort preference isn’t part of a warranty from a mattress company), or complaints about returns being difficult (returns are handled by local donations – you don’t have to box it up and send it back) reflect more on the lack of responsibility of the individuals making the complaints rather than the quality of the product. I understand that people can be upset for reasons, real or imagined, and mistakes can happen with service or with a product, but reviews like these to me seem to be more about people attempting to recruit an army to their side and turn their opinion into fact, as if creating an online post somehow accomplishes just that.

Brooklyn Bedding and Dreamfoam are two of the largest online mattress manufacturers, selling tens of thousands of mattresses a year, and these 11 negative “reviews” on yelp about them run counter to my actual experience with them over the years, and I can point to dozens of times they have gone above and beyond to assist customers with real concerns or problems. The kind of integrity they display is more rare in the industry today and is one of the reasons that most people (including me) have such a high opinion of them, so I personally wouldn’t have a concern with either their service or return policies.

I am seriously considering the Eco Terra bed you discussed here , but most people tell me springs are no good for larger people.


I’m not sure form where you’re getting this advice, but I certainly wouldn’t agree with it. While high BMI presents special challenges and generally requires firmer materials (in the support layers especially), this could be either firmer latex, polyfoam or innersprings (the type of support component would be a personal preference and in the right design either could be suitable) or even a zoned construction. The same overall guidelines apply with higher weights though that PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) along with using high quality durable materials that will maintain their feel and performance for longer periods of time are the way to make the best choices. Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any types of mattress using springs or foams for the support core and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

Also, they seem to be great at honoring their return period (well, they were for the one person i found who returned it) but I have found no information about people needing to use their warranty.


Again, using “reviews” to make your decision is the least reliable manner of which to choose a product. If you had found one review that said the company was poor at honoring their return policy, would this suddenly make them a product unworthy of your consideration? I wouldn't think so. And just because you can’t find information about someone having to use their warranty (the company wouldn’t make those statistics public) wouldn’t tell you anything, good or bad, about the appropriateness of the mattress for your use. Instead, I would recommend that you focus on the materials contained within the mattress, as this will give you your best chance for success and durability.

If I decide on this bed, should I go for the medium firm due to my size or does size really not matter with this bed?


Yes, your BMI and specific back issues will matter and if you decide to purchase from this company I would recommend a phone call and speak with them, as they will be in the best position to provide advice for what they offer that they think might work best for you, as they will be the most familiar with the products/configurations that they offer.

Luma Sleep Mattress (mattress only). This bed looks similar to the Eco Terra, but does not have as much latex in the comfort layer, there is only one firmness level, and the warranty isn't as long.


The Luma Mattress is offering in three designations of comfort (Soft, Medium-Firm and Firm) where the latex layers are changed with their ILD (19, 28, 36). They even offer the option to upgrade to a Combi-Zone innerspring unit. They are a member here of the site, with over 60 year of mattress experience, much of that in the latex industry. With your past experience, you may desire trying something with fewer comfort layers on top with a bit firmer of a surface plushness. If you were considering a configuration like this, they certainly would be worth a phone call and you could explain your past experiences with the Ultimate Dreams and see if they had any guidance for you.

Regarding warranties, they in general are not nearly as important to me as knowing the materials because the reason most people need to replace a mattress is not a manufacturing defect but the loss of comfort and/or support, which is not covered by a warranty. Knowing the materials in a mattress will tell you how long the original qualities of a mattress will last relative to other types of materials, and are much more important than the time period for replacement of defects in workmanship. A ten-year warranty is the "standard" for many brands in North America, although I would be fine with a five year warranty on a product I know used high quality and durable materials.

As an aside, are you still using your wire grid foundation, and if so, how is that holding up?

If you think that you’d do better by trying out some mattresses in person, let me know your zip code and I’ll do my best to see if I am aware of any better local options for you to test out.

Phoenix
17 Apr 2017 12:17
  • drog
  • drog's Avatar
A few years ago, I purchased an Ultimate Dreams mattress. It did not offer nearly enough support, stretching my back in really bad ways and it was very uncomfortable in the shoulders. This bed was a medium firmness, and while I am a bigger guy I have slept on tons different beds of various firmness levels and never experienced anything so uncomfortable. I ended up flipping the mattress over, and while certainly not comfortable it did not cause any pain that way. Fast forward a few years and I've had issues with sciatica (couldn't get out of bed for a month) and a few months later had to have back surgery to relieve another pinched nerve (took a few months to recover). The base foam (what I'm sleeping on) in my bed is now deteriorating and my back is starting to feel compressed when I wake up so I think it's time to cut my losses and buy a new bed.

I love the firm yet soft feel of memory foam but hate feeling stuck. With that in mind I think I would love some sort of a memory foam hybrid bed but I have not found anything suitable for someone my size in the price range I can afford. The most important factors in a bed for me is to minimize pressure points and have a healthy sleep environment for the nerves in my back.

I recently spoke with someone at Dreamfoam Bedding who recommended their Eurotop bed with a level 3 firmness for me after discussing my issues I'm having with my bed, but I'm having a hard time convincing myself to go with this company again due to my disappointment with my current bed.

I looked and Brooklyn Bedding's #BestMattressEver, and although I thought it looked great and like the idea adding a memory foam topper on their firm mattress if it was too firm, a quick Google search revealed many people are having a hard time getting them to take the mattress back during the trial period if they didn't like it and some people are having a hard time getting them to honor their warranty. I don't want to deal with that.

I am seriously considering the Eco Terra bed you discussed here , but most people tell me springs are no good for larger people. Still, I like the idea of having a bed that is suitable for people of different weights. Also, they seem to be great at honoring their return period (well, they were for the one person i found who returned it) but I have found no information about people needing to use their warranty. If I decide on this bed, should I go for the medium firm due to my size or does size really not matter with this bed?

Luma Sleep Mattress (mattress only). This bed looks similar to the Eco Terra, but does not have as much latex in the comfort layer. EDIT: It is $100 cheaper though and they are willing to make the bed with the combi-zone spring system (which they recommend for someone my size). Add the Mattress Underground discount and this may be the way to go.

