>
×

Advanced Search

Search by Keyword
×

Search Options

Find Posts from
Sort Results by
Search at a specific date
Jump to Result Number
Search in Categories
×

Search Results

Searched for: Berkeley Ergonomics
13 Sep 2022 18:15
  • Basilio
  • Basilio's Avatar
Hi Brooklyn Returnee,

Thanks, Basilio, for your very helopful rply. I've reached out to Berkeley Ergonomics and will see if I can get some more info on the longevity of their Navik with high BMI users. I'm now thinking that we might be happier with an all latex mattress maybe with a good topper. I plan to check out Birch Luxe Natural Mattress. Any insights into the Birch Luxe? It uses cashmere and wool as the comfort layer.

Glad I could help. I hope Berkeley can provide some answers for you. Keep in mind an all latex mattress can have a completely different general feel and responsiveness than the Berkley and McRoskey, and Garrison you tried, so I suggest you make another test trip to see if an all latex is something you like , it can be very comfortable and it can last you a good many years.

I took a look at the birch natural luxe, it’s an 8” layer of wrapped coils, a layer of latex of unspecified thickness/firmness, and several layers of wool and cashmere with an organic quilted top and a woven cotton cover. As thickness and firmness work together in terms of comfort-support balance I’d like to know the thickness of the latex or details of the wool and cashmere layers. That being said, cashmere and wool are becoming a more popular material in toppers and mattress comfort layers; it’s breathable, very soft and relatively durable. As the Birch is not overly expensive - it does look well made and has certified organic materials - it really just comes down to how you enjoy the ‘feel’ of the mattress. You’re narrowing the options down, and that’s great!

Let us know how the Birch felt for you and if you had a chance to try an all latex mattress.

~ Basilio
12 Sep 2022 19:43
  • Brooklyn Returnee
  • Brooklyn Returnee's Avatar
Thanks, Basilio, for your very helopful rply. I've reached out to Berkeley Ergonomics and will see if I can get some more info on the longevity of their Navik with high BMI users. I'm now thinking that we might be happier with an all latex mattress maybe with a good topper. I plan to check out Birch Luxe Natural Mattress. Any insights into the Birch Luxe? It uses cashmere and wool as the comfort layer.
07 Sep 2022 15:32
  • Basilio
  • Basilio's Avatar
Hi Brooklyn Returnee, and welcome to The Mattress Underground :)

I like the Narvik mattress from Berkeley Ergonomics. It has a wool and camel top layer. I tried a wool pillow once and within 6 months it had compressed and was no longer comfortable. The Narvik has a wool and camel top layer. Is that going to compress and flatten so that it won't be comfortable in a few years? My husband says he can live with the Narvik if my concern is alleviated.
His 1st choice is s McRoskey Modern Collection Sunset. We are both hot sleepers and I'm wondering whether a mattress with latex will be better for us.

So I want to make an informed decision. Any advice? Any answers to my 2 questions?

First, I suggest, if you have not already done so, to take a look at the mattress shopping tutorial , as well as the Mattress Specifications you need to know and the mattress durability guidelines to get a better idea of what to look for in a mattress, materials and components and see how they last over time. Any mattress you consider will feel different to different sleepers using it. This is based on the sleepers’ stats(height, BMI, sleeping position(s) and any underlying health issues) and their PPP(posture and alignment, pressure relief, and personal preferences). Thanks for providing your stats…As you are both higher BMI, and sleep on your sides and back, you need a good supportive mattress. You are shopping the correct way, by testing different types and materials to see what feels best to you both.

As for your questions: Berkley Ergonomics produced the Narvik for Jordons’ Furniture. It has as you say, a cotton with wool and camel hair cover, with 3 sets of coils (from top down: microcoils, minicoils, and Swedish pocket coils) and two layers of Talalay.

