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Searched for: Astrabeds
26 Sep 2017 10:13
  • phoenix
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Hi scoaste,

Although you’ve already made a purchase, I feel it necessary to point out for anyone else who may visit this thread what I already mentioned in one of my replies to you regarding the folly of using reviews as any sort of reliable indicator of the appropriateness of any product for one’s specific needs. The volume of comments and reviews about a product online have no correlation to the quality of the product or stability of any business, as is evidenced by many start-ups with a huge online presence, as they curry such results through promoted posts and affiliate advertising and discounts. I think highly of the people at Foam Sweet Foam, their products and their knowledge, and regardless of any online claims, they do not ship used layers.

As for Astrabeds, you can perform a forum search on them here (just click on the link) and the marketing group of which they are a part. Unfortunately, there is no mattress guaranteed to relieve back pains, so again I would take such online reviews with a grain of salt. If one product worked well for a certain individual it is no guarantee of applicability, pro or con, toward another person.

Good luck with your new mattress!

Phoenix
25 Sep 2017 14:18
  • scoaste
  • scoaste's Avatar
FSF: Thanks. I read a couple of disgruntled reviews about them (sending used layers, not refunding a difficult to please customer), but they seem to be outliers. That said, I feel I am taking a bit of a chance because the amount of information about them is not as copious as other manufacturers. But the authenticity of reviews of some of the other companies seem suspect as well.

Astrabeds: Yeah maybe it's a low budget spinoff, but I can't wait forever. They seemed to have a lot of positive feedback about relieving back pain though.
25 Sep 2017 14:08
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi scoaste,

Okay I did it FSF:
- Top Layer: Talalay Soft
- 2nd Layer: Talalay Medium
- 3rd Layer: Dunlop Firm
- Bottom Layer: Dunlop XFirm


Congratulations on your new Foam Sweet Foam mattress purchase! :cheer: As you're already aware, you did choose something using high quality materials. I'll be interested in learning about your new mattress once you've had a chance to sleep upon it for a while.

BTW, I wonder if Astrabeds is still in business. No replies from anybody and their website has a certificate error (expired) trying to check out (just wanted to see what ended up in the cart).


I'm not sure about that. Their facebook and twitter accounts haven't posted since the summer of 2016, and their web site is very slow in loading. There have been other complaints online about lack of response as well. But I can't find any information that the brand has gone out of business.

Phoenix
25 Sep 2017 13:05
  • scoaste
  • scoaste's Avatar
Okay I did it FSF:

- Top Layer: Talalay Soft
- 2nd Layer: Talalay Medium
- 3rd Layer: Dunlop Firm
- Bottom Layer: Dunlop XFirm

BTW, I wonder if Astrabeds is still in business. No replies from anybody and their website has a certificate error (expired) trying to check out (just wanted to see what ended up in the cart).
24 Sep 2017 15:31
  • scoaste
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Update: Well, I'm still no closer to making a decision. In fact, after more research now I've added Astrabeds and Zenhaven to the list (sigh). Thought I had it narrowed down to 2, now it's up to 5. Nothing is ever easy...
19 Aug 2017 14:22
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
HI Jamielou,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I am looking at purchasing the AS4 by Amerisleep


From what I've been able to gather, but I’m not 100% certain, the specifications on the AS4 seem to be 4” 4 lb memory foam, 1” 1.65 lb SMT polyfoam, and a 7” 1.8 lb polyfoam support core. These materials, if correct, would generally be considered adequate for someone below a high BMI range, although at a bit of a higher price point than other memory foam mattresses using “similar” constructions. AmeriSleep is a sister company to AstraBeds and SimplyRest. Their memory foam mattresses are made by Anatomic Global which is owned by Foamex/FXI.

After reading different reviews and watching videos I felt pretty good about the company overall. I have searched your mattress forums and didn't get that same vibe about the Amerisleep .


While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful, I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your own Personal preferences) may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ).

I did a bed match at a local mattress store and the Temurpedic Cloud was chosen for me to try. I actually loved it but not the price.


Most of the pressure mapping systems are specific to a certain line of mattress and aren't really relevant to mattresses as a whole which have different constructions. They also only measure surface pressure (which you can often feel in your own personal testing) but don't provide input into alignment or how the pressure is distributed in the deeper body tissues or include the differences in physiology between people (pressure affects different people differently). There are a few more comments in post #2 here and post #4 here about pressure mapping systems.