Do you have any other recommendations for me to look at?
01 Nov 2016 19:13
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi jessa,

Hey Phoenix! Just wanted to you let you know that all the parts for our bed finally arrived and we put it all together tonight. I haven't had a chance to sleep on it yet so I don't have any comments on the mattress


I’m glad everything arrived. I’ll be interested in learning about your experience with the mattress after you’ve had a chance to use it for a while.

but I have to say I'm fairly disappointed with the wood foundation from Mattresses.net.
It doesn't feel all that secure and when I sat on the mattress at the bottom, I heard what sounded like cracking.


I'm sorry to hear that, but the first thing I’d do is make sure that everything is secured properly with the corner bolts and the wing nuts. The product itself it quite simple and similar to many of the KD foundations available in the industry. The cracking noise can be common on KD foundations with some stress relieved from where the head to toe beams are joined together with their support pieces. If you’re not going to be moving the foundation often, I’d recommend following the instructions here and secure your cross slats with wood screws. It really does make a world of difference with any KD foundation.

I'm really worried about wood fragments falling off and hitting my cat since he loves to sleep under the bed. Also, one of the wood slats came apart from the ribbon that holds it all together. And also, there were a lot of wood shards from the foundation, I really wasn't expecting that. I really wish I had bought a higher quality foundation.


It would be quite odd for “shards’ to come off of your foundation, or for wood slats to splinter off. Again, I’d refer to my suggestion above about using wood screw to secure the cross slats if you’re concerned about making your foundation as solid as possible.

Also, I wanted to mention that we splurged and bought the Knickerbocker Embrace bed frame. I LOVE it! It's incredibly sturdy and took no time at all to put together. Pretty much idiot proof too, haha.


Yes, those frames, while quite expensive, are very strong.

If you still have questions about your foundation, I wouldn’t hesitate to give the people at Arizona Premium Mattresses (Mattreses.net) a call. I’m sure they’ll be happy to be of assistance.

Phoenix
01 Nov 2016 18:45
  • jessa
  • jessa's Avatar

Hi jessa,

Thanks so much for your help! We ended up buying the firm version of the #BestMattressEver and the wood foundation from Mattresses.net.


Thank you for the update, and congratulations on your new mattress purchase! As you know, you made a good quality/value choice. :)

I spoke with someone there and was assured that the weight limit was very high, so much that you could put a waterbed on it if you wanted and I know how heavy waterbeds can be.


Yes, waterbeds are very heavy, so you should be just fine.

I've been in pain from our bed for a while now and I really hope this bed works out for us.


So do I!

I did want to mention that the bed frame/foundation we had from Walmart actually broke this week, we had only had it for 80 days so we were within the 90 day return period for Walmart and got our money back, I would not recommend that frame for anyone who is heavy,


I’m sorry to hear that your frame broke, but I’m glad it was within the warranty period. I appreciate your feedback on your Spa Sensations Steel Smart Base.

I look forward to your comments about your new mattress once you’ve had a chance to sleep on it for a while.

Phoenix


Hey Phoenix! Just wanted to you let you know that all the parts for our bed finally arrived and we put it all together tonight. I haven't had a chance to sleep on it yet so I don't have any comments on the mattress but I have to say I'm fairly disappointed with the wood foundation from Mattresses.net.

It doesn't feel all that secure and when I sat on the mattress at the bottom, I heard what sounded like cracking. My husband assures me that it's not cracking but it sure sounds like it. I'm really worried about wood fragments falling off and hitting my cat since he loves to sleep under the bed. Also, one of the wood slats came apart from the ribbon that holds it all together. And also, there were a lot of wood shards from the foundation, I really wasn't expecting that. I really wish I had bought a higher quality foundation.

Also, I wanted to mention that we splurged and bought the Knickerbocker Embrace bed frame. I LOVE it! It's incredibly sturdy and took no time at all to put together. Pretty much idiot proof too, haha.

I did get a chance to lie down on the mattress and it feels really nice but I can tell it's going to take a lot of time to get used to.
06 Aug 2016 14:46
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Tulrin,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! ... and I'm glad you found us :)

I'm 5'10, 145 lbs. Primarily a back and side sleeper. Looking to replace my Spa Sensations (Zinus) Theratouch 12" mattress. It started off great, but 5 years in it's noticeably lost support. To my understanding, it's 3" of 3 lb memory foam on 3" of ventilated poly(?) foam and then 6" of base layer.


Your mattress has lower quality and less durable materials than I would normally suggest so it's not surprising that it had a shorter useful life as well. You were probably fortunate that you were able to get 5 years of use from it.

Looking to spend about $1000 or less on a king sized mattress. Unfortunately, I'm not very good at co-sleeping (GF moving will keep me alert and awake, etc.), so I'd like something that minimizes motion transfer. This presumably means memory foam or similar. Will be on a platform bed using slats.


There is more information about motion transfer relative to different materials and types of mattresses in post #18 here . You are right that in general terms memory foam is the most effective material in terms of isolating motion.

I'm willing to spend more than bottom of the barrel prices for quality/value, but I prefer to avoid going extravagant. The midrange bed in a box type mattresses seem to offer good quality at a reasonable price, so that's where I've been focusing my search. I am open to alternatives, though I'm wary of the major mattress chains and their purchasing experience.

Tried briefly lying on a friend's Tuft & Needle while she bounced a bit. The motion transfer was certainly less than a coil mattress, but not quite the undisturbed glass of wine you see in the Tempurpedic commercials. My Zinus is... eh, decent for motion transfer. Not amazing, but decent.


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well he will sleep), durability (how long he will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

If you are considering online options that you can't test in person before a purchase then the mattress shopping tutorial includes several links to lists of many of the better online options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) that include many different types and categories of mattresses that use different materials and components in a wide range of designs, budgets, firmness levels, and with different return/exchange policies that may be well worth considering as well.

One of the lists includes many of the better online memory foam options I'm aware of and many of these are well inside your budget range as well.

