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Searched for: Paramount
31 Mar 2021 08:05
  • Sensei
  • Sensei's Avatar
Hey shawnfs,

Welcome to The Mattress Underground :) ! Thanks for your question.

First of all, thank you for putting this website and forum out there. They have been immensely helpful. My partner and I are looking for a new mattress. I am 5' 8" and 185 lbs.; she is 5' 1" and 110. We are both side sleepers. I sleep very hot, and our dog also usually sleeps with us, so a cool mattress is paramount. Neither of us is a particularly light sleeper, so motion transfer is not very important.


Thanks for your kind words regarding the website and forum! They are much appreciated! Thanks too for including your personal stats , as they play a key role in understanding the materials and mattress designs that may be better suited for your personal preferences.

Our current mattress is an IKEA Hesstun. I don't remember what firmness level and it doesn't appear to be on the tag, but I think we probably would have gotten medium-firm. We've had it for six years and it's been fine. Occasionally I will wake up with minor low back pain if I really sleep in (10 hours or so), but it dissipates as soon as I get up. We've both slept on some really terrible mattresses before without any pain or soreness issues, so I don't think either of us is particularly sensitive that way, at least thus far.


Good to know that your current IKEA Hesstun has served you well thus far. You both are fortunate to not have any particular sensitivities as that can make mattress shopping a little more challenging for anticipating materials may trigger an allergic response.

I came into the process without too many strong preferences (other than temperature), but as I've been researching I've become intrigued by mattresses with all-natural materials and no polyfoam. I like the idea of a latex or latex hybrid. The wrinkle is that my partner is vegan, so wool is out for us, and most of the "all-natural" mattresses out there seem to use wool at least as a fire barrier.


Yes, wool is often blended into the covers or other materials of a mattress for use as a natural fire barrier. There are latex/ latex hybrid options out there that use other materials besides wool. For example, Avocado uses a fire barrier protectant of natural hydrated silica in its Vegan mattress.

With that in mind, I've gravitated toward the Avocado Vegan hybrid. I'm hesitant because many people seem to think the mattress is too firm, even with the pillow topper, and especially for a petite side sleeper like my partner.


The Avocado Vegan Hybrid Mattress/ Standard model features 3" of dunlop latex as a comfort layer (14-19 ILD/ soft) over a Quantum Edge Elite Combi-Zone pocketed coil support core of 5 zones. Adding the optional pillow top provides another 2" of dunlop latex (14-19 ILD/ soft) for a total thickness of 13". Combi-Zone coil systems do provide a somewhat firmer feel to a mattress's support and are often designed with back/ stomach sleepers as well as larger BMI individuals in mind. Your petite partner may find it too firm for her preferred side sleeping position but until she can try it or something similar in a showroom setting, there is no way to predict that with certainty.

I've looked a couple other vegan latex mattresses like the one FloBeds makes, but they seem to run $3000 or more for a queen. I would prefer to spend $2000 or less.


Thanks for considering a purchase from expert trusted member FloBeds ! I regard them quite highly in terms of product quality, latex expertise, and customer support post-sale. While there is a price difference, Flobeds Organic Vegan mattress is a 9" Talalay latex mattress, a more expensive design than Avocado's 3" of dunlop latex Hybrid model. The cool aspect of FloBeds Vegan mattress is that it is a split construction, allowing you each to choose both the comfort and support you each prefer. Generally speaking, if you want to go with an all latex mattress, you can get in for $2,000 or less if you choose a support core of Dunlop latex.

My question is this: other than the Avocado Vegan, are there any other vegan, all-natural latex or latex hybrid mattresses, under $2000 for a queen, that we should be looking at that might be better suited for a small side sleeper? I might be talked into doing a DIY but I'm hesitant to take that project on if I don't have to. Thanks in advance.