I have never slept on a MF bed and am having a hard time ordering without seeing it.


When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc.) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs, options, and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else. Also, you’ll want to be sure to become completely familiar with any potential return/exchange policies when ordering online, should your purchase unfortunately turn out not as you had hoped.

While not a complete listing, you may wish to look online and use the experience and expertise of the members listed in post #21 here who are all very experienced and knowledgeable and specialize in providing the type of help and guidance on the phone that can help you make good choices. There are a wide range of memory foam and other options included in the choices there and I believe that all of them compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, and transparency. In addition to the online members of the site listed in the previous membership link, post #12 here has some other online memory foam options for those who are looking for a memory foam mattress.

You may also wish to take a look at the mattress shopping tutorial here and follow the steps outlines there which will assist you in comparing/analyzing mattresses.

Hopefully that gives you a bit more information, but I’ll be happy to answer more specific questions that you may have.

Phoenix

BTW, I deleted your other post, as it was almost a duplicate of your first one.
31 May 2017 11:24
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi zab,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

I’m happy to assist you and provide some advice. While I can’t help with “what” to choose, I certainly can assist with the “how” part of things.

The first thing I would recommend is to "reset" how you are looking at mattresses and immediately stop relying upon reviews. While other people's comments about the knowledge and service of a particular business can certainly be very helpful ... I would always keep in mind that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and I would be cautious about using anyone else's suggestions, experiences or reviews on a specific mattress (either positive or negative) or review sites in general as a reliable source of information or guidance about how you will feel on the same mattress or how suitable or how durable a mattress may be for you. In many if not most cases they can be more misleading than helpful because a mattress that would be a perfect choice for one person or even a larger group of people in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on (even if they are in a similar weight range). In other words ... reviews or other people's experiences in general won't tell you much if anything about the suitability, quality, durability, or "value" of a mattress for any particular person (see post #13 here ), and should not be used as any sort of a reliable indicator about the quality or appropriateness of a mattress for your specific needs.

The first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, durability and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

As part of your mattress research, I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase. If you can't find out this information, I would consider that a risky purchase and would recommend looking elsewhere.

as a graduate student, my budget is extremely limited: $900 tops, ~$600 preferable.


For those that have a more restricted budget then post #4 here and the posts it links to also include many of the better lower budget online options I'm aware of as well. Some of these companies are members here of the site (listed in post #21 here ) who are all very experienced and knowledgeable and specialize in providing the type of help and guidance on the phone that can help you make good choices. There are a wide range of options included in the choices there (some quite affordable) and I believe that all of them compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, and transparency.

Posts #1 and #2 in this topic also includes more information about the new "breed' of "simplified choice" mattresses (aka "one choice fits all" or "universal comfort" or "bed in a box" or "disruptor" or "millennial" mattresses) that are available online as well that are typically in a budget range of between $600 and $1000 (queen size).

I'm overweight (about 250 pounds), though I plan on losing weight in the next year.


Heavier people in general will need firmer and thicker comfort layers and firmer support layers than those who are lighter and because no materials will last as long with much higher weights the quality and durability of the materials and components is even more important than normal. I wouldn't "rule out" any types of mattress and base your choices on your own personal testing. Post #3 here has more information and suggestions about heavier weights that is worth reading.

I live in Austin, TX


Subject to first confirming that any retailer or manufacturer on the list that you wish to visit is completely transparent ( see this article ) and to making sure that any mattress you are considering meets the quality/value guidelines here ... some of the better options or possibilities I’m aware of in and around San Antonio and Austin is in post #2 here .

In my limited experience, I don't get good sleep on spring mattresses, because I can feel pressure points from the springs.


I don’t doubt that this is the case if your limited experience has been with less expensive innerspring mattresses using little and lower quality foams.

But I also don't really like that memory foam "feel" - very firm, locks you in place, not easy to roll around, etc. I think this is why I tend to prefer medium-firm memory foam mattresses. I usually sleep on my side.


All memory foam will tend to be more difficult to reposition when sleeping, and one that is more “medium-firm” would be a memory foam mattress with less overall memory foam in the comfort layers, as all memory foam is quite plush and not very resilient.

So, then I started looking at online distributors (Amerisleep, Leesa, Nectar, Tuft & Needle, etc.).


