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Searched for: Penny Mustard
27 Oct 2018 17:14
  • Sweet Dreams
  • Sweet Dreams's Avatar
Penny Mustard sells a unique high quality 'Platinum Dreams' mattress lineup and are extremely transparent regarding their construction clearly detailing the specs of each layer. The only thing that prevented me from buying a mattress from them is that they have no money back guarantee, but instead offer a one year one time replacement option which gives you 75% of your purchase price to apply towards another model. Glad that your choice is working out so well for you! :cheer:
27 Oct 2018 09:14
  • Maxxpower
  • Maxxpower's Avatar
Just wanted to provide an update that this mattress has been great 3 years later. The ability to flip and rotate keeps it like new. Nice and cool. No back issues since (knock on wood).
Would buy another one despite the high cost.

Platinum Dreams

Thanks for the help on this forum, I came back to research pillows, so i figured the least I could do is provide an update that may help others.
16 Nov 2016 07:58
  • Arial36
  • Arial36's Avatar
Hi,
I did what I thought was a lot of research before finding your site. I am impressed with all the detail and time that you have put into it. My husband and I have had a foam mattress for about 11 years (I don't recall the brand; it was purchased at a PM Bedroom Gallery [now Penny Mustard] store in Wisconsin. It was memory foam but with a quilted mattress top. I found it to be very comfortable, but the heat was a problem for my husband. Thus began our quest for a new mattress. We liked the comfort of memory foam but were looking for the cooling factor. So far we have tried a Tuft and Needle. The cooling has been wonderful, however, it is a little too firm for both of us. Many of the mattresses that we are considering next appear to have similar firmness, which is making me leery of trying another one. I am looking for suggestions. Our budget is probably around $1000.

I also appreciate that you suggest local products where possible. I don't know if any local products would fit what we are looking for, but we live in mid-Michigan.

Thanks for any advice!
08 Sep 2015 18:20
  • Maxxpower
  • Maxxpower's Avatar
Hi Phoenix,

Thanks for the reply. I am glad you feel that the materials are premium and there are no obvious weak links.

Option 2 . www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-King-Marsala-Mattress-Plush/MARS66-PL-1406/ItemInformation.aspx is what we both felt was the right mattress.

My only other concern is that while this PLUSH mattress provided good PPP now, how much will it change in the next 6 months and will I regret not getting the medium which also felt good but slightly firm when laying on the side.

I am hoping that because of the premium construction of this mattress, the comfort layer would not "settle causing spinal misalignment as this is a relatively soft mattress.

In your experience, do many people regret going too soft or too firm with a full latex mattress?

Thanks for your help!
07 Sep 2015 19:50
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Maxxpower,

We have decided that we are willing to spend more on a 2 sided mattress as our current one is just about unusable due to the giant craters in it (single sided). We have found a reputable local retailer and wanted to hear what the forum has to say about these options;


There is more about the pros and cons of one sided vs two sided mattresses in post #3 here . While a one sided mattress that meets the quality/durability guidelines here and that doesn't have any lower quality materials or weak links can certainly make a durable choice ... a two sided mattress would last longer than a similar mattress with a similar support system that used the same comfort layers on only one side of the mattress as long as you flip and rotate it on a regular basis (see post #2 here ).

There is also more about the 3 most important parts of "value" of a mattress purchase in post #13 here which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on suitability, durability, and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you).

Option 1:. www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-Kin...ItemInformation.aspx This is an all latex 2 sided mattress. The link shows its construction which appears to be very well made. This mattress felt firm but comfortable.

Option 2: www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-Kin...ItemInformation.aspx This is an all latex 2 sided mattress. The link shows its construction which appears to be very well made. This mattress felt very nice. It is a slightly softer version of option 1

Option 3: www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-Kin...ItemInformation.aspx This mattress has a spring core as opposed to being solid latex. It felt the most comfortable out of the 3 but it was massively thick.


I would keep in mind that the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress) or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more accurate than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or if you can't test a mattress in person then your own personal sleeping experience (see mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here ).

Outside of PPP ... the most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability and the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label. That's one of the reasons that It's always refreshing to see a manufacturer like Clare Bedding that is transparent about all the materials and components in their mattresses and all of these mattresses use high quality and durable materials and there are no lower quality materials or weak links in any of them so if any or all of them are a good "match" for you in terms of PPP and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are important to you then they would certainly be well worth considering.