The camel/wool cover is a breathable, temperature regulating layer to allow air circulation between the sleepers and the latex. Camels (laminoids) can handle extreme temperature variations, UV exposure, moisture control. Aside from price which is a major consideration your choice for Camel hair surface based on sleeping hot is excellent. Unlike a wool pillow, which compresses with use, the quilted cover should not have noticeable meaningful ‘flattening’ with normal use for several reasons. The thickness of the top quilt usually accommodates for any compression over time of the quilt layers without detracting from the overall comfort. It will create a more superficial cradle that is not deep enough to affect comfort, then the layer of Camel hair (add linkhttps://www.berkeleyergo.com/camel-hair) is placed on top of the wool (from French plain-air sheep) used in the quilting has longer fibers and curlier which does not compress as easily and is superior in that respect to mechanically crimped wool fiber. You can read more about Camel hair advantages here camelushome.com/2020/10/12/is-camel-hair-considered-wool/ (insert link)
I would be however concerned about the ¾ inch of soft latex on top of the micro coils as at your BMI is very likely to wear out much faster for higher weight range BMIs and you may start to feel coils below. Lower density latex (which will be softer) will break down much sooner. So I’d make a call and try to find out how this mattress holds up for heavier sleepers.

Aside from being much pricier, the McRoskey Sunset, like many major retail brands, are not transparent with details and specifications of their mattresses. It is a flippable mattress with a cotton/wool cover and pocketed innersprings. Without detailed info on the components, for the price, this raises red flags for me.

Which brings me to the 3rd and most expensive choice: Garrison by Shifman. None of these mattresses are cheap (Berkeley Ergo $3420 Queen,, McRoskey $5000 for the Queen,, and the Garrison is $6800 for the Queen - and these are just the mattress prices, we'll need foundations for the McRoskey and Shifman ones)

The Shifman Garrison is not only very expensive but it is likewise light on provided specifications on the density and materials used in their components; this is also a flippable hybrid with pocketed coils, wool and cotton cover, and latex with a cashmere comfort layer. Without specific details its’ difficult to comment on this.

As to whether a latex mattress will be ‘better’ for you – if you find a latex mattress comfortable, then the answer is yes; no one can tell you which type of mattress is ‘right’ for you both, except you. Larger sleepers do have to make sure they have proper support, along with comfort, which any good mattresses sakes associate should be able to advise on, My cautions on the last two above are that they are light on providing specifics, and are not inexpensive. While they may be fine, I cannot comment on their durability or continued comfort. If you are looking at other options or are considering online ordering, you may want to look at similar offerings by the Trusted members of the site…by providing them a little info about you both they have much experience providing ideal mattresses to sleepers, and are completely transparent about the materials and details of their components to allow you to make a good choice. Many also carry a variety of foundations to complete your sleep system, or can advise on what sort of platform would be best for the mattress you choose

~ Basilio
06 Sep 2022 23:06
  • Brooklyn Returnee
  • Brooklyn Returnee's Avatar
Our old discount mattress is very dead. We reviewed the tutorials and went out looking, checking out mattresses at Scott Jordan in Brooklyn and Long's in Manhattan (we're in Brooklyn). Of course, we liked the most expensive mattresses. We are both short (5'3 and 5'5,) and so.what heavy: 218 lbs and 185 lbs). I'm a back sleeper who sometimes flips on my side. He's a side sleeper who sometimes ends up on his back. We have a queen size bed, but I'm considering going to a CA King. And, of course, we had 2 different preferences. I like the Narvik mattress from Berkeley Ergonomics. It has a wool and camel top layer. I tried a wool pillow once and within 6 months it had compressed and was no longer comfortable. The Narvik has a wool and camel top layer. Is that going to compress and flatten so that it won't be comfortable in a few years? My husband says he can live with the Narvik if my concern is alleviated.
His 1st choice is s McRoskey Modern Collection Sunset. We are both hot sleepers and I'm wondering whether a mattress with latex will be better for us.