If you would also like to do some local testing where you can test a mattress for motion transfer in person before a purchase then if you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

Addable, $650, 2" 4 lb gel memory, 2" 1.8 lb poly, 6" 2 lb poly
Brooklyn Bedding #BestMattressEver, $900, 2" Talalay, 2" Dunlop, 6" 2 lb poly
Leesa, $990, 2" 3.75 lb poly, 2" 3 lb memory, 6" 1.75 lb poly
Nest Bedding Love Bed, $899, 2" 2.7 lb poly, 1" 1.8 lb poly, 6" 1.8 lb poly
SleepEZ Kiss Mattress, $895, 1.5" Talalay, 1.5" 4 lb poly, 7" 2 lb poly
Yogabed, $974, .75" 5 lb poly, 1.75" 4 lb gel memory, 6,5" 1.8 lb poly, 1" 1.8 lb poly
Zotto, $995, 2" 4.5 lb gel memory, 2" 4 lb memory, 2" 3.1 lb poly, 4" 1.8 lb poly


While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

There are some comments about all of the mattresses you listed in post #2 here in the simplified choice topic along with many of the other simplified choice mattresses as well and post #1 in the same topic would be well worth reading as well.

With the exception of the Leesa which uses 2" of 3 lb memory foam ... there are no lower quality materials or weak links that would compromise the durability or useful life of any of the mattresses you listed. The 3 lb memory foam in the Leesa is underneath 2" of polyfoam which would absorb some of the compression forces that come from sleeping on a mattress which would improve the durability of the 3 lb memory foam underneath it a little so while it may be more risky than the others in terms of durability ... with your lighter BMI the odds would be higher that it will maintain it's comfort and support for a reasonable length of time as well.

I'm leaning towards the Addable, Leesa, Nest, Yoga, or Zotto because they seem like they'll have the least motion transfer and still be reasonably cool sleeping. Am I looking in the right direction? Way off base? Any distinguishing factors between them, that might help me decide?


When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

Having said that ... mattresses that have memory foam as the top layer would have the higher odds of having the least amount of motion transfer than mattresses that use more resilient materials in the top layer and thicker layers of memory foam may be more effective than thinner layers as well but there are also differences between different memory foam formulations and mattress designs so the only way to know for certain whether any mattress is "motion isolating enough" for you will be based on your own careful testing or your own personal experience when you sleep on it.

One of the advantages of trying mattresses locally is that you can try many different types and styles and firmness levels and compare them to each other in "real time" based on your actual experience rather than just "theory" instead of trying one mattress and not knowing how it compares to the other mattresses that you could have tried or purchased instead.

Of course many online mattresses have a good trial period and return policy so you can try them in your bedroom instead of a showroom with little risk (outside of the time you spend sleeping on it and/or returning it if that becomes necessary or any costs involved in the return process) so if it's not a "good enough" match for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (including motion transfer) you can just return it and try another mattress although of course you will only know whether it's "good enough" and you won't know whether it would have been better or worse or how it compares to other mattresses that you could have purchased that you haven't tried in person.

Phoenix
06 Aug 2016 13:51
  • Tulrin
  • Tulrin's Avatar
Hi! I've been hit with decision paralysis on finding a new mattress, so figured I'd come here for input.

I'm 5'10, 145 lbs. Primarily a back and side sleeper. Looking to replace my Spa Sensations (Zinus) Theratouch 12" mattress. It started off great, but 5 years in it's noticeably lost support. To my understanding, it's 3" of 3 lb memory foam on 3" of ventilated poly(?) foam and then 6" of base layer.

Looking to spend about $1000 or less on a king sized mattress. Unfortunately, I'm not very good at co-sleeping (GF moving will keep me alert and awake, etc.), so I'd like something that minimizes motion transfer. This presumably means memory foam or similar. Will be on a platform bed using slats.

I'm willing to spend more than bottom of the barrel prices for quality/value, but I prefer to avoid going extravagant. The midrange bed in a box type mattresses seem to offer good quality at a reasonable price, so that's where I've been focusing my search. I am open to alternatives, though I'm wary of the major mattress chains and their purchasing experience.

Tried briefly lying on a friend's Tuft & Needle while she bounced a bit. The motion transfer was certainly less than a coil mattress, but not quite the undisturbed glass of wine you see in the Tempurpedic commercials. My Zinus is... eh, decent for motion transfer. Not amazing, but decent.

I've been looking in particular at the following mattresses (thanks to Phoenix for the wealth of info on this site). Thoughts? Any I should add to or remove from the list? I understand it's difficult to make specific recommendations, and at some point I'll probably have to take a bit of a gamble and and pick one (returnable, but I'd prefer to not waste a bunch of mattresses finding one that works). That said, I'd like to do what I can to at least look in the right direction first.

Current: Zinus 12", $319, 3" 3 lb memory foam, 3" poly(?) foam, 6" base (poly?)

Addable, $650, 2" 4 lb gel memory, 2" 1.8 lb poly, 6" 2 lb poly
Brooklyn Bedding #BestMattressEver, $900, 2" Talalay, 2" Dunlop, 6" 2 lb poly
Leesa, $990, 2" 3.75 lb poly, 2" 3 lb memory, 6" 1.75 lb poly
Nest Bedding Love Bed, $899, 2" 2.7 lb poly, 1" 1.8 lb poly, 6" 1.8 lb poly
SleepEZ Kiss Mattress, $895, 1.5" Talalay, 1.5" 4 lb poly, 7" 2 lb poly
Yogabed, $974, .75" 5 lb poly, 1.75" 4 lb gel memory, 6,5" 1.8 lb poly, 1" 1.8 lb poly
Zotto, $995, 2" 4.5 lb gel memory, 2" 4 lb memory, 2" 3.1 lb poly, 4" 1.8 lb poly

I'm leaning towards the Addable, Leesa, Nest, Yoga, or Zotto because they seem like they'll have the least motion transfer and still be reasonably cool sleeping. Am I looking in the right direction? Way off base? Any distinguishing factors between them, that might help me decide?

Thanks!
01 Aug 2016 18:57
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi milleraj21,

1) No chemical flame retardants


There is more about "safe" fire barriers in this article and post #2 here and the posts it links to at the end.