The Nectar uses a 1” of 4 lb gel memory foam, a 3-inch 3.5 lb memory foam with a medical grade cooling and finally a 2.2 lb polyfoam core. They don’t list the thickness of the polyfoam core, or the thickness of the quilted gel memory foam panel or the density of that material. The polyfoam core uses a good density foam, but I would use some caution with the 3” of 3.5 lb. memory foam on top of the core, as that is a bit lower than I would normally recommend. They are a product assembled in the USA of components sourced from China and the US. They do not specific what is from where. I would caution against purchasing this item before knowing the complete specifications and component origins. I can't speak to what you're referencing with the "false marketing" comment.

I would be more cautious with Amerisleep , as they tend to use some lower quality materials than what I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines. Amerisleep, along with Astrabeds and Simplyrest , is part of onemallgroup , which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito .

You can use the search feature of the forum to pull up more information about the brands you listed, or you can read through the simplified choice thread here for a consolidated place of information about many of the one-size-fits-all mattresses, including the Leesa and Tuft and Needle.

As a result, I'm left with the feeling that I'm pretty much screwed no matter what I do.


Not at all, unless you give up researching and use reviews as your guidance. And as you are PhD candidate, I’m guessing doing a bit of reading and learning is right up your alley. ;) You shouldn’t have a problem finding something using better density foams that will last you the shorter time frame you need.

Phoenix
20 Feb 2017 14:50
  • phoenix
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Hi GiantsFan2029,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! :)

Seems like there are a ton of options out there, but not a lot of reviews on bases. Amerisleep seemed confident that their bed could go on any adjustable base. That being said, does anyone have any input on this topic.

There is more information about choosing an adjustable bed in post #3 here and the main adjustable bed topic that it links to that can help you choose an adjustable bed based on price vs features comparisons and also includes some retailers that you can use as good sources of information about the features of the adjustable beds they carry and as pricing references as well (in post #6 in the main adjustable bed topic). Of course there are many other sources as well and prices can change on a regular basis so I would also include some internet searching in your research. I would also keep in mind that online advertised prices are often price controlled so make sure you call the stores you are considering to find out their best prices rather than just looking at websites. Here is another adjustable bed base thread with some manufacturers listed.

I would consider all the major adjustable bed manufacturers to be closely comparable in terms of reliability, so I would use price and feature comparisons to choose between them. I would also give some careful consideration to the type of features that you may find useful over a longer period of time because some of the features they offer may seem very "enticing" when you are shopping but some people may find that they don't use them as much as they thought they would once the novelty has worn off.

We ended up going with Amirsleep Revere.

While I’m happy you found a new mattress :cheer: , I would be more cautious with Amerisleep , as they tend to use some lower quality materials than what I would normally suggest in the durability guidelines . Hopefully you were able to learn the density of all of the foam layers within your mattress before making your purchase. Amerisleep, along with Astrabeds and Simplyrest , is part of onemallgroup , which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito . The good news is that you did make a smart decision to purchase a mattress that does allow for a return should it not turn out as well as you had hoped for.

I hope the adjustable bed base information helps you on your search, and you should have no issues with your new mattress bending with any power foundation.

Phoenix
30 Oct 2016 20:04
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi sleepymike,

Welcome to the Mattress Forum! .

i just want someone to tell me what to buy given the following parameters:


The one thing that doesn’t occur here is choosing a product for someone else. We provide the tools that you can use to make your own decision.

To questions like yours, I have a bit of a standard reply, with some excellent resources should you want to “help yourself” in making an educated decision:

While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience ( see post #2 here ).

I'm not sure what you've read since you found the site but just in case you haven't read it yet ... the first place to start your research is the mattress shopping tutorial here which includes all the basic information, steps, and guidelines that can help you make the best possible choice ... and perhaps more importantly know how and why to avoid the worst ones.

Two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

i just want something good. frontrunners include the zenhaven, astrabed, plushbed botanical bliss, or the ultimate dreams total latex.


You can do a search on the forum regarding these brands and others you might be considering.

There are also some comments about the Zenhaven mattress in post #2 here . This is an all latex mattress that also uses high quality and durable materials but it's also a "finished" mattress that only allows you to choose between different firmness levels on each side of the mattress and doesn't have options to customize the support or pressure relief of the mattress either before or after a purchase by rearranging layers or exchanging a layer that are available with component latex mattresses that use the same materials and are in a similar or even lower budget range.