- Concerned about the 1" thick layer of wool over the latex. Will this flatten out and get lumpy and hard over time


Wool is one of the best temperature regulating materials in the industry and while it will compress by about 30% of it's thickness over time and the initial compression will be more where you sleep most on the mattress ... with only an inch of wool this won't have any meaningful effect on the comfort or support of the mattress and it will also even out over time as you sleep in different areas of the mattress and flip the mattress over on a regular basis so it's certainly not something that I would have any concerns about.

- Concerned about getting the right firmness (side sleepers)


Your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) and personal experience will always be the most reliable way to know whether any mattress is a good "match" for you in terms of firmness, comfort, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences).

There is also more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of comfort and PPP in post #2 here that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for once you actually sleep on your mattress in "real life".

- Concerned about heat retention in these mattresses (sleeping hot)


While it's not possible to quantify the sleeping temperature of a mattress for any particular person with any real accuracy because there are so many variables involved including the type of mattress protector and the sheets and bedding that you use (which in many cases can have just as significant an effect on temperature as the type of foam in a mattress) and on where you are in the "oven to iceberg" range and because there is no standardized testing for temperature regulation with different combinations of materials ... there is more about the many variables that can affect the sleeping temperature of a mattress or sleeping system in post #2 here that can help you choose the types of materials and components that are most likely to keep you in a comfortable temperature range.

Wool is among the best temperature regulating materials and latex in general is the most breathable and temperature neutral of all the foam materials so it would be very unlikely that someone would have any temperature regulation issues with a mattress that has a wool quilted cotton cover and latex comfort layers.

- Concerned about the longevity of option 3 as some of the foam is not latex


The 2.5 lb polyfoam in the third mattress you linked is a very high quality and durable material which are well above the minimum guidelines that are suggested in the quality/durability guidelines here so there wouldn't be any cause for concern or weak links in the mattress in terms of durability.

Phoenix
07 Sep 2015 17:53
  • Maxxpower
  • Maxxpower's Avatar
Hi, I have already learned a lot from researching and lurking on this forum. Our bad experience with our last mattress has pushed me to spend more time selecting a quality mattress..
We have decided that we are willing to spend more on a 2 sided mattress as our current one is just about unusable due to the giant craters in it (single sided). We have found a reputable local retailer and wanted to hear what the forum has to say about these options;

Option 1:. www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-King-Marsala-Mattress-Medium/MARS66-MED-1406/ItemInformation.aspx This is an all latex 2 sided mattress. The link shows its construction which appears to be very well made. This mattress felt firm but comfortable.

Option 2: www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-King-Marsala-Mattress-Plush/MARS66-PL-1406/ItemInformation.aspx This is an all latex 2 sided mattress. The link shows its construction which appears to be very well made. This mattress felt very nice. It is a slightly softer version of option 1

Option 3: www.pennymustard.com/Platinum-Dreams-King-Orchid-Mattress-Medium/ORCH66-MED-1406/ItemInformation.aspx This mattress has a spring core as opposed to being solid latex. It felt the most comfortable out of the 3 but it was massively thick.

My concerns for all of them;
- Concerned about the 1" thick layer of wool over the latex. Will this flatten out and get lumpy and hard over time
- Concerned about getting the right firmness (side sleepers)
- Concerned about heat retention in these mattresses (sleeping hot)
- Concerned about the longevity of option 3 as some of the foam is not latex

We have spent a fair amount of time on all of them and they all feel pretty good and provide spinal alignment.
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks!
25 Oct 2013 19:49
  • JDM
  • JDM's Avatar
First off thanks for the great information on this site! Been reading for a couple weeks as I plan for mattress shopping. Went to Ken Michaels and Penny Mustard in Milwaukee yesterday. Tried a number of mattresses and types with my girlfriend. Although each store I found tried to push us to higher cost options we learned a lot. Based on great feedback here on Beloit Mattress we are heading there tomorrow. spoke to Ryan there on phone today and he was nice as can be. Looking forward to this shopping now.

Question is based on the following what are best options at Beloit Mattress?
- both of us are back and side sleepers
- she has some back issues
- both seem to like the medium support mattresses we tried
- we both like plusher comfort
- I'm concerned about heat while sleeping so want to avoid that issue

Thanks!

Jim
14 Oct 2013 20:03
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi ShopperGirl,

You know...I really think the difference is in the thickness of the layers. I found a mattress at Penny Mustard that felt really, REALLY good. But rather than three, three-inch layers like the Savvy Rest, it has one six inch soft talalay layer in the middle,and one inch of medium talalay on the top. It is a very squishy soft mattress--just like I like.