The most common method used to pass the fire regulations in the mattress industry is the use of inherent, "non chemical" fire barrier fabrics that are either quilted into the cover or are wrapped around the inner materials of the mattress like a sock and foams that use fire retardant chemicals are much more common in the furniture industry than they are in the mattress industry.

A wool fire barrier or a non chemical inherent fire barrier would certainly be "safe enough" for most people.

2) Minimizing offgassing and chemical exposure

So far I'm considering latex and Certi-Pur certified foam mattresses. I'm wondering if the Certi-Pur mattresses are, even though "cleaner", still likely to have a chemiical smell and offgas? I would love some insights on that.


The only reliable way to to assess the "safety" of different materials in more general terms is based on lab tests and the certifications they have for harmful substances and VOCs so that you have some assurance than the VOCs are below the testing limits for the certification (see post #2 here for more information about some of the more reliable "safety" certifications). If the materials in a mattress or the mattress itself has a reliable "safety" certification then for most people they would certainly be "safe enough" ... regardless of the type of material or the name of the manufacturer on the label.

I would also keep in mind that the smell of a material isn't an indication of whether it is harmful or not because some harmful VOC's have no smell at all and some VOC's that are completely safe can sometimes have a stronger smell (such as some natural rubber, natural wool, or even a rose).

All foam materials will generally have "some" initial smell that will dissipate to levels that most people won't notice fairly quickly (unless they are very sensitive to that particular smell).

3) Prefer a medium to maybe a little softer than medium feel mattress .
4) A mattress that will be durable and not break down quickly


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

Hopefully you've already read the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

An online retailer or manufacturer will generally suggest a mattress that they believe has the best chance of success based on their knowledge and experience and the information you provide them because this is in both your own and their best interests but at the end of the day the only way to know for certain whether any specific mattress is a good match for you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP will be based on your own careful testing or your own personal experience so if you can't test a specific mattress in person then the options you have available after a purchase to either exchange the mattress or individual layers or components or return the mattress for a refund (and any costs involved) would generally become a more important part of your personal value equation just in case a mattress your purchase doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for.

Again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress but outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines I linked relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ). The best way to know which types of materials or mattresses you tend to prefer in general terms will be based on your own local testing or your own personal experience.

For natural latex, I'm looking at
1) Flexus Comfort
2) Latex Mattress Factory
3) Sleep on Latex
4) My Green Mattress


All of these are members of this site which means that I think highly of them and that I believe they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency. All of them use high quality materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links that would compromise the durability or useful life of any of them.

For Certi-Pur foam mattresses I'm so far considering:
1) Tuft & Needle
2) Brooklyn Bedding (this mattress also has manufactured latex, which I don't know a ton about yet)


Brooklyn Bedding is also a member of this site.

There is more information about both the Tuft & Needle mattress and the Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver along with many of the other "simplifed choice" mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice mattress topic and post #1 in the same topic would be well worth reading as well. The BME uses higher quality and more durable materials that would be suitable for any weight range although both of them would be suitable for more "average" weight ranges (in lower 200's or so or less)

The choice between different types and blends of latex is also more of a preference and budget choice rather than a "better/worse" choice and any type or blend of latex is a durable material relative to other types of foam materials. There is more about the different types and blends of latex in post #6 here and more about how Dunlop compares to Talalay in general in post #7 here but the best way to know which type or blend of latex you tend to prefer will be based on your own testing and/or your own personal experience.

All the latex you are likely to encounter (either Dunlop or Talalay that is made with either natural or synthetic rubber or a blend of both) will have a reliable certification such as Oeko-Tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold or C2C and based on actual testing I would consider any type or blend of latex to be a very "safe" material in terms of harmful substances and VOC's (offgassing) as well.

3) Brentwood Home Bamboo Gel (there doesn't seem to be a ton of specs on this on their website).
(There seem to be a LOT of choices in this category - Leesa, Casper, etc).


The Brentwood Home mattresses don't contain any information about the quality/density of their foam materials on their website so I can't make any meaningful comments about their quality or durability but if you can find out the information in this article and post it on the forum I'd be happy to let you know if there are any lower quality materials or weak links that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

I'd love to know thoughts on the chemical exposure with Certi-Pur foams vs. manufactured latex vs natural latex. (I have chemical sensitivities so that's important for us.) I'd also appreciate the names of any other manufacturers that may meet our criteria and that I should consider. Thanks so much, in advance, for any insights.


I personally wouldn't have any concerns with any material that has a reliable safety certification and uses a non chemical inherent fire barrier.

While it may be more information than you are looking for ... there is also a lot more information in post #2 here and the more detailed posts and information it links to about safe, natural, organic, "chemical free", and "green" mattresses and mattress materials that can help you sort through some of the marketing information and terminology that you will encounter in the industry and can help you differentiate between them and answer "how safe is safe enough for me" and that can help you decide on the type of materials and components you are most comfortable having in your mattress or on the certifications that may be important to you. These types of issues are complex and are generally specific to each person and their individual sensitivities, circumstances, criteria, beliefs, and lifestyle choices.

Once you have narrowed down your options to a list of finalists that are all choices between "good and good" and you have confirmed that none of them have any lower quality materials or "weak links" in their design and if at this point there are no clear winners between them (which is usually a good indication that you have done some good research) then you are in the fortunate position that any of them would likely be a suitable choice and post #2 here can help you make a final choice based on your more detailed conversations with each of them, your personal preferences, your confidence about PPP and the suitability of each one, their prices, the options you have after a purchase to fine tune the mattress or exchange or return the mattress or individual layers and any costs involved, any additional extras that are part of each purchase, and on "informed best judgement" based on all the other objective, subjective, and intangible parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
21 Jul 2016 08:45
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi sancor,

Welcome ... and I'm glad you found us :).

After seeing the difference the change in pillows made, I started reading up on mattresses and realized that it was absolutely NOT normal for me to be waking up with pain (specifically shoulder pain) every single day. I would be woken up by the pain, and began to wonder if that could explain why I'm always feeling exhausted.