Which brings me to the 3rd and most expensive choice: Garrison by Shifman. None of these mattresses are cheap (Berkeley Ergo $3420 Queen,, McRoskey $5000 for the Queen,, and the Garrison is $6800 for the Queen - and these are just the mattress prices, we'll need foundations for the McRoskey and Shifman ones) So I want to make an informed decision. Any advice? Any answers to my 2 questions?
07 May 2022 13:11
  • HybridQuest
  • HybridQuest's Avatar
Thanks for your thoughtful response, Phoenix.
We have been researching for quite a while. I have been reading this site and other sites. We tested several mattresses in stores, although we have only a few in our area (Central NJ). I should let you know we did place an order with Sleep EZ for the 360 Hybrid and went with their recommendations... 3" Soft Talalay for my side and 3" Medium Talalay on my husband's side. Hopefully we won't end up down that rabbit hole of trial and errors, but in case we do and need to send this mattress back I will answer some of your questions and share our experience.

We had needed a bed for guests last year and purchased a Costco Nova Form Serafina Pearl (I think in firm) for our guest room along with a new platform bed with center support and slats across. I slept on it (during a Covid scare) and found the firmness comfortable but my hips felt like they were sinking(Im only 118lbs) and my legs became uncomfortable and numb like. I found myself needing to sleep in the center of the bed for the support of the center "bar" and that didn't alleviate the problem. I also wasn't thrilled with the sinking in of the memory foam. I like to be able to reposition easily.
We need a new mattress for ourselves anyway so we decided we will move our current mattress to our guest room and get a better quality mattress for us. The new platform bed in the guest room may have been part of the problem, so i will have to take a look at how sturdy the slats are. Maybe we have to add some extra support to the platform?

At the very start of our search, with little information, we visited Shovlin Mattress. We were not happy with the older salesman, when we tried to ask questions. He quoted 3k for anything latex which was out of our price range. We tried a traditional innerspring and when my husband got on one side the other side lifted up...felt very cheap... so we left.

We went to Urban Natural in Bloomfield and met Ari, he was great. Very informative. We tried three mattresses. Berkeley Ergonomics (he called it the "Madison" model) 6 inch coils with 2 inches Talalay. The Soft side had my husband's hips sinking and the firm he said was better. I found the soft very comfortable but the springs made it feel very different...almost like a waterbed with no edge support. Naturepedic EOS "firm" coil & soft Dunlop felt good to us.. felt like what I'm used to. Naturepedic Serenade with 2 " latex felt softer than the EOS .. i think the coils may have been softer this was just ok for both of us.

At Hibernate in Bernardsville they had a Naturepedic that was way too soft for us. They had an all latex Savvy Rest that I was comfortable on a configuration of top to bottom: Med, Firm, Firm all Talalay--- the other side was Soft, Med, Firm all dunlop I thought too firm. Go figure. Also, a Harvest Green with medium Dunlop(we were told Bear mattress tried to copy the Avocado) with and without the pillowtop. Oddly the pillowtop was firmer for both of us. My husband only liked the pillowtop. I disliked that it felt like the whole bed moved on springs. I loved the feel of a bed made by OMI Organic Pedic -Lago Nouveau which was all latex and was Dunlop, but not sure of configuration ... ... but it was 7k in a Queen!

Online, we had narrowed our search to three... Luma's Natural Latex Hybrid with a 3" Talalay topper...the Nestbedding Owl and the Sleep EZ 360. I watched video reviews to try to get an idea of the "feel" of the mattresses as someone rolled around on them(lol... unscientiific... I know!
My concern on the Nest Bedding Owl was the cover had no wool, but included foam that would get indentations rather quickly and no way to replace.. . The review of Luma was described as firm and appeared so without the topper. I figured it might be good with the topper but the cover was Tencel and no wool. I couldn't find any videos of Sleep EZ mattresses, but the fact we could have different softness levels was a deciding factor and I could find no other company doing this on a hybrid in a Queen. Which was my main question in the previous post.