You may want to check out TMU's trusted members in the Latex/ All Latex Mattresses category for quality, high-value all natural and latex hybrid mattresses. Keep in mind while researching the Vegan category that you will find mattresses that are technically speaking "vegan", as they do use cruelty free components but they don't necessarily carry a "Certified Vegan" credential issued by vegan.org . According to vegan.org's site , only 3 manufacturers are paying the annual fee to carry their certification for particular mattress models, those being Avocado, Brentwood Home, and Naturepedic. Hope this helps some and good luck with your research ;) .

Thanks,
Sensei
25 Mar 2021 13:33
  • shawnfs
  • shawnfs's Avatar
First of all, thank you for putting this website and forum out there. They have been immensely helpful.

My partner and I are looking for a new mattress. I am 5' 8" and 185 lbs.; she is 5' 1" and 110. We are both side sleepers. I sleep very hot, and our dog also usually sleeps with us, so a cool mattress is paramount. Neither of us is a particularly light sleeper, so motion transfer is not very important.

Our current mattress is an IKEA Hesstun. I don't remember what firmness level and it doesn't appear to be on the tag, but I think we probably would have gotten medium-firm. We've had it for six years and it's been fine. Occasionally I will wake up with minor low back pain if I really sleep in (10 hours or so), but it dissipates as soon as I get up. We've both slept on some really terrible mattresses before without any pain or soreness issues, so I don't think either of us is particularly sensitive that way, at least thus far.

I came into the process without too many strong preferences (other than temperature), but as I've been researching I've become intrigued by mattresses with all-natural materials and no polyfoam. I like the idea of a latex or latex hybrid. The wrinkle is that my partner is vegan, so wool is out for us, and most of the "all-natural" mattresses out there seem to use wool at least as a fire barrier.

With that in mind, I've gravitated toward the Avocado Vegan hybrid. I'm hesitant because many people seem to think the mattress is too firm, even with the pillow topper, and especially for a petite side sleeper like my partner. I've looked a couple other vegan latex mattresses like the one FloBeds makes, but they seem to run $3000 or more for a queen. I would prefer to spend $2000 or less.

My question is this: other than the Avocado Vegan, are there any other vegan, all-natural latex or latex hybrid mattresses, under $2000 for a queen, that we should be looking at that might be better suited for a small side sleeper? I might be talked into doing a DIY but I'm hesitant to take that project on if I don't have to. Thanks in advance.
16 Oct 2020 10:25
  • Mystic
  • Mystic's Avatar
Hello -
Does anyone have experience with the iGravity (from Paramount Sleep)? I'm looking for "plush but supportive" with minimum- or no memory foam - while avoiding actual visit to a store :(. Macy's carries this so at least it's returnable! Thanks!
18 Feb 2020 12:51
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
Thank you for the additional information. I asked Paramount about the poly foam density of the mattress and they state it is 1.95. Is that density low enough to where it would cause problems in a couple of years? I'm not sure about the specifics on the quilting foam, but I could try to get more details from them if that makes a difference.
18 Feb 2020 08:21
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
Hi Ken Hightower,
Thank you again for your research on the Paramount Nature's Spa that I purchased. In a previous post you mentioned:

I was able to find the specs online and based on what I learned I can tell you that the mattress will get softer and softer over time until you lose the support part of the mattress. The base core is just poly foam, then a layer of micro coils, then latex, then a bunch of more poly foam over the top and in the quilted cover. These top layers will continue to soften and then you will get the same impressions that most other mattresses get. The latex benefits are rendered useless because of how far down they are in the mattress build. This is just my opinion so if you keep the bed make sure you read the warranty carefully and keep it on file because you may need it in a couple of years.