You're very right that the thickness of each layer along with the softness of each layer and other foam specs as well such as compression modulus and others are all part of how all the layers and components of a mattress interact together to create the feel and performance of a mattress. You can see a few of the factors involved in post #2 here but learning all the technical aspects of mattress design and theory can be a long learning curve and in the end still won't tell you any more about which mattress is more suitable for you than your own personal experience. Some of this is quite counterintuitive in many cases.

I think that the actual soft latex would be fairly close but there is a significant difference in the layer thickness and design. The Platinum Dreams says they use 24 ILD which would be fairly close to the ILD of the soft Talalay latex that Savvy Rest uses in their soft layers as well although latex that is made by different manufacturers isn't always directly comparable.

All of this is fairly technical though and the most important thing is your own personal experience and finding a way to sleep soundly over the course of the night :)

Phoenix
14 Oct 2013 19:09
  • ShopperGirl
  • ShopperGirl's Avatar
You know...I really think the difference is in the thickness of the layers. I found a mattress at Penny Mustard that felt really, REALLY good. But rather than three, three-inch layers like the Savvy Rest, it has one six inch soft talalay layer in the middle,and one inch of medium talalay on the top. It is a very squishy soft mattress--just like I like.

Also, the ILD in their soft must be much softer than the SR soft ILD. When I scrunch the sample of the Savy Rest soft talalay in my hand, it is much "firmer" than when I squish a sample of the soft talalay used by Penny Mustard. Oh, well...too late now. I already made the wrong choice. (I didn't know Penny Mustard even carried mattresses until AFTER I purchased this one and started more aggressively reading this forum to find answers. That's when another person mentioned the Penny Mustard stores. Dang! Wish I had known about them sooner!!)

Thanks for the info. If the suggestions from Phoenix don't work at all tonight, I may just bite the bullet and switch out the medium talalay layer for a soft. And, unzipping the casing has helped a little...
14 Oct 2013 10:27
  • ShopperGirl
  • ShopperGirl's Avatar
Thanks, dn. That makes a lot of sense.

I had thought about exchanging the middle layer to soft (they don't have ultra soft; I wasn't even aware that was available.) But I figure if I exchanged the bottom layer, then I would put the existing medium tal on the bottom, then have the new soft layer in the middle and the current soft layer on top. That would involve only one exchange. But, to your point, switching out only the middle layer would cost $175, as opposed to nearly $500.

It's not that I don't like the feel of latex; I tried a latex bed at Penny Mustard over the weekend that I loved. It's just that my back doesn't like this mattress. Extreme pain is a pretty good indcator that something is not good for/right for your body. And I loved the Natura (all latex) at the store where I bought my mattress. (The Natura was well over $4,000 and I wasn't willing to pay that.) I didn't find out about the Penny Mustard place until yesterday as I was snooping around the forums here, so it was too late. Wish I would have found that place before buying the Savvy Rest. I stayed on the Penny Mustard mattress for about 45 minutes yesterday, and my back did not "get angry" at all.

Oh well....the good news is that I am learning a whole lot about mattresses from both you and Phoenix, so thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences with me; they really are very helpful and MUCH appreciated!! :)
13 Oct 2013 15:33
  • ShopperGirl
  • ShopperGirl's Avatar
Thanks for your insights, Clawdia--especially regarding the hassles of fluffing down.

Today I went out shopping, and found a three inch "down alternative" topper. It was originally $199, but with the Columbus Day sale, I got it for $119. We'll see how that works. I was tempted to also get a polyfoam topper to put under that, too (can you say, "overkill?"), but opened the package and the smell was awful! Decided against that, obviously.

I, too, thought ILDs for talalay were very specific, but not only did the sales associate tell me that, but this afternoon I actually read the information handout they left behind, and it does say that ILDs are "ranges" and not exact. But today as I was reading through some forum topics here, I saw someone mention a store in Wisconsin (Penny Mustard) that has a latex mattress. I went on their website, and they showed EXACT ILDs for their specs (24 and 32 or 34, if I remember correctly.) They did not specify the range that Savvy Rest did.

It's funny you mentioned about your one layer having different levels of firmness. Last night, as I was trying to get comfortable, I was flopping back and forth between the right and left side of the bed, and I could have sworn the right side was firmer than the left. (I have one solid piece of foam; not two.) But, I then thought I was just making myself crazy and imagining that. I literally thought, "There is no way a single piece of foam can be two different firmness levels!" Hmmm...maybe I'm not so crazy after all. :lol: Tonight, with the new topper on, I'll see if I can tell a difference.