Astrabeds is just part of a larger marketing company (and somewhat high pressure at that) that sells latex mattresses ... they are certainly not manufacturers or even "mattress people" and I would take much of what they say with a grain of salt because much of it is certainly not factual and they don't provide what I would consider to be accurate information. While latex is certainly a great material ... these are also not the best value available to you. You can read a conversation I had with them here and you can read more about this group of companies in post #4 here and post #4 here . A forum search on Astrabeds or Simplyrest or Amerisleep (which along with others are owned by onemallgroup which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito ) will bring up more information about them.

You can see some comments about Plushbeds in post #2 here and a forum search on Plushbeds (you can just click the link) will bring up much more information and comments/feedback about them as well. They also use good quality and durable materials in their mattresses (natural or organic Dunlop and Talalay latex) and there are no lower quality materials or weak links in their latex mattresses that would be a cause for concern either and they would certainly be a much "better than average" choice compared to most of the mainstream mattresses that most people end up buying. They do a lot of internet advertising so they do attract a lot of online attention for those that are looking for a latex mattress but I would make some careful "value comparisons" with some of the other component latex options that are available to you because they may not be in the "best value" range for many of the members here that are aware of the many other similar options that are available to them.

Dreamfoam (Ultimate Dreams Total Latex) is a member of this site which means that I think very highly of both of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency. I certainly wouldn't hesitate to purchase a mattress from either of them.

Post #3 here also includes a list of many of the online manufacturers that sell component latex mattresses with loose layers and zip covers as well, in case you are looking at other options.

Phoenix
12 Jun 2016 18:11
  • Dave_C
  • Dave_C's Avatar
ADMIN: *** New topic split from this topic ***

Hi LYunsaker,

In doing my research, below are the sites I found that all concur with Astrabeds being the most-highly rated, any advice would be appreciated.

bestmattress-brand(org), whatsthebestbed(org), bestmattress-reviews(org), mattress-inquirer(com), mattressjournal(com).


I would hope that you have seen through these sites and recognized that they are only advertising sites for Astrabeds. :blink: .

All of these sites are a few of many owned and run by Astrabeds (or their sister companies Amerisleep or Simply Rest) and part of their massive marketing campaign to create an internet presence. It's pretty clear that they are just "masquerading" as being "independent".

Astrabeds is just part of a larger marketing company (and somewhat high pressure at that) that sells latex mattresses ... they are certainly not manufacturers or even "mattress people" and I would take much of what they say with a grain of salt because much of it is certainly not factual and they don't provide what I would consider to be accurate information. While latex is certainly a great material ... these are also not the best value available to you. You can read a conversation I had with them here and you can read more about this group of companies in post #4 here and post #4 here . A forum search on Astrabeds or Simplyrest or Amerisleep (which along with others are owned by onemallgroup which specializes in viral marketing in partnership with Kim Tyrone Agapito ) will bring up more information about them.

Botanical and natural are just two words for the same thing meaning natural rubber that comes from a tree. You can read more about the different types of latex in this article and in post #6 here .

If you are looking for online latex mattress sources that provide better quality, value, knowledge, experience, and customer service ... and are truly mattress people ... then the list in post #21 here should be helpful.

Before proceeding further with Astrabeds (or any of their sister companies) I would be very cautious and do some "real" research on more reputable sites with more accurate and less biased information and talk with more knowledgeable manufacturers and retailers.

Phoenix


FANTASTIC INFORMATION, Phoenix! Thank you. I am back in the market and probably going latex and ran into Astrabeds in one of their marketing sites listed in the OP. They certainly know how to mix fact with fiction in a convincing manner. After a lot of my own research, as well as the great info you provide here, I am leaning heavily towards Urban Green (FSF) at this point.
02 Feb 2016 13:52
  • phoenix
  • phoenix's Avatar
Hi GoDucks08,

'I can't tell you how much bad information exists in this area with such a lack of science and unbiased education. My wife and I have had a tempurpedic for 4 years and I have connected chronic hamstring problems to a lack of support. so we started searching for a bed with more support since running and ultra runs are core to our life.


I certainly agree with you that there is a lot of misinformation or very misleading information in the industry!

I just ordered from FloBeds and not astrabeds. I can thank you for that choice as Astrabeds has a pretty savvy marketing arm putting lots of lipstick on the pig(in terms of what they promise vs what they deliver). I should get my Flobed next week, I will update with my experience.