The shoulder and hip issues are not related to our current mattress. I have a chronic tendinitis with calcium deposits in my outer shoulder that is sore with pressure. A lesser issue is my hip which has a gluteal medius tear in my outer hip. I feel pressure in my shoulder on our current firm Stearns and Foster. Since I do sleep on my stomach about 30% of the time, I have temporarily used quilter's batting to fill in the indentation and covered with a thick mattress pad and I'm comfortable. I will have to take a look and see if i can figure out more info on it. It was a "top of the line" at time. I know it had a wool layer at the top and is a standard innerspring in Firm.
27 Mar 2022 11:19
  • Ellava
  • Ellava's Avatar
Hello all. I am 5' tall, 105 lbs primarily back sleeper with military neck, congenital kyphosis, chronic migraines, bilateral occipital neuralgia and bilateral thoracic outlet. Basically, I'm a musculoskeletal mess from the chest up. I did really well for a long time on a basic temperpedic (they don't make it anymore - basically just a block of temper material) with a 1 inch Berkley Ergonomics topper and a *old style* 02 oxygen pillow. That combo worked great for me because the temper was firm enough to keep my hips up (I can't have my hips sink ) and have great alignment without pressure points. The oxygen pillow was also soft enough and low enough to keep my neck in good alignment. Those all went caput about 5 years ago and I've been struggling since then to find something that works. I gave up on the O2 pillow with the newer (ie about 6 years ago) design/manufacturer/design and now use a Noble Pillow. It's the best I've used so far (I've bought probably thousands of pillows at this point), but it's still no quite perfect (possibly because I'm still not on the right bed).

I've tried *a lot of mattresses* - we went back to TemperPedic but they don't have the basic anymore and within 4 months with the new model we purchased the hip support collapsed and I had to get rid of it because I lost that alignment. We went to European Sleep Works and bought one bed that was a disaster (poorly made, uneven support, too much motion transfer) and the customer service was horrible, so we crossed them off the list. I'm currently sleeping on a latex mattress from a local store (The Natural Mattress Store) which is hard as a rock and not pleasant, but at least keeps my hips up. I can only sleep for about 5 hours before I wake up in pain from pressure points, but I can't sleep at all if my hips sink lower than my shoulders, so it's a trade off I've accepted for now. It's too painful to sleep on my side on the type of hard beds I need for the hip support, so once I'm done sleeping on my back I usually just lay there awake and uncomfortable. I'd love to be able to sleep on my side again.

We most recently bought the top of the line Duxianna because in the showroom the bed seemed to work, but I think the floor model was about 6 years old and the production has changed since then so the product we received is not what we tested (even after nearly a year of sleeping on it). So, that sucks and we'll have to get rid of it.

I'm not sure where to go from here. I do wonder if some kind of memory foam mattress is what will work best for me. My husband is 6'1" and 180 lb and moves *a lot* so motion transfer is a big deal for us. I was thinking of getting and XL twin for each of us with Berkeley Erognomics, but our local show room is pretty bare bones and I wasn't super impressed with their beds. Plus, they are not memory foam. I'm not sure. I'm just wondering if anyone has any thoughts/tips that would allow me to get the support for the alignment I need for my back but with the softness for pressure points and to allow me to sleep on my side, even for an hour or two.

Thanks so much,
Ally
08 Mar 2022 20:32
  • Sean.R
  • Sean.R's Avatar
I ordered the Berkeley Ergonomics wood foundation, it should arrive in 2 to 4 weeks. I like that there is only a 1 to 1.25 space between the slats, I am using the wood foundation to put a 4 inch foam mattress on.


03 Feb 2022 07:50
  • Mattrebuild
  • Mattrebuild's Avatar

Thanks for your response, Nikki. Arizona Premium Mattress's "kids mattress" stands out to me because it's so much cheaper than the rest ($359). Ditto for their hybrid ($497).

If I spent more $$ on a mattress from another manufacturer, what differences would I see?
For example, a local store sells the Whitney Lil' Joey latex mattress for $879 and the Berkeley Ergonomics K2 hybrid for $899. Those prices seem consistent with what's online, and they're competitive with the mattresses I'd listed previously from My Green Mattress. In my efforts to be an informed shopper, I'm wondering why I would spend so much more on any of those than what I'd spend on one of the options from Arizona Premium Mattress... Can you please provide any input? Thanks again.