So, the saga (that I am getting very weary of) continues... :(
11 Oct 2013 12:58
  • DogLover
  • DogLover's Avatar
Hi, Phoenix.

I just wanted to give you an update. After spending about six hours reading through your site (great info!! :) ), and going back to the stores and also calling Claire bedding, I found that the mattess I liked is being discontinued and they don't have any in their warehouse. They (Claire bedding who, as you know, makes the mattresses for Penny Mustard) is in the process of re-vamping that mattress and making a different one which they tell me will be more firm. So, that really won't work for me, as I prefer a softer mattress and I thought that one was a a bit too firm to begin with. I asked why they were changing if the mattress they had was such a good seller (which they say it is), and he told me it was to reflect chaning market demand for a firmer mattress, which I understand.

So, I have decided to go with a "DIY" construction. That way, if something seems too firm, I can always switch out a layer. :)

Once again, thank you so much for your insights--not only in response to my post, but in the plethora of information throughout this site.

Cheers!
07 Oct 2013 20:25
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi Dog Lover,

Thank you, Phoenix, for the wealth of information in your reply to my question. :)


You're welcome ... I also realized I didn't link the foundation post in the part about box springs and foundations but it's corrected now.

Given the configuation of the Savvy Rest, and of the Penny Mustard (here's the configuration--I would not get the topper, just the mattress), which do you think would work best for me? I like matresses on the plush/very soft (yet supportive) side--NOT firm! I am 5'5.5", and weigh 122. I am intersted in pressure relief and softness in a mattress, while still getting one that doesn't "sag" or "hammock." I have read some reviews online that say the Savvy Rest tends to sag, and I think that was with the previous latex from LI, but I'm not sure.


I really have no way to know this because I can't feel what you feel or see you on the mattress. This is the part of mattress shopping where you will need to rely on your own careful and objective testing for PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) using the testing guidelines in the the basic information post here . Softness, firmness, and "feel" are also subjective and only you can know what feels soft or firm to you (regardless of how it feels for anyone else).


I also wouldn't pay much attention to online reviews (see post #13 here ). Latex is the most durable of all the foam materials regardless of which manufacturer uses it in their mattress and outside of actual defects in manufacturing (which can certainly happen on occasion) it softens less than other foam materials. Having said that ... softer versions of any material will soften more than firmer versions and the softer versions of LI's 100% natural Talalay will soften faster and is less durable than the blended Talalay especially with people that are in a higher weight range. In some cases people will often talk about a mattress sagging when in fact they have chosen a mattress that is too soft and they are sinking in too much. If Savvy Rest was having a sagging issue then every other manufacturer that used the same materials (which is a lot of mattress manufacturers) would be having the same issues ... and of course they aren't. The materials in a mattress are always more important than the name of the manufacturer who makes it.

All mattresses will go through some degree of break in period where the foams soften a little, the cover, quilting, and other fabrics stretch a bit, and any fibers will compress. This is a normal part of all new mattress purchases although latex will soften less than most other materials.

Latex is also very "point elastic" which means it contours very well to the shape of your body and compresses in the specific areas where weight is concentrated with less effect on the areas around it so it's not unusual to sink in more when you are sitting on it ... particularly with softer latex. When you are lying down it is also very supportive because it also gets firmer faster with deeper compression than other materials. You were almost certainly feeling the firmer Dunlop and the effect of all the layers firming up as they are being compressed when you sat on the latex because it would take a very high weight to even come close to bottoming out on 9" of latex with that configuration.

Phoenix
07 Oct 2013 19:08
  • DogLover
  • DogLover's Avatar
Thank you, Phoenix, for the wealth of information in your reply to my question. :)

Today I went back to Penny Mustard to try the mattress again. This time, a different sales associate spoke to me and she seemed much more knowledgeable. I asked her how long the mattress had been on the floor, and she said it had been there over two years, possibly longer. She told me that the biggest complaint they get from customers about that mattress is that it is a LOT harder/firmer than what customers tried in the store. She said that was because the fire barrier needed time to soften up, and suggested to her customers that they either walk or "knee walk" across the mattress several times when they get it to soften it up.

