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Searched for: morgongava
08 Nov 2020 13:46
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey Heathereast,

Welcome to the Mattress Underground :) ! Thanks for your question.

I'm hoping to get some advise about what is the best solution for our 2.5 year old Ikea mattress. We bought the Morgongava king size which is a 7.8 inch Dunlop latex, 85% natural and 15% synthetic. There is no other 'comfort' layer. We bought it because there is no other option locally for a latex mattress and we heard about the longevity of latex. We had been in a cycle of buying expensive but inferior mattresses that quickly broke down. We both have a problem with improper lower back support and lower back pain in the morning if we sleep on our backs. At first the latex mattress seems pretty good although a bit hard we didn't want to mess with the support. We had a 3" memory foam topper once that killed my back!


Here are a few questions for you, Heathereast: what other mattresses did you have prior to your Ikea Morgongava natural latex mattress and what were some of the qualities that you liked about them? As this is your first natural latex mattress, you may have found that Dunlop has a bit of a firmer feel than you both are used to. When you say that you "both have a problem with improper lower back support and lower back pain in the morning while back sleeping", is this the case with all of your mattresses or only the Ikea? Have either of you reviewed the other's spinal alignment while laying on your side on the mattress?

My husband is initially a side sleeper but often ends up on his back, 250lbs. I am pretty strictly side sleeper and 140lbs. There is definite crush especially on my husbands side and a noticeable amount on my side. I've had two hip surgeries and the pressure point on that hip is so bad I wake up in pain every night and on the other side I have shoulder pain so I end up on my back often and then wake up with back pain so bad I can hardly move for a while. My husband occasionally complains of a sore back or shoulder in the morning. The amount of depression on his side of the bed is concerning.


It sounds is though you both have experienced a good deal of pressure point frustration, Heathereast. It must be terribly difficult to rest comfortably when all of your preferred sleeping positions lead to pain. The Morgongava natural latex mattress's 7.8" thickness and medium-firm dunlop density suggest it may be better suited for individuals more of an average height/ BMI. The "definite crush" you mention on your husband's side may indicate that his muscular build and 250 lb. weight surpasses the mattress's performance abilities from a long-term durability standpoint. Have you contacted Ikea and discussed your pressure point discomfort with them from a product replacement conversation?

We weren't aware of the requirements for the support for the latex and just put it on the box spring we had. It is a wire grid box spring. We also didn't initially rotate as we didn't know we should and a king size latex mattress in a small room is not a small thing!
My question is can we save this mattress? We paid 1100.00 for this and we would hate to toss it after only 2 years.


A wire grid box spring is similar to an innerspring except it generally uses fewer and stronger coils or torsion springs and is used under an innerspring mattress to support it, protect it from sudden shocks that can damage the innerspring, and to help its ability to respond to weight, providing additional pressure relief or improve alignment. While you could place a latex mattress on a box spring, the weight of a latex mattress could result in bended springs and mattress sag.

I've done some research thanks to this site and the list of manufactures listed on this forum (by Phoenix I believe) in Ontario who make latex beds. I thought I'd ask here first for ideas of what should we do...is this mattress too thin for my husbands 250lb of solid muscle to start with? and we should just start over?....or do we just need a proper base and a comfort topper of latex or some other material?


You may consider contacting any of these Ontario area TMU Trusted Members for their thoughts on either how to improve your current Ikea mattress or what next steps they would recommend:


Is it crushing down because it isn't 100% natural latex?


Both natural latex and blended latex are very high quality materials and well regarded for their durability properties. The fact that your mattress incorporates an 85% natural and 15% synthetic blended Dunlop latex shouldn't be the problem. Without seeing the compressions of your mattress, I cannot speculate on what may be causing the "crushing down" you describe.

Whatever we get is going to be manufactured site unseen and shipped probably from Ontario to Nova Scotia so a recommendation on a manufacturer would be welcome too! Ikea does also have some sort of latex topper available but I don't want to buy it if there is another better option. And at this point I will chuck it and start over if that's the better option. HELP! PLEASE!