If you are waking up with pain during the course of the night then it could certainly explain exhaustion in the morning and over the course of the day. While a suitable mattress and pillow won't solve any medical or physiological issues that could be the cause of your shoulder pain they could still make "some" difference in terms of either making it worse or better. On the other hand if the cause of your shoulder pain is a mattress and/or a pillow that isn't suitable for your body type or sleeping style and you don't have specific medical or physiological issues that are causing the pain then it's certainly a sign that you probably need a new mattress or pillow.

While it's not possible to "diagnose" mattress comfort issues on a forum with any certainty because they can be very complex and there are too many unique unknowns, variables, and complexities involved that can affect how each person sleeps on a mattress in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP or any "symptoms" they experience ... there is more about the most common symptoms that people may experience when they sleep on a mattress and the most likely (although not the only) reasons for them in post #2 here .

A suitable pillow is an essential part of good alignment for the head and neck and upper body because the gap between the head and the mattress and the curve of the cervical spine needs to be supported just like all other parts of the spine. Like mattresses ... there are certain "needs" that depend on body type and sleeping positions but with pillows, personal preferences play a more important role because the face is much more sensitive to textures, temperature, smells, and other more subjective "feel" based properties of a pillow. There is more about choosing pillows in the pillow thread here and the other topics and sources of information that it links to that may be helpful.

So that was my motivation to get started. I began researching and quickly became overwhelmed with the number of online mattresses that were available, and I had practically no way of discerning their differences (until I found this site, thank you!). What I ended up doing was filtering options based on what seemed to be an innovative technology or approach (I'm a scientist so I can't help myself). That led me to shortlist the Purple bed, Luxisleep, and Helix. In retrospect this might not have been the smartest way to narrow down choices.


While I certainly agree that technology can be interesting ... any specific technology may be beneficial or detrimental to how you sleep depending on the specifics of the technology and the mattress so "technology" alone certainly isn't any guarantee that you will sleep well on a mattress in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences). The only way to know for certain how well you will sleep on any mattress will be based on your own personal experience.

Anyhow, I ordered the Purple bed because it seemed to be the most innovative and I could find very little online that further described the Luxi and Helix from a consumer's perspective.


You've probably seen this already but there is more information about the Purple mattress and the buckling column gel they use (that they call a "hyperelastic polymer" to differentiate themselves from other mattresses that use buckling column gel) in post #2 here .

There are also some comments about the type and quality of the materials in the Luxisleep mattress in post #10 here and there are some comments about the type and quality of the materials the Helix mattress along with many of the other simplified choice mattresses in post #2 here in the simplified choice topic and post #1 in the same topic would be worth reading as well. Once again ... with or without "technology" ... the only way to know for certain how you will sleep on any mattress will be based on your own personal experience.

Initial impression: The Purple bed was really unique - you can definitely feel the honeycomb structure of the hyperelastic polymer layer but it isn't at all offputting.


While buckling column gel certainly has some unique properties ... the "feel" of the buckling column gel is something that some people don't mind and that other people don't particularly like (particularly when they move or change positions). Many manufacturers that use buckling column gel as a comfort layer will put a relatively thin foam layer on top of the buckling column gel to help even out the "feel" of the buckling columns.

The bed initially felt very conforming while also being a much firmer feel than the innerspring + memory foam topper I was used to sleeping on. I have to say that I really loved the "bounce" and feel of this mattress. The first two nights were magic - my partner and I hardly woke up during the night and in the mornings we had no pain. We even felt much more rested and energetic during the day. But something that had me worried from the beginning was that when we checked our spinal alignment on this bed (both of us are side sleepers) neither of us were well-aligned. Our spines would slope up about 20 degrees or so starting at around our shoulders with a pillow. Our shoulders just don't seem to "sink" in enough to align the spine. The deviation from correct alignment was slightly less bad if we checked without a pillow and just held our heads up, so maybe we need a new pillow to actually be aligned in this bed?


It's certainly possible that your pillow may be too thin to keep your head and neck in good alignment but it's also possible that the comfort layers in the mattress aren't thick/soft enough to allow your shoulders to sink in far enough as well. I would keep in mind that the buckling column gel is only 2" thick so the other layers and components in the mattress will also have an effect on how your shoulders sink into a mattress. Either way ... good alignment is the single most important factor in how well you sleep over the course of the night.

Starting after the third night, and persisting to now (about 1.5 weeks) I have been having my shoulder pain return. It is a little different from before, and if I have my partner point out the part of my spine where it begins to slope upwards, it pretty much pinpoints the pain. I'm feeling it much more on my left side than on my right, and I'm now starting to get some lumbar and lower back pain. My partner is similarly beginning to feel his mid and lower back pain return. I will say the pain is significantly less than with the original mattress, but still very much a problem. I ordered two new pillows to see if that would improve the situation, but if that doesn't work then I'm going to need to go back to the drawing board. It's just so weird to me that the bed was performing so well for us the first couple nights :(.


It's not unusual that a new mattress can make a difference for a short time even if it doesn't keep you in the best alignment because your alignment will be different from your previous mattress and sometimes change itself (even if it isn't a "good" change") can make a difference in how you sleep for a short time because it may help relieve the primary issue on your old mattress and it may take a little time for any new issues to "show up".

There will be a break in and adjustment period for any new mattress or sleeping system as the mattress loses any of it's "false firmness" and the cover stretches and loosens a little and the materials settle and your body gets used to a sleeping surface that is different from what it is used to (see post #3 here ). This could typically be a few weeks but it can be shorter or longer depending on the specifics of the person and the mattress (higher density materials can take longer) and it can be surprising to some people how much their sleeping experience can change over the course of the first few weeks.

I guess here I'll just re-confirm - as a side sleeper I should be sleeping on a bed that keeps my spine perfectly straight, correct?


Your spine needs to be in "neutral" alignment where the mattress does most of the work involved in keeping you in good alignment instead of tension in your muscles and ligaments but in real life it's not realistic to expect that it will be "ruler straight" because there will generally be some relatively small and gentle curves in your spine that don't affect how well you sleep. Of course this can vary from person to person and some people are more flexible and are closer to the "I can sleep on anything" end of the range and others may be closer to the "princess and the pea" end of the range but "as straight as possible" is the goal.