Does that sound right to you? She showed me a sample of the Miliken Paladin fire retardant and, frankly, it was cottony-soft so I am a bit confused as to why it would need to be "softened up." The sales associate, who said she had never felt the fire retardant sample before, seemed equally perplexed. We both laughed that if it got any softer or lighter it would float. :lol:

Although the mattress at Penny Mustard felt slightly cushy, it was still a bit firm. I am worried that a brand spankin' new one may be too firm. However, I also felt the Savvy Rest configuration was a bit too firm. (It was medium Dunlop, medium Talalay, soft Talalay.) The guy at Savvy Rest said they just stopped getting their latex from Latex International and are now getting it from Radium and it is something called "Vita Talalay." The Savvy Rest guy told me the Radium Talalay is a bit softer than the Latex International Talalay, although he did not give me ILD numbers.

Given the configuation of the Savvy Rest, and of the Penny Mustard ( here's the configuration --I would not get the topper, just the mattress), which do you think would work best for me? I like matresses on the plush/very soft (yet supportive) side--NOT firm! I am 5'5.5", and weigh 122. I am intersted in pressure relief and softness in a mattress, while still getting one that doesn't "sag" or "hammock." I have read some reviews online that say the Savvy Rest tends to sag, and I think that was with the previous latex from LI, but I'm not sure.

I also prefer the feel of all Talalay, but in the SR, that would be too expensive for me. The reason I liked the all Talalay at some of the stores I tried is because it feels much softer to me than a combo. Even with just the foundation layer in Dunlop, I can feel the that harder layer while on the SR. The other thing with the SR, is that I could swear when I sit down on it (with the M-Dunlop, M-Talalay, S-Talalay confirguration) that I can feel myself sink down an "hit bottom." The sales associate told me I was just hitting the Dunlop layer, and not the actual platform/slats, and said I just had a "hyper-sensitive body" and picked up minute differences that most people don't.

I have been researching latex mattresses for over a year now, and the more I learn, the more I am convinced latex is a wonderful choice. But getting the RIGHT latex that is comfortable yet affordable is quite a different undertaking. :lol:
06 Oct 2013 21:07
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi DogLover,

A forum search on Penny Mustard and Platinum Dreams (you can just click both of these) will bring up more information and comments about both of them.

(1) When I asked the sales associate where the latex was sourced from (EG: Latex International, etc.), she said she didn't know and that "they won't tell us." ("They" being the Michigan company that makes their mattresses. When I asked what company in MI made their mattresses, she said, "I don't know." Oy.) So, although they say it is "all natural," I assume that could still mean it is a blend. If so, is that really such a bad thing? (I'm new to this whole latex mattress thing, so forgive my ignorance!)


Platinum Dreams mattresses are made by Clare Bedding which is the Restonic Licencee in their area. Restonic sources its Talalay latex from Latex international as far as I know.

Latex International makes both 100% natural Talalay and blended Talalay. The blended comes in ILD's of 14, 19, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, and 44. the 100% natural comes in firmness ranges from N1 to N5. If the ILD's are correct it would indicate that the Talalay latex they use is blended which many manufacturers call "natural" vs "all natural" which refers to the 100% natural ( see here ). It certainly gets confusing because if a manufacturer said that their mattresses contained all "natural" latex it can be read to mean that all of the latex in the mattress is "natural" (which is blended) while if they say all the latex is "all natural" this would indicate that the latex is 100% natural. The terminology is confusing and often leads to manufacturers and retailers confusing which is which.

(2) I asked what the "Miliken Paladin" fire retardant barrier was comprised of and, again, she responded with "I don't know." After some research it "seems" to me as if this is a low toxicity (although not completely non-toxic" substance (silica, if I am not mistaken). However, I'm not a scientist, so I don't know what I don't know. :unsure:


I would consider a viscose/silica inherent fire barrier to be non toxic. you can read more about this type of fire barrier in post #2 here and the post it links to.

(3) Penny Mustard a "365 day comfort guarantee." Now, a comfort guarantee sounds nice, but I am always a bit concerned with companies with such liberal return policies; I often wonder if they just repackage the mattersses and send them out again. (A former boyfriend worked in a furniture store that did such returns (NOT Penny Mustard--he worked at a store that has since gone bankrupt) and he told me the sales reps were told to say that returned mattresses were sent to "outlets," but in reality they put them back into circulation. I asked him how that could happen because I thought that wasn't legal and his response was, "Who's gonna police it?" Yuk! So, that has always made me a little leary of working with companies that allow people to return mattresses. BUT..that could just be m paranoai based on my former friend's comments. Adding to my paranoia, of course, is PM's requirment that you buy a $60 mattress cover because, "We can't take the mattress back if it has any soil or stains on it. "It must look like new condition," according to the sales associate. Hmmm.....