You may also ask the Canadian-based trusted members for their recommendation of a mattress manufacturer closer to your area, they would be happy to share that information with you. Good luck with your research and looking forward to more updates as you decide which way to go.

Thanks,
Sensei
05 Nov 2020 06:12
  • Heathereast
  • Heathereast's Avatar
I'm hoping to get some advise about what is the best solution for our 2.5 year old Ikea mattress. We bought the Morgongava king size which is a 7.8 inch Dunlop latex, 85% natural and 15% synthetic. There is no other 'comfort' layer. We bought it because there is no other option locally for a latex mattress and we heard about the longevity of latex. We had been in a cycle of buying expensive but inferior mattresses that quickly broke down. We both have a problem with improper lower back support and lower back pain in the morning if we sleep on our backs. At first the latex mattress seems pretty good although a bit hard we didn't want to mess with the support. We had a 3" memory foam topper once that killed my back!
My husband is initially a side sleeper but often ends up on his back, 250lbs. I am pretty strictly side sleeper and 140lbs. There is definite crush especially on my husbands side and a noticeable amount on my side. I've had two hip surgeries and the pressure point on that hip is so bad I wake up in pain every night and on the other side I have shoulder pain so I end up on my back often and then wake up with back pain so bad I can hardly move for a while. My husband occasionally complains of a sore back or shoulder in the morning. The amount of depression on his side of the bed is concerning.
We weren't aware of the requirements for the support for the latex and just put it on the box spring we had. It is a wire grid box spring. We also didn't initially rotate as we didn't know we should and a king size latex mattress in a small room is not a small thing!
My question is can we save this mattress? We paid 1100.00 for this and we would hate to toss it after only 2 years. I've done some research thanks to this site and the list of manufactures listed on this forum (by Phoenix I believe) in Ontario who make latex beds. I thought I'd ask here first for ideas of what should we do...is this mattress too thin for my husbands 250lb of solid muscle to start with? and we should just start over?....or do we just need a proper base and a comfort topper of latex or some other material? Is it crushing down because it isn't 100% natural latex? Whatever we get is going to be manufactured site unseen and shipped probably from Ontario to Nova Scotia so a recommendation on a manufacturer would be welcome too! Ikea does also have some sort of latex topper available but I don't want to buy it if there is another better option. And at this point I will chuck it and start over if that's the better option. HELP! PLEASE!
08 Oct 2018 08:12
  • SotY
  • SotY's Avatar

The Cushion Firm 12” UD was their # 5 level @ 28 ILD...at a quick glance, it looks like the 12” bliss and the 12” UD Eurotop models are roughly comparable. Both have 8” of poly (BB is 2.17 lb vs 2 lb) base foam, both have 3” of Talalay latex at different firmness/softness choices. Both have 1” quilted Zippered cover with the wool missing from the BB,

Generally, attempting to find something that is exactly the same from another manufacturer is often a frustrating and futile exercise especially if you are trying to do this on your own. There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every individual layer and component in a mattress (including the cover, FR barrier, any quilting material, and of course all foam layers) will affect the feel and response of every other layer and component both above and below it and the mattress "as a whole" so you would need to carefully asses the design and the specs of each mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials (Talalay in this case, blended) in order to determine if that the mattress in its entirety will be a good "match" for you or your daughter in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP(Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) This is especially important when you are trying to approximate the mattress you are considering with others that use the same type of materials and components which may be just as durable but have a different design or firmness level that may be completely unsuitable for you or your daughter to sleep on.

I would tend to keep the focus on the needs for your daughter when buying this bed as she is and will be the primary user. The needs of adults are much different than children’s sleeping needs. Generally, for growing children (3 years or older) you’d want something more in the “medium” to “medium-firm” range, due to their epiphyseal plate and postural formation. 28-32(medium range) it is usually recommended for the upmost 3" layer, which would be quite sufficient to ensure good posture and support. (I'd also keep in mind that Dunlop also has a firmer feel than Talalay of the same ILD.) One of the advantages of getting a multi-layered component style system mattress is that you can add or exchange layers as your child grows. If and when they need a softer comfort layer in their "sleeping system” you can also add a softer topper to any firmer children’s' mattress when they get older and develop more adult proportions . 12” thickness mattress you are considering is generally not needed for a growing child (they typically won’t need more than 6” or so of layers, and when the needs change if it becomes necessary then you can add some thickness or softness with either another layer inside a new cover or add a softer topper to the mattress.