I reviewed the content at the link you provided, www.paramountsleep.com/natures-spawww.paramountsleep.com/natures-spa . I read about the layers that you mentioned. Is it the type of layers or the order in which they are positioned that will lead durability / softening issues? Or is it the quality of one or more the layers that will cause issues? Sorry to bother, but just curious about what causes this mattress to have durability issues. Thanks.
05 Feb 2020 11:25
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
Thank you for your insights. I’m glad to know that you have an adjustable mattress that could work well for us. We’re going to find a local store to try latex mattresses as you suggested. Would you mind sharing the link to where you found the specs to the Blackberry Farms Paramount Nature’s Spa mattress?
05 Feb 2020 10:20
  • MattressToGo
  • MattressToGo's Avatar
Hey Austin:

I'll do my best to answer a few of your questions that are in my wheelhouse. Much of what you're asking for is to have someone pick out /differentiate quite a few different mattresses for you, which isn't what I do. But maybe some others on the forum could offer a few insights to assist you in those areas.

I have been looking at several companies in the bed in a box space just mainly for seemingly more affordability and great return policies. I have not been able to sleep well due the current state of my current mattress so finding the “right one” is important to me.


If you're very specific about comfort, testing something out in person may be of primary importance to you. Many brick and mortar stores also offer return policies, although testing in person can alleviate the need for this. "Seemingly more affordability" is a good statement, as some of the largest boxed bed companies may "seem" to offer more affordable products, but when you analyze the quality of componentry, they actually don't compare well to many of the non-boxed products, as well as some of the smaller boxed-bed products. It's paramount that you learn about the quality of componentry to make an accurate analysis of a product. Be sure to study the mattress shopping tutorial offered on the TMU website to assist you with that.

I did go to a nearby Mattress Firm and try some of the “S” brand beds and laid on several just to get an idea of the types that I may like and different options there are. I seemed to gravitate towards the Hybrid beds the most. The two I seemed to like in the store were the Tempur Pedic Pro Adapt Hybrid medium and the Sealy Silver Chill Hybrid Firm.


If you've read a bit here on the site, you'll already realize that unfortunately most of the models of the "S" brands don't tend to offer the higher-quality, higher-density flexible polyfoams that tend to be more durable. Again, it's important that you learn about every layer of material in any mattress you're considering, and at a minimum acquire the density of the foam. That way you'll be able to make an informed and educated choice, or at least logically compare items.

As for a "hybrid", I wouldn't compare/contrast mattresses based upon that term, as it's become so diluted by salespeople and mattress brands as to have little meaning. I recently wrote a Beducation blog post on the genesis of the hybrid terminology that you may find interesting. Again, focus more upon componentry than nomenclature.

I saw someone post some specs of those two and aside from price being pretty steep on those models, the comfort layers seemed to use lower quality foams and 14-16 gauge coils. I am not sure how long they would last.


The innerspring unit isn't generally the weak link within a mattress. You should primarily focus upon the comfort materials.

Information on us: Me and my Girlfriend are about 5’4 and weigh around 200-225. She sleeps mostly on her back or stomach and I am a combo sleeper but mostly on my back and stomach as well.


Sleeping prone (on your stomach) generally requires a surface comfort on the "firmer" end of the spectrum, or at least something that doesn't allow for too much sag that would exaggerate your forward lordotic curve of your low back. This doesn't mean you need to sleep upon a brick, but I'd suggest avoiding something too heavily padded or too plush on top. Back sleepers usually need something that allows for some contour of their seat and shoulders, but not so much that they're sleeping in a hammock. In general, look for something with a good support unit that helps promote a more neutral alignment, then something using "just enough" padding to get the job done, and with your specific mass concentration make sure the padding material is higher density and not overly plush in nature for increased durability. How plush is of course subjective, and these are general sleep ergonomics recommendations.

I sleep a little warm but I’m not sweating unless it’s the summer in KY as I live in a second floor condo that can get pretty warm.