The short answer to your question about the APM mattress is from an aesthetic standpoint the APM will not be as good as the other ones since the APM uses glued strips of foam for those mattresses but from a performance standpoint you should see no visible difference. Latex foam is an extremely durable bedding material and the glued strips will make it impossible to feel any seams.
01 Feb 2022 08:33
  • geeyoff
  • geeyoff's Avatar
Thanks for your response, Nikki. Arizona Premium Mattress's "kids mattress" stands out to me because it's so much cheaper than the rest ($359). Ditto for their hybrid ($497).

If I spent more $$ on a mattress from another manufacturer, what differences would I see?
For example, a local store sells the Whitney Lil' Joey latex mattress for $879 and the Berkeley Ergonomics K2 hybrid for $899. Those prices seem consistent with what's online, and they're competitive with the mattresses I'd listed previously from My Green Mattress. In my efforts to be an informed shopper, I'm wondering why I would spend so much more on any of those than what I'd spend on one of the options from Arizona Premium Mattress... Can you please provide any input? Thanks again.
11 Jan 2022 00:57
  • skyisred
  • skyisred's Avatar
I'm mesmerized by these euro slats by Berkeley ergonomics.
www.berkeleyergo.com/flexible-slat-system
You can adjust the 'hardness' of each slat and create your own zoning. Amazing! Why don't all stores sell these yet?!
Do you know where I could try something similar around Victoria or Vancouver, BC?
06 Dec 2021 20:48
  • urvgotti
  • urvgotti's Avatar
Hello! I ended up buying the Berkeley Ergonomics Malmo with a memory foam topper. Thanks everyone (especially ebs and Phoenix) for all your thoughts and insights. Now that I've had it for about 6 months I wanted to post a brief review. (on phone so excuse typos)

The short review is that I absolutely love it! I'm so happy with this thing. It's incredibly comfortable and my whole body feels great. No hip or shoulder pain from lying on my side. It feels no different than the first week, so even though it's only been a short while I feel like it'll stay strong. And if it doesn't, it's easy to just replace the top layer.

As for specific concerns, it doesn't sleep hot. I got a wool protector for it which I think helps. But it's very rare I wake up hot, especially compared to my old one.

The price is absolutely worth it. It really does just feel like a higher quality piece.

I have it sitting on a cheap foundation I got from sleep country, and that's sitting on a beautiful bedframe I picked up. It's well supported and there's no sag or anything.

It's great for sex too. Not too bouncy and not too sinky like thicker memory foam might be.

I'm really happy with this purchase and would highly recommend the mattress and brand. Thanks again to everyone for your help.
23 Nov 2021 14:14
  • DIYhelpPlz
  • DIYhelpPlz's Avatar
Hello everyone I'm looking into building a DIY mattress for my partner and me and I was hoping to get a little help. We're fed up trying all the bed in a box stuff and we're thinking we want to try building a latex hybrid. We tried one in a store yesterday and liked it pretty well (Berkeley Ergonomics Baltic IA soft which is basically a coil unit plus 2 inches of soft talalay with an added 1 inch talalay pillow top). We also tried their all latex bed but did not like the "dead" feel to it. The springs add some nice liveliness and responsiveness that we both like. The thing is, that mattress is pretty expensive and after doing research I know we could build something of comparable quality for far less money.

To start, I am male, 5'8, 160lbs mostly back but sometimes side sleeper and my partner is female 5'4, 150lbs all side sleeper.

One option I'm thinking might work would be a coil unit (probably the 8" L&P Bolsa unit which is supposed to be better for side sleepers) plus a 3" soft talalay layer, which is essentially what the mattress at the store was. I think we would want a stretchy cover for it but I've read elsewhere that those don't work well for DIY builds with coil units. Is there any truth to this?

Another option would be the same coil unit, a 2" soft talalay layer, plus a 2" Serene Foam topper. I like this idea because we both like the feel of memory foam but it makes me too hot. My understanding is that Serene foam has a similar feel to memory foam but sleeps cooler. This build would (theoretically) have the nice responsiveness of latex mixed with some nice contouring.