If you’re looking for something using polyurethane foam, make sure that it has at least CertiPUR-US certification for the foam. If you desire something more “natural”, but want to keep the cost as low as possible, there are many options out there, but I’m most familiar with some offered by out trusted members.


Thank you Phoenix for such detailed answer!

You are correct that Matrand tends to be rated firm by most sleepers. It uses a little under 5" of synthetic latex on top of about 2" of 1.7 lb polyfoam so there are no obvious weak links that would compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress relative to more "average" weight ranges (lower 200's or less). If you are considering an exchange for another IKEA mattress you can read a bit more about their mattresses in post # 1 & 3 here and you may wish to look into their newest lineup 8” MAUSUND NR latex line (85% NR & 15% SBR Latex) that replacing their Morgongava.


I went to Ikea and they accepted my return without any problems. And also they issued regular store credit refund for the mattress so I actually didn't have to buy another mattress from them and could spend it on anything. But after checking Mausund I liked how it "felt" and decided to give it a try. Unfortunately after bringing it home and unwrapping it very strong smell appeared. To describe it the best I would say it reminds me trips to petting zoo with my daughter :) I'm not sure if that comes from latex or from wool but it is very strong and even after 24 hours of leaving mattress uncovered in bedroom with opened window it didn't change much. When covered with waterproof mattress protector the small is less noticeable and I actually spent one night on it. I'm not gonna lie, it's very comfortable. Little bit firmer than our current BB Bamboo Bliss but definitely not as firm as Matrand. I'm just afraid that smell will not go away because I remember seeing some Morgongava review saying that it had bad smell even after couple of months. I will probably give it a week or two and see how it goes. If smell won't go away I can take it back but getting almost $1k as store credit is not very good idea because there is no other mattress model I would consider getting from Ikea.
06 Oct 2018 13:57
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi SotY.

So I contacted BB asking what would be closest current model replacement for Bamboo Bliss and they directed me toward Dreamfoam Ultimate Dreams EuroTop Latex Mattress saying it's the same model but I know it's not. It was also available back in 2013 and somebody explained the differences between BB and Dreamfoam very clear and I decided to get BB based on that.


The Cushion Firm 12” UD was their # 5 level @ 28 ILD...at a quick glance, it looks like the 12” bliss and the 12” UD Eurotop models are roughly comparable. Both have 8” of poly (BB is 2.17 lb vs 2 lb) base foam, both have 3” of Talalay latex at different firmness/softness choices. Both have 1” quilted Zippered cover with the wool missing from the BB,

So my question is what full size mattress should I get for my daughter (and my or my wife when there will be need to co-sleep) that will be most similar to BB 12" Bamboo Bliss?


Generally, attempting to find something that is exactly the same from another manufacturer is often a frustrating and futile exercise especially if you are trying to do this on your own. There is more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every individual layer and component in a mattress (including the cover, FR barrier, any quilting material, and of course all foam layers) will affect the feel and response of every other layer and component both above and below it and the mattress "as a whole" so you would need to carefully asses the design and the specs of each mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials (Talalay in this case, blended) in order to determine if that the mattress in its entirety will be a good "match" for you or your daughter in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP(Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) This is especially important when you are trying to approximate the mattress you are considering with others that use the same type of materials and components which may be just as durable but have a different design or firmness level that may be completely unsuitable for you or your daughter to sleep on.

I would tend to keep the focus on the needs for your daughter when buying this bed as she is and will be the primary user. The needs of adults are much different than children’s sleeping needs. Generally, for growing children (3 years or older) you’d want something more in the “medium” to “medium-firm” range, due to their epiphyseal plate and postural formation. 28-32(medium range) it is usually recommended for the upmost 3" layer, which would be quite sufficient to ensure good posture and support. (I'd also keep in mind that Dunlop also has a firmer feel than Talalay of the same ILD.) One of the advantages of getting a multi-layered component style system mattress is that you can add or exchange layers as your child grows. If and when they need a softer comfort layer in their "sleeping system” you can also add a softer topper to any firmer children’s' mattress when they get older and develop more adult proportions . 12” thickness mattress you are considering is generally not needed for a growing child (they typically won’t need more than 6” or so of layers, and when the needs change if it becomes necessary then you can add some thickness or softness with either another layer inside a new cover or add a softer topper to the mattress.