Overall sleeping temperature depends upon a myriad of things and there's quite a bit of detail about it here on the forum. The items closest to your skin will have the most dramatic impact for temperature and humidity control. Good sheets that wick moisture and breathe well are important, as well as a breathable mattress pad. Softer mattresses will tend to sleep warmer than harder mattresses, as all material insulate to an extent, and the more you're "in" a mattress, the more you're insulated and the less surface area you have exposed outside of the mattress for heat exchange. Keep the relative humidity in your condo low and of course do your best to keep the room temperature in the mid-60s or so. Industry claims of "cooler sleep" tend to be exaggerated quite a bit by salespeople and take a bit of truth and stretch it to the point that you think you're going to need a heating pad to stop from freezing to death. A bit of skepticism is warranted, but not cynicism.

She does have rheumatoid arthritis but mostly just in her wrists and knees. However we both have back and neck pain and need something with a solid support.


I'm sorry to hear about the arthritis. I wish there was a mattress that could cure this, and if there was, I'd be on it as well! Taking note of how your girlfriend holds her wrists at night (some people flex at quite severe angles while sleeping) can assist with that (some even wear soft wrist braces when sleeping to stop from flexing too much). Sleeping prone can exacerbate knee pressure, so avoiding that "weak" sleeping posture can be assistive. It all depends upon the origination of the pain in the knee and the level of flexibility in the joint that might cause distress while sleeping. Back pain usually arrives from environmental reasons (previous injuries, level of strength and flexibility, weight, etc.) but can be exacerbated by a poor mattress and a poor (prone) sleeping posture. Neck issues are also quite diverse, but a properly fitted pillow promoting a more neutral alignment with a new mattress can do wonders.

I prefer a more firm mattress as well.


Ding ding. You're on a good track provided the componentry is a good quality and it's not like the floor (see my previous comments above).

I have been looking at Brooklyn Bedding Aurora, Signature and Bloom models and the people there seem to say to go with the aurora. I am worried that the coil gauge is only 16 but they are 8” pocketed coils.


As I mentioned previously, the innerspring unit within the mattress is generally not the weakest link. The Signature uses the Ascension 6" in 13 gauge. The Bloom and Aurora use the Quantum in 8" that is 16 gauge along the perimeter (with a different geometry) and 13 gauge in the center. I believe this will all eventually transition over to the in-house Ascension coils from what I remember at Market. Regardless, focus upon the foam quality, and I would tend to give particular focus to the advice in a phone call with the manufacturer, as they will tend to have the best experience with what works best with their previous clients with dimensions/issues similar to yours.

I have also looked at Wink Bed, Purple Hybrid, Nest Alexander Hybrid and Bear Hybrid. The only local manufacturer near me is Bowles Mattress and they can get pretty pricey but I have not had the time to make into their store to talk to them.


You can most likely find the current specifications for these boxed-bed products on the forum. I don't have current listings. Maybe someone else more knowledgeable with these products can be assistive. I'm not completely familiar with your local mattress company, Bowles. I have run across them before in some of my readings, and if I recall they did seem to offer some items using very high quality materials. But you'd want to investigate that directly with them. They seem to be transparent about materials.

I was hoping the lovely people here could help shed some light and offer some recommendations on what you think would be best or what route to go. I know only we could determine what’s best for our PPP but I feel a little lost in the minutiae of it all.


Hopefully some others can chime in and give more complete details to your other questions. The best advice I can give is for you to sit down and read through the mattress shopping tutorial on this site, specifically focusing upon mattress componentry and what constitutes a higher-quality padding material. I don't think you've read through this completely, as you seem to be focusing more upon the innerspring unit than the comfort material. Once you have that as a reference (not memorized), you'll be in a much better position to make an informed decision.

Good luck!
05 Feb 2020 08:59
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
Thank you for your insights. The Paramount mattress came with a topper as part of its sleep kit system. I thought about purchasing a different topper but was concerned about the interplay between a new softer topper and the mattress. I’m glad to hear that might be potential solution though. But as you said, that won’t solve the durability issue. It’s a fairly expensive mattress so we may come out cheaper if we return and buy a different mattress.
04 Feb 2020 08:38
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
I apologize if this subject is more suitable for the general forum. I'm unable to post there. Please feel free to move the message if better suited there. I was required to select an expert in order to post. I selected Sleep EZ because I'm aware that Sleep EZ makes a mattress where each individual can customize their side of the mattress which might be ideal for my wife and I. I am interested in Sleep EZ thoughts on a customized mattress for our situation .