I was also considering the Arizona Premium Ultimate Hybrid in plush but my concern is that the Combi-Zone coil unit would be too firm and that the cover wouldn't be stretchy enough to get the true feel of the latex or be good for side sleeping. The advantage of going this route, however, is that it would likely be easier to return if we ultimately (pun intended!) don't like it.

One more question I have is that I'm wondering if there is a need for a bottom layer of foam under the coils? I've seen mixed opinions on this and I'd rather not have one if it's not needed to keep costs down but if it truly does offer benefit I have no problem throwing one in there.

Thank you all for reading and I appreciate any help and feedback you can offer.
11 Nov 2021 17:19
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi learningunderground.

Welcome to our Mattress Forum! :) and thanks for your kind words of appreciation.

I have been diagnosed with stenosis, disc degen & potentially fibromyalgia, however, following a recent week of travel where I suddenly slept peacefully with significant pain reduction, mattress replacement has become an urgent priority. I think that in my current sleep system, the interconnected springs aren't providing sufficient support while the minimal comfort layer is not providing any pressure relief.

I’m sorry to learn of your pre-existing preexisting medical conditions but as you surmised, it isn't quite as cut-and-dry mainly because finding the best configuration for you will be specific not only to your symptoms but also to your particular alignment, comfort, and sensitivity thresholds. You are at a good starting point as typically people with similar conditions find it difficult to pinpoint if the pains that are mattress-related, medical, or both (and the percentage of each). There is some information about the many different symptoms that people may experience on a mattress and some of the most common causes behind them in post #2 here that you may find useful to peruse.

.1) Any thoughts/feedback on the performance of Berkeley Ergonomics' Copenhagen model (2" talalay soft or firm over 6" of 7-zone talalay core in firm: www.berkeleyergo.com/natural-talalay-latex) and the benefit of the euro slats?

Both 8” and 10” Copenhagen are good quality mattresses with no weak links in terms of durability and you can see some basic benefits of euro (arched) slats systems They are typically used under thinner latex mattresses so that the mattress thickness does not negate the effect of the flexible slats. They can be part of the design of a sleeping system or can be used to fine-tune a mattress for better support/comfort match of each individual for reducing pressure points and increasing support in needed areas of the body and can also help with stabilizing the sleep posture if you sleep in one position only. A flexible support system under a mattress can change the feel and response of the mattress compared to a rigid non-flexing support system (which would be a more common choice for a latex mattress) This can be either detrimental or beneficial depending on which combination (your mattress on a flexible slat support system vs a rigid non-flexing support system) is the best match for you in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences). When the euro slats are used they become an "active" part of a sleeping system just like any of the other layers or components in the mattress itself that compresses or flex under bodyweight so it can certainly affect the feel and performance of the mattress for better or for worse and while not impossible it can be problematic for combination sleepers to find the golden mean. As you can see on Berkley’s website, they offer flexible slats, flexible-adjustable slats, or plain solid wood foundations. In some cases, if each side of the support system has flex and there is no flex in the middle center support beam (or if you have two twin XL foundations side to side with the firmer edges in the middle) then you may be able to feel the firmer center support through the mattress. You can see some additional comments about flexible slat systems vs rigid non flexing foundations in post #2 here and post #2 here and post #13 here .

In the same vein...you may be interested to look at the CBH Wood’s “Tri-Slat” slat system consisting of latex on wooden slats in conjunction with the supportive latex strips, is placed on a solid wooden frame. This system allows for dynamic adjustments of the support/comfort functions of the bed due to the body’s weight, shape, and various sleeping positions, thus promoting adequate spinal and joint alignment. The system’s design has the capacity to accommodate a wider range of individual sleeping positions and needs. Here is what one of CBH wood customers with complex medical conditions reports about the Balancer system

Zoned latex cores seem relatively uncommon and I wonder if this would lead to uneven material/support breakdown over time (either felt throughout an individual night or over the years). Are there any additional considerations I should take into account?