If you’re looking for something using polyurethane foam, make sure that it has at least CertiPUR-US certification for the foam. If you desire something more “natural”, but want to keep the cost as low as possible, there are many options out there, but I’m most familiar with some offered by out trusted members.

Listed in alphabetical order some of our Trusted Members who carry safe and healthy mattresses for growing children or mattresses are very well suited for children for the lower budget ranges: (I also listed slightly higher budget mattresses as by using the TMU coupon these may be options you’d wish to consider. )
Arizona Premium Mattress’s Latex Bed for Kids with a great price point.
Flexus Comfort also has a great dual-comfort mattress suitable for children using 100% natural Dunlop latex core
Latex Mattress Factory Naturale Mattress is an option suitable for children.
Luma Sleep’s Base Luma Mattress in its firmer version
My Green Mattress with the Natural Escape (a bit higher budget range but you can use the 125 Off Mattress (Code: TMU125) offered to TMU members)
Pure Echo ( One version has no foam at all and is just an innerspring with a natural fiber cotton/wool comfort layer and the other includes latex.)
Quality Sleep Shop specializes in innerspring mattresses for children
Sleep EZ Roma Latex Mattress with dual side configuration (Medium-Plush and Firm Feels)
Sleep On Latex Pure Green Mattress good price point mattress suitable for children.
Although for a higher budgets Cozy Pure’s two-sided Natural Latex Mattress using Certified Organic Cotton and wool on top of 6” natural Latex core, maybe worth considering
As far as other recommendations for mattresses for children, Post #2 here includes links to most of the better forum posts and topics about mattresses and children and includes some suggestions and guidelines and to some good quality/value options as well.

Any of Ikea's mattresses are worth considering? I know Matrand is too firm even they describe it as medium firm. I can still exchange Matrand for different model but can't return it (that's their mattress policy) so it would be a plus but if they don't have anything better I can just try to sell it and get mattress from other source.


You are correct that Matrand tends to be rated firm by most sleepers. It uses a little under 5" of synthetic latex on top of about 2" of 1.7 lb polyfoam so there are no obvious weak links that would compromise the durability or useful life of the mattress relative to more "average" weight ranges (lower 200's or less). If you are considering an exchange for another IKEA mattress you can read a bit more about their mattresses in post # 1 & 3 here and you may wish to look into their newest lineup 8” MAUSUND NR latex line (85% NR & 15% SBR Latex) that replacing their Morgongava.

It seems to me that you have a little bit of thinking to do but I’d make sure to run everything through your personal value equation and what is most important to you and your daughter.

Good luck and I’ll be interested in learning about your progress.

Phoenix
17 Jul 2018 04:09
  • Cloud999
  • Cloud999's Avatar
I recently purchased the Zenhaven mattress. It's still within the refund window; I'm not 100% sure we'll keep it. This seems to be a very well-made product and I do like some of the design features (the flippable sides, the zoned comfort layers, the handles). However, so far, I'm finding the "plush" side not supportive enough and the "firm" side not quite soft enough (or something!) to relieve hip and shoulder pressure when I'm on my side. They're sending out a topper; this should make the "firm" side more comfortable. The company service seems to be very good, by the way.