It would be illegal to repackage the mattress and sell them again as new and while it's possible (and some stores have been caught doing just that) ... it's not likely IMO that they are one of them. They are usually sold to liquidation outlets who will often sell them as "scratch and dents" etc. The requirement for a mattress cover and no stains of any kind is so that employees don't have to handle a mattress with stains and the health issues that could be connected with this. Of course a stain could also affect their ability to re-sell the mattress to a liquidator or clearance store after it's been sanitized. The cost of comfort returns are built into the cost of the mattress and in some cases it can result in people who are more careful in their mattress choices and don't need a comfort exchange paying for the exchanges for people who test less carefully.

I really liked the feel of the Penny Mustard mattress better than the Savvy Rest, but am wondering about the quality of the PM mattress. They also put their mattress on a box spring. I asked the sales associate if it was okay to put it on a slatted platform bed, and she looked shocked and said, "Oh, NO! A slatted platform offers NO support for the mattress! You need a SOLID platform--or a boxspring like this." When I told her that my research indicated that a slatted platform with the slats no more than two inches apart was best, because it allowed for circulation under the mattress, she disagreed. Yet, their "boxspring" (which was a few wood planks on the bottom and very hard steel / wire on top? seemed to me to be the same concept as the slatted platform. (Right now I have an old spring mattress and traditional box spring so, again, all of this is new to me.)


A mattress is only as good as its construction and the quality of the components and materials inside it. Both of these use latex which is a high quality material regardless of the type of latex used. Savvy Rest has a more flexible design because it allows for re-arranging or exchanging layers which can fine tune the mattress after a purchase in many ways while with the Restonic you are limited to the actual design of the mattress. The Platinum Dreams is two sided and two sided designs (that are flipped regularly) are more durable than a similar one sided design. With layered latex mattresses with a zip cover you can also replace just a single layer though if the top layer softens before the rest. Savvy Rest uses either organic Dunlop or 100% natural Talalay while the Restonic appears to use blended Talalay. You can read more about the different types of latex in post #6 here and more about blended vs 100% natural Talalay latex in post #2 here .

I really liked the feel of the Penny Mustard mattress better than the Savvy Rest, but am wondering about the quality of the PM mattress. They also put their mattress on a box spring. I asked the sales associate if it was okay to put it on a slatted platform bed, and she looked shocked and said, "Oh, NO! A slatted platform offers NO support for the mattress! You need a SOLID platform--or a boxspring like this." When I told her that my research indicated that a slatted platform with the slats no more than two inches apart was best, because it allowed for circulation under the mattress, she disagreed. Yet, their "boxspring" (which was a few wood planks on the bottom and very hard steel / wire on top? seemed to me to be the same concept as the slatted platform. (Right now I have an old spring mattress and traditional box spring so, again, all of this is new to me.)


You can read more about the different types of support systems that are generally used or appropriate for different types of mattresses in the foundation post here and the two other posts it links to in the second paragraph. Box springs are generally used for innerspring mattresses although there are some latex mattress manufacturers that use them under a latex mattress (generally thinner) because the box spring can change the feel of the mattress and is designed as part of the sleeping system. With thicker latex mattresses it's generally not necessary and in most cases even desirable. A box spring that flexes can change the feel of a mattress vs a solid non flexing foundation or platform bed that doesn't flex. You can also read more about a solid platform vs a slatted surface in post #10 here . It sounds to me like their "box spring" may be a wire grid type which is a semi flex (not a box spring with actual springs which which flex) and you can see my thoughts about these with an all latex mattress (with latex in the bottom layer of the mattress) in post #10 here .


@dn,

7. It's surprising they add a chemical fire barrier at all, assuming you're correct about that. They use organic ticking and organic wool, and natural talalay. The wool would often be used to achieve fire barrier, and otherwise a mattress like that would often be sold as a premium 'organic', 'all natural', 'without chemicals' mattress at a higher price.


Wool needs to be needle punched and used in a certain amount and way to pass the fire code and it's often just as easy (and less costly) for a manufacturer to use an inherent fire barrier which gives the flexibility to either use less wool or use it in different ways. The viscose/silica fire barriers aren't a "chemical" fire barrier and are non toxic. You can read more about wool fire barriers in this article that is written by someone that I respect highly and is very knowledgeable about passing the fire regulations.

Both of these mattresses use high quality materials and there are no obvious weak links in their designs.

Phoenix
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