As far as zoning goes ... it can certainly be helpful in more unusual circumstances. With latex, zoning may not be as necessary because of the nature of latex itself and its higher compression modulus than other foams (particularly with Dunlop) but even here it can have some benefits and allow for the use of softer foam under wider/lighter shoulders than may otherwise be possible. There's more about zoning and some of my thoughts about it in this article .
Zoning in a latex slab is achieved using different size pins to increase or decrease the amount of material in a section of the rubber which in effect alters the amount of material in that particular section which will change its overall density. Depending of the pin size used in a specific section of the slab results in a softer or firmer feel. Berkley uses “gentle zoning” with small differences in pin size between zoning sections. (e.g. the smallest pin size in their picture is around the edge of the slab which creates firmer perimeter support. The impact on durability is negligible. In addition to this, there is a 2” un-zoned softer comfort layer “buffer” and further away from direct mechanical stress. At your 21.5 BMI, I would not have any durability concerns or this zoned layer. One of the problems with zoning, however, is that people have different body configurations and heights and this zoning might not work for everyone as the zoning does not adjust to the size of the people.

Could you recommend any SleepEZ/SOL/APM/LMF/Flobeds or DIY combinations that I could explore that would feel similar? I'm not sure how the feel of the BE Copenhagen firm 7-zone latex core (I believe 6" of ~36 ILD talalay, with greater pressure relief at shoulders and hips) would be translated into solid latex layers, and the BE Copenhagen comfort layer could use some tweaking for my goldilocks solution:

I would certainly reach out to FloBeds ( our Trusted Members here ) as they offer a very competitive zoned system and I would use their advice picking out layers, as this has a little more science behind it and can get very complicated. You can reach them by phone or through FloBeds dedicated forum with the main area of expertise around latex and zoning and are very familiar with Berkley’s lineups and most likely the best to approximate the feel you like with the BE models.

I hope some of this information helps you out with your eventual decisions

Phoenix
09 Nov 2021 21:34
  • learningunderground
  • learningunderground's Avatar
HI there,

Thanks to Phoenix and all those running/contributing this platform -- it's truly a wealth of information.

I'm a 5'10" 32F ~150lb back & side sleeper (60/40) with disruptive upper back, neck, rib and collar bone pain the last 1.5 years. I have been diagnosed with stenosis, disc degen & potentially fibromyalgia, however following a recent week of travel where I suddenly slept peacefully with significant pain reduction, mattress replacement has become an urgent priority. I think that in my current sleep system, the interconnected springs aren't providing sufficient support while the minimal comfort layer is not providing any pressure relief.

I like the idea of a full latex mattress for: the buoyancy, the high support paired with high pressure relief, and durability. I'm flexible on price and need a solution ASAP. I live in the midwest where I've only had access to try Naturepedic EOS mattresses (fully dunlop & hybrid dunlop) and Berkeley Ergonomics systems (full talalay with a zoned core & hybrid talalay). I preferred the full talalay latex (specifically the Copenhagen model with 2" soft talalay over 6" firm 7-zone talalay core) over the other options. I have not found somewhere within a reasonable drive where I can try mixed talalay/dunlop layers.

Two questions:
1) Any thoughts/feedback on the performance of Berkeley Ergonomics' Copenhagen model (2" talalay soft or firm over 6" of 7-zone talalay core in firm: www.berkeleyergo.com/natural-talalay-latex) and the benefit of the euro slats? Zoned latex cores seem relatively uncommon and I wonder if this would lead to uneven material/support breakdown over time (either felt throughout an individual night or over the years). Are there any additional considerations I should take into account?
2) The BE Copenhagen model may have a 1-2 month wait time so I may need to pursue an intermediate/alternative solution. Could you recommend any SleepEZ/SOL/APM/LMF/Flobeds or DIY combinations that I could explore that would feel similar? I'm not sure how the feel of the BE Copenhagen firm 7-zone latex core (I believe 6" of ~36 ILD talalay, with greater pressure relief at shoulders and hips) would be translated into solid latex layers, and the BE Copenhagen comfort layer could use some tweaking for my goldilocks solution: The firm option (I believe 2" of ~36 ILD talalay ) was comfortable for back-sleeping but potentially not quite plush enough for side sleeping; while the soft option (I believe 2" of ~22 ILD talalay) was comfortable for side sleeping but potentially too plush for back sleeping. Would love recommendations on number of layers, depth per layer, material per layer, and ILD of layers (or S/M/F recommendations per seller since those vary in terms of ILD).