I'm 5'11, ~200 lbs, and often sleep on my stomach; my wife is smaller and often sleeps on her side. She finds this mattress satisfactory (but not quite as comfortable as a much less expensive Ikea Morgongava). While "flippable" is attractive, in theory, I think in the end it might be better to know your needs and your options, then get a mattress designed top-to-bottom to meet those needs. Your Mileage May Vary. I'm not suggesting you should rule out the Zenhaven, just be realistic about the ability of 2 sides (plush/firm) to cover all needs.
11 Jun 2018 13:01
  • strangerousanya
  • strangerousanya's Avatar
Back with a quick update. I did a ton more reading here and ultimately determined that I wanted a "firmer" natural latex mattress (or possibly blended, but not all artificial latex), but I wanted to be able to try it in person from the store I was buying from. Given our limited budget, the easiest option was Ikea, so we headed there this weekend. I *loved* the Morgongava, but sadly it was out of stock, has been discontinued, and it's replacement (the Mausund) is not due in until July.

Instead, my husband convinced me to try the Myrbacka memory foam, pointing out that it was the most like our old, beloved mattress (also Ikea memory foam), and we ended up buying it. I know the Ikea memory foam is lower density than recommended, but at almost half the price of the Morgongava, if we get 6-7 years out of it, I'll be more than happy. (Our old mattress gave us 8 good years and 1 not so good year before we replaced it.) And with a 365 day return policy, if we determine in the next few months that it isn't working, we can take it back when the Mausund natural latex is available.

I know one night is not enough to say for sure, but last night was the first night in months I haven't had any back pain when I woke up! (The Purple is *crazy* soft in comparison.)

I will update again after the return with Purple is complete, if anyone is curious about that part of the process. (I sent the request today but haven't heard back yet.)
12 Mar 2018 14:54
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi kakhea.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)

I’m happy that the information here is helpful and is making things a bit clearer for you.
Thanks for summarizing at the end of your posting the few things to keep in mind …sometimes I have to dig across many postings to understand the larger picture for any particular poster.

There are 3 models available: MATRAND) latex/poly ($), MYRBACKA) latex/unknown, and ($$) MORGONGÅVA) natural latex ($$$). All were medium/firm, but we liked the cheapest one, MATRAND, the most (page 9). All were medium/firm, but we liked the cheapest one, MATRAND, the most (page 9). What's up with that? How can three mattresses that all supposed to be med/firm from the same company feel so different!?


You are correct that all 3 Ikea mattresses you've tested are rated as medium firm , but generally speaking, there are no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings even across products from the same manufacturer where accuracy is not a priority. As all layers work together, how much you’ll sink an what you feel on a specific mattress depends on your body specifics and also on the overall layer combination, including the encasement and the bedding being used and also as the thickness and softness are interrelated and this may also may alter the firmness rating as it applies to you.

The issue of firmness ratings is even more complicated as different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

IKEA being themselves, I can't tell which type of latex it is, and am having trouble getting the specifics. I read somewhere that the MATRAND has 1.7 lb density polyfoam as the core, which worries me in terms of durability. I went into this search thinking I would either DIY with this forum's help/using guidance from a trusted member here, or at least make an educated choice about something less customizable. After going to try the beds, I feel like know less than when I started! I am tempted to buy the IKEA bed with potentially poor(er) materials just to get it over with.


Martrand Latex 7” uses 5” of synthetic Dunlop latex (A forum search on Myrbacka and on Matrand (you can just click the links) will bring up more information about them (and some pictures as well)

While the Dunlop latex would be a better quality material, and the polyfoam would be “on the edge” of being better quality, I have received feedback in the past on the inconsistency and poor quality of assembly of many Ikea mattresses, so it is possible that you run into this when you tested this item. I would not rush into any purchase just because it is convenient or because you wish “to get it over with”. The way you sleep will affect the way you live and it is worth the time investment to get things right.

The most important part of the "value" of a mattress purchase is how well it matches your specific needs and preferences in terms of PPP and this can be very different for each person. Regardless of the cost or quality of a mattress ... if a mattress isn't a good match for you and you don't sleep well on it then it would have little value to you regardless of how well any other person or group of people may sleep on it. When you are looking at a local mattress then careful and objective testing is the most reliable way to assess this.

Outside of the suitability of a mattress ... the quality and durability of the materials are the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase. If a mattress is "perfect" at first but uses lower quality materials that can soften, break down, or compress too quickly relative to the price you paid and you lose the comfort and support that was the reason you bought it in the first place then it would also have little value to you. Don't forget that the loss of comfort and/or support is the main reason that you will need to replace a mattress and this isn't covered by warranties (which only cover manufacturing defects). In the case of latex I would want to confirm the type and blend of the latex (unlike polyfoam or memory foam where the density is the most important "quality" spec).