My wife and I recently purchased a Paramount Nature Spa's mattress (before I knew of the information on this site). My wife gives the mattress about 9 out of 10. She highly rates the mattress because it is eliminating her back pain. It replaced a 10+ year old Serta that was sagging and causing both of us back pain (but for her to a much more significant degree).

After reading a bit on this forum, I became concerned about the durability of the mattress. I made a post , and it was confirmed that we could lose the supportive benefits over a short period of time. Furthermore, I'm not very happy with the comfort (it's too firm for me). Understandably, my wife is fairly indifferent to the comfort because the support layers (with perhaps some help from the comfort layer) are nearly solving her back pain. She said it has about the same comfort when going to sleep (although with a different feel) as the old Serta.

We're seriously considering returning the Paramount mattress but my wife is concerned if we'll ever be able to find the same back pain relief in another mattress. My wife is also very constrained on time. So, we really need the next mattress purchase to be the right one.

Based on our differences in rating of the Paramount mattress (I probably rate it a 5 of 10 b/c of the comfort issues), a split mattress option may be ideal for us. Could my wife choose layers in one her side that could replicate the support of the Paramount Nature's Spa and continue to provide the back pain relief? What would those layers look like? Here's the link to photos of the mattress and topper tags.

I (5' 10" 140 lbs) seem to like a very soft comfort layer(s) similar to our old Serta. (I've attached the mattress tag photo to this post for the old Serta.) We're both primarily side sleepers while occasionally rolling over to our back. Would I need different layers? If we go latex for comfort layer, would a low ILD using Talalay or continuous pour Dunlop be recommended?

I think we've only owned innerspring mattresses in the past but definitely open to trying a latex mattress or other types. Given the information above and my
post here, are there certain types of mattresses we can narrow down to? Is there anywhere in Memphis we could try a good sampling of mattresses? Due to limited time, my wife will only be able to make one outing to try mattresses locally.
31 Jan 2020 12:46
  • Arizona Premium
  • Arizona Premium's Avatar
Thank you for your questions and I will do my best to help you. First thing I would do is contact the company and ask for a trial extension and tell them if they don't give you another 30 days then you will need to return it. I'm sure they will give you another 30 days but make sure you get it in writing or an email.
Once that is done try to find out the complete specs of the mattress you have and respond back. Without knowing the complete construction I cannot answer many of your questions. Perhaps if you contact Paramount directly they might be able to tell you. You can also take a picture of the Law Tag which tells you what is inside the mattress. Post it here so I can see it.
30 Jan 2020 12:10
  • logicg8
  • logicg8's Avatar
Hi,

I'm new to this forum. I've spent quite a bit of time reading several posts and articles including this post , this post , and how to find you perfect mattress including the overviews. The wealth of information is incredible and invaluable. I'm very grateful to all of those who put time into building this site and providing this information. Unfortunately, I purchased a mattress prior to learning this great information. We have only another week to return the mattress if we're not happy. I'm hoping someone can give me a bit of guidance on what to do now. Here's my situation:

Background Leading to Mattress Purchase
My wife and I were sleeping on a Serta which we purchased about 10 years ago. The Serta is an innerspring unit with 61% polyurethane foam and single-sided pillow top. I really like the "feel" of the mattress due to the soft comfort layer. I'm 5'10" @ 140 lbs. and primarily sleep on my side although I occasionally sleep on my back. My wife is also primarily a side sleeper (5'5" and 175 lbs). After 10 years, I was starting to notice some back pain but only during bending over a certain way or sitting on a bench and leaning on my knees for 5+ minutes. My wife though was having back pain even standing. It was more intense in the mornings and faded as the day progressed.