Next steps: I'm still considering the luxisleep mattress, I can't help but admire their innovation, and it strikes me that the different firmness options might increase the chance of getting proper alignment. I'm also now taking a step back from overly prioritizing innovative designs and putting more value on super high quality materials. In that regard I'm considering Brooklyn Bedding for the degree of latex and the inclusion of higher quality polyfoam in the base.


As you probably know the Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver is a great quality/value choice that uses very durable materials but again the only way to know for certain how well you will sleep on any mattress will be based on your own personal experience.

I'm also considering trying to find a local store where I might be able to try more beds, but considering that it took a few nights of sleeping on the Purple to realize its problems I'm not sure how much I can trust an initial "feel" anymore. I'm not really aware of any good non-chain mattress stores in Boston, but if anyone here can share a location I'd be very appreciative.


This makes a lot of sense to me regardless of whether you end up buying a mattress locally or online. Some local testing will give you some experience and reference points about the type of materials and mattresses you tend to prefer and the general firmness level that tends to work best for you.

while nothing has a 100% success rate ... with a local purchase and for the majority of people ... careful testing using the guidelines in the tutorial (rather than just testing for the more subjective "comfort" of a mattress which often won't predict how well you will sleep on a mattress or how it will "feel" when you sleep on it at home) along with some good guidance from a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests in mind will usually result in a mattress choice that is well inside a suitable comfort/support range and will generally be "close enough" so that if any fine tuning is necessary it would be relatively minor and involve different mattress pads, sheets, mattress protectors, or perhaps even a topper if a mattress is too firm (see post #4 here and post #10 here ).

There is also more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for in post #2 here .

Any specific mattress may be the "best" match for a relatively small percentage of people, a "good" match for a larger percentage, and an "OK" match for a larger percentage yet but the only way to know for certain whether the mattress you end up choosing will be a "good enough" match for you to keep it (even if it isn't the "best match" out of all the mattresses that you "could have tried" instead) will be based on careful testing and/or your own personal experience when you sleep on it.

One of the advantages of trying mattresses locally is that you can try many different types and styles and firmness levels and compare them to each other in "real time" based on your actual experience rather than just "theory" instead of trying one mattress and not knowing how it compares to the other mattresses that you could have tried or purchased instead.

Of course many online mattresses have a good trial period and return policy so you can try them in your bedroom instead of a showroom with little risk (outside of the time you spend sleeping on it and/or returning it if that becomes necessary or any costs involved in the return process) so if it's not a "good enough" match for you you can just return it and try another mattress although of course you won't know whether it would have been better or worse or how it compares to other mattresses that you could have tried that you haven't tried in person.

Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent (see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines here ... the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Boston area are listed in post #2 here .

In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
15 Jul 2016 21:27
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi SadieKatt,

-Side sleeper (but I've always gravitated toward firmer mattresses. I often have shoulder/neck pain and wake up with arms falling asleep. I'm thinking I should try something a little softer?)


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

There are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

-Feel cold at the beginning of the night, but often wake up too hot.


While it's not possible to quantify the sleeping temperature of a mattress for any particular person with any real accuracy because there are so many variables involved including the type of mattress protector and the sheets and bedding that you use (which in many cases can have just as significant an effect on sleeping temperature as the type of foam in a mattress) and on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range and because there is no standardized testing for temperature regulation with different combinations of materials ... there is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here that can help you choose the types of materials and components that are most likely to keep you in a comfortable temperature range.

It may be worth considering a mattress protector that is quilted with wool which can help to regulate temperature in both directions. There is more about the pros and cons of different types of mattress protectors and some examples of each of them in post #89 here .

I thought I had found a good deal with the Dreamfoam Ultimate Dreams mattress, at $599 for the queen. But it has quite a few poor reviews on Amazon. People are saying there are depressions in it after a short time. I thought latex is supposed to be more durable against that?

Next I looked at Brooklyn Bedding BME. It's $750 for a queen, which is more than I really wanted to spend for an RV. I'm also unsure since Dreamfoam and BB are sister companies, and the Dreamfoam has those poor reviews. Even though the BME costs more, is it using the same materials?


I would be very cautious about paying too much attention to some of the Amazon comments you are mentioning or reviews in general (either positive or negative) because they don't generally provide any context or enough information to identify the many reasons that could account for the comments they are making. Latex in general is the most durable foam material in the industry so outside of any defects in the latex itself (which is very uncommon) if there is any sagging it would be in the quilting layers or the base layer under the mattress or in many cases what they are calling "sagging" is really what I call "virtual impressions" which are the result of choosing a comfort level that is too soft. You can see some more detailed comments about this in post #2 here .

While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that once again you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

There is more information about the pros and cons of the Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver and the Dreamfoam Ultimate Dreams latex mattress in post #4 here and the posts it links to that should also be helpful but both of them would certainly make great quality/value choices. Neither of them have any lower quality materials or weak links that would be a cause for concern in terms of the durability or useful life of either one of them for someone in your weight range.

I also considered buying a polyfoam base from Ikea or the Dreamfoam UD Crazy Quilt Flattop and then adding a 2" Talalay Latex topper from sleeponlatex.com. Then I read about the Sedona Sleep mattress, and saw that it was the same thing I was trying to do, except that I would know for sure that the base and topper are the same size. It's more than I wanted to spend ($870), but because they are separate pieces, they may be removable from the RV and I could use them longer. Also, if the firmness isn't right, I could probably still fit the topper out of the door to exchange it. I do have concerns about the topper moving around the mattress. I've used a topper before and it was about 4" smaller than the mattress and constantly shifting.


You can see my comments about choosing a firmer mattress first with the intention of adding a softer topper later in post #2 here .

In most cases I would avoid this approach because of the uncertainty involved with making two purchase choices instead of only one and choosing a topper that would be suitable in terms of thickness, firmness, and PPP for a specific person on a specific mattress can sometimes be almost as difficult as choosing a mattress that doesn't need a topper in the first place. I would generally focus on choosing a mattress that is likely to be a suitable match without a topper (unless you can test the combination in person or you are purchasing both online as a "set" that is designed to work together and they both have a good return/exchange policy) and then use the option to add a topper as a "backup" strategy in case your initial choice is too firm and doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for rather than a "primary" strategy.