We went today to De Mattress in Miami and tried a 9" dunlop mattress. They say it's processed at their own plantation in India. It was three layers, glued together. The sales woman said it was 65/75/85 and if they were to use Talalay numbers it would be 32/34/36. Does this make sense? I found it to be bouncy and when I sat up I didn't sink as much as I do on memory foam but I still sank down.


The answers to your questions about ILD may be a little bit more complex and more than you would want to know at this time. Suffice to know that that ILD in latex has variance across the surface (usually measured with a 6" thick layer) differs from manufacturer to manufacturer (may be using different testing protocols) The accuracy of the rating depends on the source and their knowledge of latex foam and on whether the ILD is a real measurement or just a guess or "mistranslation" from other methods. Dunlop latex that is accurately rated as being in a certain range (it's never a single number in reality) will also feel firmer to most people than Talalay of the same ILD range unless you only sink into the layer exactly 25%.

If you are testing a mattress locally then none of this really matters because what you feel when you test a mattress will be more important than any ILD or comfort specs although it may be more important in an online purchase if you know the specific and accurate ILD of all the layers in a mattress you have tested locally (as well as all the other information and specs that will play just as big a role in how a mattress feels as ILD) and you are looking to make an online choice that is somewhat comparable to what you have tested locally.

How do I tell if all latex is not for me after all? The MORGONGÅVA only had the one solid layer of natural latex-- is that the problem? Would more layers help? (I assume 'yes,' logically, but I feel like I'm drowning in information & possibilities). Before yesterday, I was leaning heavily towards Flexus Comfort or Latex Mattress Factory. I feel really lost!


As far as adding more layers …In the large majority of cases ... 8" - 9" of latex is easily enough to include the combination softer layers (or sometimes sections) for pressure relief and firmer layers for support that most people of average or even higher weights would need. In some cases ... lighter weights or people that sleep in "flatter" sleeping positions, have slimmer less curvy body types, or who prefer a firmer mattress will do well with even 6" even though there is less "room" to design in different layers in the mattress. Thicker mattresses can also use firmer materials because thickness and softness are very related and work together. These are all good questions to ask the manufacturer or retailer of a mattress so they can discuss the differences between the different options they have available in terms that are more specific to the layers they use or options they provide.

Unfortunately there is no “magic bullet” when it comes to your own needs and preferences .... “suitability” is the most important part of the "value" of a mattress purchase is and how well it matches you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) which "translates" into how well you will sleep on the mattress. Only you can feel what you feel on a mattress or decide which one you would most likely prefer and that you believe is likely to be the best match for you based on your preferences and testing on different materials and types of mattresses (using the testing guidelines in the tutorial post) or in the case of an online purchase your more detailed conversations with an online manufacturer or retailer so they can help "talk you through" the options that may be best for you (see post #2 here) There is also more about the different ways to choose the most suitable mattress that can help you identify and minimize the risks involved with each of them in post #2 here . There would be little value in a mattress purchase where you don't sleep well on the mattress regardless of the quality of the materials or the price of the mattress.

Outside your personal testing one best way to get a more accurate idea is to deal with better manufacturers or sources who will usually list their latex more accurately as they are much more familiar with their own mattress designs and materials than anyone else and they can use the information you provide them about your body type and sleeping positions, your preferences, your history on different mattresses, and the results of your local testing to make suggestions based on the "averages" of other customers that may be similar to you. The more accurate and detailed the information you provide them the better you will help them to help you make the best possible choices out of the options they have available. Of course the options you have available with each retailer or manufacturer (or with a particular mattress) and your ability to exchange layers or the mattress itself or use other forms of fine-tuning after your purchase or the return policy may also be an important part of your personal value equation or to offset the risk that can go with any online purchase. Both Flexus Comfort and Latex Mattress Factory along with other members of this site would qualify as "better" or more accurate sources. They are both our Trusted Members here which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency.