For our anniversary, we stayed at Blackberry Farms and slept really well. We attributed it to the bed although in hindsight it could have been due to being on vacation, relaxed yet active during the day. We learned that Blackberry sold the bed although it was quite expensive.

Mattress Purchase
When Blackberry had a Cyber Monday deal, we jumped on the offer. Although it was still very expensive, we were willing to pay for what we hoped would give us the sleep we experienced there and would be a very high quality mattress. We briefly considered getting just the mattress (as they sell that) but then they recommended to get the sleep kit which included a mattress topper and pillows to replicate the bed at the farm.

Mattress Initial Assessment
When the bed arrived, we were excited but it seemed much firmer than we remembered. Perhaps, the bed at the farm was a few years old and had been broken-in.

Mattress Current Assessment
In the first week, we had a hard time getting comfortable and it took awhile to fall asleep. In general, our sleep was not good; we woke up several times in the middle of the night and were tired during the day. Both of our back pain had improved though (especially hers). We're now in our third week, and our sleep is improving (both in terms of getting to sleep and staying asleep) although I still find it much less comfortable than our old bed. Some nights neither one of us sleep very well on it but other nights we do better or even very good. And on a huge plus-side my wife's back pain is much better!

Next Steps?
With all that I've learned here, I'm concerned if we're making the right decision with this mattress. It surely would have been disqualified from a "feel" perspective (through steps 1 and 2 here . I'm also concerned about durability. I don't know anything about the layers including the topper and the materials in those layers (other than the Blackberry Farm site stating natural latex). I found the mattress is a Nature's Spa mattress made by Paramount. So, based on other posts about Paramount, I'm concerned if I'll be able to actually obtain any information about the construction and quality of materials.

Although things are improving, I'm wondering if we should keep it. Could we expect to find a mattress that can reduce our (especially my wife's) back pain as this one has done plus offer the comfort that I really liked on the old mattress? I worry if we return this one if that it may also take too much time to find another one... although I have some time to research my wife has less time to do so.

Instead of making a decision now, should we maybe ask for a trial period extension? The return policy is only 30 days.

Based on our profiles (BMIs noted above, side sleepers with some back sleeping, my softness preference in comfort layer, back pain, early 50s, in Memphis, prefer mattress that stays cool), is there a certain mattress type / materials that generally works best and a good place we could go to find a great mattress? We're also open to traveling, using an independent consultant, or ordering online to find a mattress that is best for us.

Many thanks in advance for reading this long post and help in providing guidance.
27 Nov 2019 20:13
  • Sweet Dreams
  • Sweet Dreams's Avatar
A quick search for the DR. BREUS BED® MONGRAM MATTRESS shows that it's constructed of "pure, natural Talalay latex and soy-based polyfoams". So unfortunately it's not a fully latex mattress, and I'd bet that it's likely the polyfoam layers which have significantly softened. I believe that the DR. BREUS BED® line was made by Paramount Sleep, but such softening isn't normally covered as a warrantable issue unless the depression is visible and can be measured to exceed their threshold with no weight on the mattress. You'd have nothing to lose by trying to file a warranty claim other than you're time, but I wouldn't be too optimistic that the softening as you've described would be covered. I hope you're able to prove me wrong and get a satisfactory result!
16 Oct 2018 06:00
  • rvsarch
  • rvsarch's Avatar
Bringing this back to the original thread, I would say that the biggest problem with selecting a mattress is the inability to really get to know a particular solution without several months of living with it and then further, not having any idea of the longevity of the materials involved. When we switched from a conventional coil mattress to the Tempur-Pedic, we were thrilled. It was a world of difference and we slept better. Then when the Poly base layer failed just a few years later, not so thrilled as there was no noticeable sag and no valid warranty claim under their terms. Replacing that base layer with firm latex, brought our sleep experience to a new height. As the original memory foam comfort layer slowly deteriorated, our sleep began to suffer. Since we had no experience with a latex comfort layer, replacing the memory foam with a similarly dense foam brought us back to great sleep. Then a rapid deterioration of the new memory foam, just one year instead of the twelve it took for the Tempur foam to fail, brought us back down to a poor sleep experience. Replacing the comfort layer with latex, proved different from the memory foam, but turned out to be an excellent solution. Seems like latex has the very real benefit of durability. To my mind, this quality is paramount, since it is so difficult to detect the slow deterioration of a mattress over a period of months or even years.
15 Jul 2018 01:37
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi thanhhiep.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :)