Thank you!
03 Nov 2021 10:12
  • clvnng
  • clvnng's Avatar
Male: 170lbs 5'5" (50/50 side back sleeper) + Female: 115lbs 5'4" (50/50 side back sleeper)

I slept on a bed that I really liked made by Berkeley Ergonomics (Top to Bottom):
2" Super Soft Vita Talalay latex
3" Firm Vita Talalay Latex
Springs are 6 ¼"

I really liked the bed but it was also way out of my budget so I'm thinking of DIY from Arizona Mattress (Top to Bottom):
2" Soft Talalay 19 ILD (I was originally thinking super soft 14 ILD for additional hugging feeling, but the transition from the layer under it might be too harsh?)
3" Talalay 28 ILD ( I was previously thinking 32 ILD, but I think that was too hard)
Quantum Edge Bolsa 8" Springs


I slept on a bed with just the firm (28-32ILD) latex and I really like the support. The additional soft latex (14-19ILD) on top adds a hugging feel that I and my wife really like, that's the only reason for the 2" on top. I also prefer hybrid (over 100% latex) just because it's more breathable. we're both really really hot sleepers.

Thank you and everyone else on this forum for the help. its been so educational! This modular design is def the way to go, for convenience and sustainability reasons. so smart! no more throwing out mattresses when most of it is still good.

The other thing I like to add is I (Male) currently have a Douglas aka novos beds. I HATE IT. the middle sags so much when I sleep on it now after 3 years. I came back from vacation sleeping on random hotel mattresses and bam! 1 night on the Douglas and I have lower back pain. I've been fighting back pain for 3 ish years and I'm really active, yoga, biking, hockey, chiro, physio, basically tried everything. I think my bed is a contributor to the problem. My back pain comes and goes but when it's bad it's really bad.

let me know if I'm on the right track. I'm open to suggestions and maybe adding layers later? Some feedback on 19ILD VS. 14ILD 2" Layer and the 28 vs. 32 ILD 3" layer would be awesome!

thank you so much. I'm super excited about this bed!
03 Nov 2021 06:17
  • deepsleep02
  • deepsleep02's Avatar
Hi Jenninsb, I'm wondering which mattress you ended up purchasing, Berkeley or Whitney Snow, and what the outcome was. We're in the Raleigh area and thinking of one of those mattresses as well. Thanks!
27 Sep 2021 08:40
  • NCSteve07
  • NCSteve07's Avatar
Thank you so much for providing some great resources.

In the end, I decided to go with the Berkeley Ergonomics mattress protector. Seems it will provide the most airflow.
20 Sep 2021 06:48
  • needsleep_
  • needsleep_'s Avatar

how wide are the slats on that frame?


The slats are 3.5" wide and spaced by 1".
20 Sep 2021 06:45
  • needsleep_
  • needsleep_'s Avatar

I'm considering getting the silk and snow organic - why do you think it will fall apart fast? I have heard that the springs may poke through the thin material on the bottom of the mattress i s this the concern?


To be honest, just my past (poor) experience with many different mattress brands. The springs on the bottom half did indeed feel very flimsy and I could see there being issues with them. However I am nowhere near an expert. It just felt cheap when moving it compared to my Berkley mattress.I wouldn't put too much stock into my opinion there. I'm sure all of the bed in a box companies have similar levels of quality.
19 Sep 2021 01:19
  • lantern71
  • lantern71's Avatar
Displaying 1 - 20 out of 679 results.
The Mattress UndergroundCopyright © 2022 The Mattress Underground
TheMattressUndergounf
TMU
TheMattressUndergounf