So hopefully this wasn't too complex even though it's never as simple as I and most others would want it to be.

Phoenix
12 Mar 2018 09:27
  • kakhea
  • kakhea's Avatar
Phoenix,

I have been searching the topics & forum post on this site for days now. First of all, kudos for creating an awesome resource!

Now, onto my question: with the help of the files here, I narrowed down my choice to latex, or latex hybrid. Yesterday, my husband and I went to IKEA to try their latex/hybrid mattresses, since it's the only place around me I knew would definitely have them. There are 3 models available: MATRAND) latex/poly ($), MYRBACKA) latex/unknown, and ($$) MORGONGÅVA) natural latex ($$$). All were medium/firm, but we liked the cheapest one, MATRAND, the most (page 9). What's up with that? How can three mattresses that all supposed to be med/firm from the same company feel so different!?

My original plan was to go all latex for a mattress, but now I'm worried about buying online. The MORGONGÅVA was REALLY hard, so much so that it hurt both of our backs. The MYRBACKA was okay, but still too firm. The MATRAND was perfect for him the second he laid down, and after a couple of minutes of laying on it, it was decent for me.

IKEA being themselves, I can't tell which type of latex it is, and am having trouble getting the specifics. I read somewhere that the MATRAND has 1.7 lb density polyfoam as the core, which worries me in terms of durability. I went into this search thinking I would either DIY with this forum's help/using guidance from a trusted member here, or at least make an educated choice about something less customizable. After going to try the beds, I feel like know less than when I started! I am tempted to buy the IKEA bed with potentially poor(er) materials just to get it over with. :(

How do I tell if all latex is not for me after all? The MORGONGÅVA only had the one solid layer of natural latex-- is that the problem? Would more layers help? (I assume 'yes,' logically, but I feel like I'm drowning in information & possibilities). Before yesterday, I was leaning heavily towards Flexus Comfort or Latex Mattress Factory. I feel really lost!

Any advice? Thanks!

---
Reference: www.ikea.com/ms/en_US/pdf/buying_guides_fy15/Mattresses_bg.pdf

Him: 5'7'' // ~180 // (M) // back-to-side sleeper // sleeps hot
Me: 5'10' // ' ~150 // (F) // back-to-side sleeper
Budget: ~$1500, King
24 Jan 2018 09:55
  • MattressToGo
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I knew there was something I forgot to add in my previous reply. Ikea does not list any "safety certifications" on their web site for the latex used in this mattress. But if the latex is still supplied for this model by Mountain Top it would be Oeko-Tex and/or TFI-Germany certified.
23 Jan 2018 16:48
  • MaryD
  • MaryD's Avatar
Thanks Jeff. This is helpful. I do not see any third party certifications listed online for the Morgongåva. Does this mean that the mattress is not certified and if not there is really no way to be sure of it’s safety, regardless as to whether they advertise “Natural”? I am not fussy about Organic or not but I do want a reasonable level of assurance that there are no/low VOCs.


Thanks
23 Jan 2018 15:34
  • MattressToGo
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Hey MaryD,

I'm not Phoenix, but I think I can help with some of your questions.

I understand that the MORGONGÅVA is 85% natural latex but are there any harmful VOCs with this mattress?


"Harmful" has no exact definition in a situation such as this, but what I think your concern may be would be for testing for harmful substances and the like. There's a commonly linked post here that speaks about this directly and I'll copy it here for you as I think it may be helpful to you:

There is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications such as Oeko-tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, C2C, and CertiPUR-US in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are also some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.

The only reliable way to assess the "safety" of different materials in more general terms is based on lab tests and the certifications they have for harmful substances and VOCs (regardless of whether they are organic or natural or synthetic) so that you have some assurance than the VOCs are below the testing limits for the certification. If the materials in a mattress or the mattress itself has a reliable "safety" certification then for most people they would certainly be "safe enough" ... regardless of the type of material or the name of the manufacturer on the label.


I have read that most 100% Natural Latex advertised is actually a blend of natural rubber and synthetic latex aka ”styrene butadiene rubber" (SBR) which are two petroleum based chemicals, and are dangerous to health.