If you do decide to try the mattress/topper strategy then if the only issue with a mattress is that it is too firm and there are no soft spots or sagging in the mattress then a good quality topper can certainly be an effective way to add some additional softness, "comfort" and pressure relief to your sleeping system but the only way to know for certain whether a specific mattress/topper combination is a good "match" for both of you in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP is based on your own careful testing or personal experience on the combination. If you can't test the combination in person then there will always be always some risk and uncertainty involved in adding a topper because the specifics of the mattress itself along with your own body type, sleeping position, and preferences can affect which specific topper would be a suitable choice on any specific mattress.

There is more information about choosing a topper and a link to the better online sources I'm aware of in post #2 here and the topper guidelines it links to which along with a conversation with a reliable and knowledgeable supplier (that can provide you with good information about how their toppers compare to each other or to other toppers they are familiar with that are available on the market) can help you use your sleeping experience as a reference point and guideline to help you choose the type, thickness, and firmness for a topper that has the least possible risk and the best chance for success. A good exchange/return policy can also reduce the risk of an online topper purchase so I would make sure you are comfortable with the options you have available after a purchase just in case the topper you choose doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for.

Lastly, I've also considered the 8" Sage mattress from Sleep Innovations, and adding an inch or two Talalay topper. The Sage is only $299.


My comments above would also apply to this mattress and I would also avoid buying any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/density of the materials inside it (see this article ) so you can compare them to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress.

Are there any other options I should consider? I would love a solution under $700.


Outside of the Dreamfoam, Brooklyn Bedding, and Sedona Sleep mattresses you've already mentioned ... some of the lower budget latex or latex hybrid mattresses that are listed in posts #3 and #4 here may also be worth considering.

Once you have narrowed down your options to a list of finalists that are all choices between "good and good" and you have confirmed that none of them have any lower quality materials or "weak links" in their design and if at this point there are no clear winners between them (which is usually a good indication that you have done some good research) then you are in the fortunate position that any of them would likely be a suitable choice and post #2 here can help you make a final choice based on your more detailed conversations with each of them, your personal preferences, your confidence about PPP and the suitability of each one, their prices, the options you have after a purchase to fine tune the mattress or exchange or return the mattress or individual layers and any costs involved, any additional extras that are part of each purchase, and on "informed best judgement" based on all the other objective, subjective, and intangible parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
18 Jun 2016 14:10
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Hi eeks,

I think I am about ready to pull the trigger on a BME - would a wood slatted foundation like the one Sleep EZ sells work well for that? I am thinking of getting the wood foundation because in the event I don't like the BME and end up going with a 100% latex mattress I know it would work for that.


A mattress with a polyfoam support core (regardless of the material in the comfort layers) will generally do best with a firm, flat, and evenly supportive support surface underneath it that has minimal to no flex under the mattress and for larger sizes with at least one center support beam that has good support to the floor to prevent any sagging in the middle of the mattress. The components (either a bedframe and foundation or a platform bed) need to be strong and durable enough to support the weight of the mattress and the people sleeping on it without some of the parts bending, sagging, shifting, or breaking with extended use. The support surface under the mattress (which may be slats or a solid surface or a steel or wire grid) should have enough surface area to prevent the mattress from sagging through any gaps or spaces in the support surface over time but still allow some airflow under the mattress. If a foundation or a platform bed has a slatted surface then I would suggest that the gaps between any slats are no more than about 5" (with 1 x 3 slats) although less than 4" would be better yet.

With an all latex mattress then I would suggest gaps that are no more than 3" and once again less would be better yet.

There is more information about support systems (bedframes and foundations or platform beds) that are generally suitable for different types of mattresses and some examples of each of them in post #1 here and some of the information and comments in this topic may be helpful as well.

What is the difference between a wood foundation and the steel fold up one Brooklyn Bedding sells?


The Brooklyn Bedding simple life foundation has a wire grid as a support surface (see post #10 here ) and the SleepEZ foundation has wood slats that are less than 3" apart. While either one would be suitable for a mattress with a polyfoam support core ... the SleepEZ foundation would be more suitable for an all latex mattress because there are less "gaps" in the support surface.

Phoenix
17 Jun 2016 14:01
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Hi eeks,

Ok I was googling Brooklyn Bedding BME today and reading through pages and pages of links of reviews.

Most people that reviewed were pretty positive about it.


From one of my previous replies ...

While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).


In other words ... reading reviews written by people who know little to nothing about mattresses and mattress materials is one of the worst ways to choose a mattress. You could have saved yourself a lot of time and frustration by not spending so much time reading them.

Then I came across a site saying R&S Mattress and Brooklyn Bedding uses materials bought from other companies going out of business - like closeouts and old materials. Is this true? Are they just using piece meal things and glueing it all together to make a mattress? Or do they have their own suppliers of latex and foam and are using good quality materials that are fresh and new just for them? I'm freaked a little!


All of the materials in the Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver are new materials purchased from their foam and fabric suppliers (which also supply other mattress manufacturers as well) and made in their new state of the art factory in Phoenix which is one of the most modern factories in the industry.

And then I came across a site called Old Bed Guy and he was knocking Brooklyn Bedding saying they don't use quality materials and their polyfoam can cause indentations and sinkage and doesn't hold up.


You can see my comments about the Old Bed Guy and his website (and some of the very strange comments he makes) in this topic .. There is "some" good information on his site and some information that is questionable at best and misleading, inaccurate, or deceptive at worst.

He "thinks" he knows a lot more than he really does and some of his comments about some very good manufacturers in the industry (and about this site as well) are nonsensical.

Phoenix
17 May 2016 18:05
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Hi chcfan16,

Welcome to the site ... and I'm glad you found us :).

Any recommendations?


I'll start with the basics ...

While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress. There are just too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but the best place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

When my wife and I first got the Serta iComfort Genius King in 2012 for $1699, we loved it. It was a huge upgrade over the noisy, creaky Queen spring mattress we had. For the first time in years, we looked forward to sleeping and had consistent, restful nights of sleep.