I just noticed your earlier posts with the two photo attachments in a different topic. I apologize! :( these were somehow lost because of the discussions in progress with other contributor members. I moved them to this thread and deleted any duplications.

We like the firmness and support of the mattress but we are not sure if the mattress has the right latex/foam components for long-term durability and comfort.


You are quite right that outside of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) ... the most important part of a mattress purchase is the quality and durability of the materials inside it but unfortunately the pictures you attached don't provide all the information about the quality of the materials in the mattress so it's really not possible to make any meaningful comments about it, identify any weak links in the design, or make meaningful comparisons with other mattresses.

You can see my overall thoughts about Paramount in post #9 here but I would also read posts #5 and #6 here which indicates that they are not transparent about some of the materials they use in their mattresses (in this case the density and thickness of the foams).

The gel that is added to some types of latex or memory foam is a phase change gel that can absorb and release heat within a certain temperature range to help regulate temperature. So-called "soy-based foam" is just polyfoam that has replaced a small percentage of one of the two main chemicals used to make the polyfoam (the polyol) with a polyol that is derived from soy oil (see post #2 here ). It would be closely comparable in terms of durability to other types of polyfoam that are the same density range. I would want to know the density of any polyfoam in a mattress.

All the latex you are likely to encounter is a good and durable material. The addition of copper used as a filler (such as TGs “Talalay mineral”) is generally used to improve the processability and heat transfer (due to the increased surface area) of the PCM. The benefits of Cu used as a filler in both memory foam and latex are more connected with its thermo-conductive properties and even though copper infused latex is advertised as having side “health benefits” (such as copper bracelets) to my knowledge these benefits have not been proven in copper infused foams. The main benefit for adding Cu to latex or memory foams would be for thermal conductivity (which generally is not an issue with latex, to begin with) so I personally would not make a priority to choose one over the other (with or without copper). Other than this if you can provide the information listed here I'd certainly be happy to make some comments about the quality of the materials in the mattress and let you know if I can see any obvious weak links in the design.

We are not sure how thick or how much density are these latex or foam and the sale person does not know either. The July4th sale is $2,847 + tax. Is this the right mattress for us with the listed specs and price?


I would ask Macy's to find out the information for you because they may have better results than you since other forum members haven't been successful in finding out the information they needed directly from Paramount (see post #2 here and the posts it links to about Paramount) and if you aren't able to find out the information you need to make an informed choice I would be hesitant to make the purchase no matter how appealing the sales price might be.

Sales are more about the illusion of saving money than they are about reality .. While it's not possible to make a blanket statement about sales because each retailer or manufacturer can be different, I would treat retailers or manufacturers that negotiate their prices or have "major holiday sales" with huge discounts as a red flag as a most of the sales are more about creating a false sense of urgency. The better manufacturers and retailers that sell good quality/value mattresses don't generally "negotiate" and they sell good quality/value mattresses every day of the year at prices that are already very reasonable. (see post #6 here ) or have "fake sales" based on the time of year or holidays (see the guidelines here and post #5 here ). In other words ... if you are dealing with a better retailer or manufacturer that sells better quality/value mattresses then one time of the year isn't really any better than another.

Just in case you haven't read it already ... post #1 here and the tutorial post here that have all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choices.

Hopefully, this gives you enough information to help with your research.
I would be interested to hear back from you to learn what you decided and I or any other Expert Member of the site would be glad assist you with any questions that you may have.

Phoenix
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