That unfortunately would not be accurate information you received. If a mattress is advertised as 100% Natural latex, it means that the latex (rubber) component is from the hevea tree and not synthetically derived. There are of course small amounts of other accelerants, antioxidants, gelling agents, etc., added to complete the finished foamed rubber latex piece. If a latex is listed as Blended, the latex (rubber) part would be a mix of natural and synthetic latex. Blended latex is still able to pass very strict safety certifications such as Oeko-Tex 100, level I (for infants and children), and would generally be considered to be a quite "safe" material as far as that testing goes.

Are there other stores in the Toronto area that sell a comparable (or superior) product for a reasonable price that we can try beforehand and have a good comfort guarantee?


Use the search feature here on the forum and type in Toronto and I know you'll get some results, as the greater Toronto area has been discussed quite a bit here on the forum. I'm 5 hours from Toronto, so I don't have any specific recommendations for you in that area.

I hope that information helps!

Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator
Beducation / Mattress To Go
23 Jan 2018 09:06
  • MaryD
  • MaryD's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,
I am interested in the ikea MORGONGÅVA latex mattress for my daughter as it’s very reasonably priced and it’s available for us to try before purchase. I am weary about buying a mattress online that I am not able to try beforehand and that does not have a very good comfort guarantee as our bodies behave very differently after spending 8+ hours on a mattress in a state of sleep than awake in a showroom for 30 min. I understand that the MORGONGÅVA is 85% natural latex but are there any harmful VOCs with this mattress? I have read that most 100% Natural Latex advertised is actually a blend of natural rubber and synthetic latex aka ”styrene butadiene rubber" (SBR) which are two petroleum based chemicals, and are dangerous to health. Is this mattress safe for kids? Are there other stores in the Toronto area that sell a comparable (or superior) product for a reasonable price that we can try beforehand and have a good comfort guarantee?

Thanks so much for your help!
18 Jan 2018 13:00
  • MattressToGo
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Hi zzeuss,

The last I recall, the Myrbacka uses continuous pour Dunlop from Mountain Top, which would be Oeko-Tex certified. But suppliers can change quickly, so I may not be correct on that. But most latex you find would pass Oeko-Tex standards. As you’re aware, Ikea doesn’t list certifications or suppliers on their site for this model.

Regarding odor with Ikea mattresses, from an earlier post in this thread:
There is more about the smell of latex in post #2 here but the latex in your mattress has been certified by Oeko-Tex for harmful substances and VOC's so at least you have the assurance that the smell and offgassing isn't harmful although some people can still be sensitive to it and you aren't the only one that has mentioned the smell of one of the Ikea latex mattresses ( see here ).


Not all VOCs have odors, and just because something has an odor doesn’t mean it is a VOC.

There’s a common reference post listed ere regarding things that are “safe enough”. Here it is:

There is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications such as Oeko-tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, C2C, and CertiPUR-US in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are also some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.

I hope that helps you out!

Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator
Beducation / Mattress To Go
18 Jan 2018 08:51
  • zzeuss
  • zzeuss's Avatar
Hi,

sorry to hijack the old topic... We are thinking of getting Myrbacka (latex) for our kids and you're mentioning these mattresses are certified by Oeko-Tex.. and wanted to know if you are indeed referring to Myrbacka mattresses which is made of 100% synthetic materials..
We know the MORGONGAVA is made of 85% natural and 15% synthetic.. but it does smell even the ones from the display room..
We wanted to know if Myrbacka is safe for the kids.. :)
Your input is greatly appreciated.. thank you!
14 Nov 2017 14:08
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi buddhafest,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I am in the process of buying a new mattress and have been constantly thinking about the Morgongava as it's the most resonable priced of natural latex mattresses available.


While you may personally have an affinity for the Morgongava, and it certainly can be at a more "affordable" price point, I'd like to clarify a few points in your post, specifically that the latex used in the Morgongava is natural (it is a blend of 85% natural / 15% synthetic), and that it is the "most reasonably priced" latex mattress (there are quite a few similar options available online, some using 100% natural latex and even being component-style systems, such as a few listed in post #3 and #4 here ). ;)

Phoenix
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