However, within about 3 months, that changed. The mattress started sagging on both sides of the bed, leading us to sink uncomfortably deep into the bed. Back aches and pains ensued.

We had the mattress replaced by the retailer ($169 fee) we purchased it from with a Serta iComfort Recognition, and the problem returned within a month.


While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP which is the most important part of "value", the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label (or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new) so I would always make sure that you find out information listed here so you can compare the materials and components to the quality/durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

The major brands such as Sealy/Stearns & Foster, Simmons, and Serta all tend to use lower quality materials in their mattresses than most of their smaller competitors that will tend to soften or break down prematurely relative to the price you pay which is why I would generally suggest avoiding all of them completely (and the major retailers that focus on them as well) regardless of how they may feel in a showroom along with any mattress where you aren't able to find out the type and quality/durability of the materials inside it (see the guidelines here along with post #3 here and post #12 here and post #404 here ).

Having said that ... even low quality materials wouldn't normally soften or break down that quickly so it's more likely that the mattresses you chose were "on the edge" of being too soft for you in the first place so that even the normal foam softening that happens with any new mattress over the course of the first few weeks (see post #3 here ) was enough to take you outside of the comfort/support range that is suitable for you (see post #2 here ).

We are currently using an equally terrible memory foam topper, which we both sink into.


I'm not sure of the density of the topper you purchased or why you added a topper to your mattress but it's also very likely that it was also a lower quality/density and less durable memory foam than I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines I linked earlier. A topper will also make a mattress softer not firmer and a topper won't "fix" a mattress that is already too soft so it's possible that if your mattress was already too soft that a topper could make your sleeping experience worse. Even if a mattress is too firm and needs an additional topper to soften it up and provide some additional pressure relief then it's also possible that the topper you chose was too thick and added too much additional softness to your mattress so that you were sleeping out of alignment.

We are both overweight (200-250lb), so it is possible that is a factor, but it seems like the bed should not be breaking down so fast, despite that.


There is also more information in post #3 here and the posts it links to that would be helpful for those that are in higher weight ranges

While the process of how to choose a mattress would involve the same steps that are listed in the mattress shopping tutorial ... most people in higher weight ranges will generally need or prefer firmer mattresses (firmer materials will feel softer because you will sink into them more) and materials and components that are higher quality and more durable than those that are in lower weight ranges (the materials and components in a mattress will soften and break down faster for those in higher weight ranges than they will for someone that is in a lower weight range that doesn't compress the mattress as much). I would be particularly cautious about mattresses that use more than "about an inch or so" of memory foam that is less than about 5 lb density or polyfoam that is less than about 2 lb density ... particularly in the upper layers of the mattress.

I am looking at Leesa, Brooklyn Beds, Tuft and Needle, Casper, etc. as a lower cost fix to this problem. However, since they are a combination of memory foam and Latex, I don't want to be out another $1,000 and not solve this.


There is more about what I call "simplified choice" mattresses in general in post #1 here and there is more specific information about the type and quality/durability of the materials in the Leesa, Brooklyn Beds BestMattressEver, Tuft and Needle, Casper and many of the other simplified choice mattresses post #2 here in the same topic.

Criteria

Firm mattress
Pillow top
Little sinking into/form fitting
Will hold up to extra weight
Online retailer with a good return policy


Any recommendations?


In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
22 Mar 2016 08:55
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Hi hereweare,

What would you recommend to someone who has loved the sonno prima and needs a new option?


While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... it's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

I've been looking at Brooklyn bedding mattress and other internet top brands. We sleep on our stomachs and consider our current mattress to be on the firmer side.


You can read more about the Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver and many of the other simplified choice mattresses in post #2 here and the first post in the same topic would be well worth reading as well.

As you probably know from your reading here Brooklyn Bedding is one of the members of this site which means that I think highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency.

Outside of the simplified choice list ... if you are looking at online options then the mattress shopping tutorial also includes several other links to lists of many of the better online options I'm aware of (in the optional online step) that include many different types and categories of mattresses in a wide range of budgets, firmness levels, and with different return/exchange policies that may be worth considering.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

If you let me know your city or zip code I'd also be happy to let you know about any of the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area as well.

Phoenix
20 Feb 2016 22:09
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Hi Meri831,

Thanks for your reply. What is a BBBME?


It means Brooklyn Bedding BestMattressEver which is one of the simplified choice mattresses that are in the list I linked in my last reply. It's a latex/polyfoam hybrid.

I don't want a foam bed.


"Foam" is just a generic name that means a material with air bubbles inside it. It can refer to different types of materials. There are three main types of foam (memory foam, polyfoam, and latex foam) that are all different from each other and most mattresses in the industry contain some foam layers. Your Saatva mattress for example includes some memory foam and some polyfoam layers.

Assuming that the materials in a mattress you are considering are durable enough for your body type and meet the quality/durability guidelines here relative to your weight range ... the choice between different types and combinations of materials and components or different types of mattresses are more of a preference and a budget choice than a "better/worse" choice (see this article ).

My sister did just get a sleep number bed and she loves it. I slept over her house recently while she was away and told her I loved her bed , but I don't need such a fancy $$$$ one , and my husband passed away so the number thing is a waste for me. Is the sleep number a foam bed ? I don't really know. I did sleep great on it though.


Sleep Number is an airbed that uses an air bladder as a support core on the bottom and then has different types and combinations of foam layers (polyfoam or memory foam) on top of the air bladder depending on the specific model.

You can see my thoughts about airbeds in general this article . While any mattress can be a good match for a specific person because each person's needs and preferences or the criteria that are most important to them can be very different ... in general terms I would tend to avoid them unless there is a very compelling reason that an airbed would be a better choice for you in "real life" (outside of the many "marketing stories" that you will hear about them) than the many other options or types of mattresses that are available to you.

If you are committed to an airbed and you are convinced that there are no other types of mattresses that will meet your criteria then there are some other airbed options that are listed in post #3 here that may be much better quality/value choices than Sleep Number/Select Comfort.

The best place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial which I linked in my last reply which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists (based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

If you would also like to include some local options in your research that you can try in person before a purchase then if you let me know your city or zip code I'd be happy to let you know about the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area.

Phoenix
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