As you know I think you made a great quality choice ... and congratulations on your new mattress :)

I'm looking forward to your comments and feedback once you've received it and have had the chance to sleep on it for a bit.

Phoenix
02 Feb 2016 11:22
  • GoDucks08
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Hi all,

I just wanted to chime in and say thank you, I have been researching to no end mattress's, suppliers, materials and this has been a great resource.

'I can't tell you how much bad information exists in this area with such a lack of science and unbiased education. My wife and I have had a tempurpedic for 4 years and I have connected chronic hamstring problems to a lack of support. so we started searching for a bed with more support since running and ultra runs are core to our life.

after looking at different types, we tried a casper and many others, finally we settled on what I hope is our last choice. I just ordered from FloBeds and not astrabeds. I can thank you for that choice as Astrabeds has a pretty savvy marketing arm putting lots of lipstick on the pig(in terms of what they promise vs what they deliver). I should get my Flobed next week, I will update with my experience. I have returned my casper and others as it was frankly pretty bad in terms of comfort. Casper was awesome with service though, I will give them that..

Thanks again for all your Work Phoenix.
07 Jan 2016 10:05
  • phoenix
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Hi HoustonPerson,

First some of the basics that I link for anyone that is experiencing "symptoms" on their mattress so we are on the same page ...

Unfortunately it's not possible to "diagnose" mattress comfort issues on a forum with any certainty because you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unique unknowns, variables, and complexities involved that can affect how each person sleeps on a mattress in terms of "comfort" and PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) or any "symptoms" they experience so a mattress that would be "perfect" for one person may be completely unsuitable for someone else to sleep on.

Having said that ... there is more about the most common symptoms that people may experience when they sleep on a mattress and the most likely (although not the only) reasons for them in post #2 here .

There is also more about primary or "deep" support and secondary or "surface" support and their relationship to firmness and pressure relief and the "roles" of different layers in a mattress in post #2 here and in post #4 here that may also be helpful in clarifying the difference between "support" and "pressure relief" and "feel".

These posts are the "tools" that can help with the analysis, detective work, or trial and error that may be necessary to help you learn your body's language and "translate" what your body is trying to tell you so you can identify the types of changes that have the best chance of reducing or eliminating any "symptoms" you are experiencing (at least to the degree that any symptoms are from your mattress rather than the result of any other circumstances or pre-existing issues you may have that aren't connected to a mattress).


The mattress is way less supportive than "Medium-Firm" - and does not provide enough support to my lower back and hips. I weigh 107 and have not had trouble with any other mattress hurting my lower back. I can sleep on hotel mattresses and an air mattress without pain.


There are no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

"Support" is often misunderstood because the goal of a "supportive" mattress is to keep the spine and joints in good alignment and this requires the type of contouring support that allows some parts of the body to sink in more (softer) and some parts of the body to sink in less (firmer) and this will vary on an individual basis and the overall firmness of a mattress isn't necessarily an indication of how well it will keep your spine and joints in good alignment because it depends on which layers are softer and which layers are firmer. A mattress that is too firm won't support the more recessed parts of your body (such as the waist or small of the back/lumbar) and a mattress that is too soft won't support the heavier parts of your body (such as the hips/pelvis).

The Astrabed is noticeably firmer if I move over to the very far edge, with part of my buttock and hip just over the side of the bed, but not enough to throw me off balance. I would describe the center of the mattress (on my side and on his) as "sagging." I actually checked the tag Astrabeds puts at the foot of the bed to see whether it was marked as used - since they take back the mattresses, I don't know if they re-issue them or at least the latex guts of the mattress to new purchasers, but the tag did not indicate that anything was re-used or re-purposed.


There are some suggestions in post #4 here that may be helpful for a mattress that is too soft or is sagging but it's very possible that this could be related to the support system under the mattress (your bedframe and foundation). An all latex mattress will generally do best with a firm, flat, and evenly supportive support surface underneath it that has minimal to no flex under the mattress and for larger sizes with at least one center support beam that has good support to the floor to prevent any sagging in the middle of the mattress. The components need to be strong and durable enough to support the weight of the mattress and the people sleeping on it without some of the parts bending, sagging, or breaking over time. The support surface under the mattress should have enough surface area to prevent the mattress from sagging through any gaps or spaces in the support surface over time but still allow some airflow under the mattress. I would suggest that in a slatted support system that any gaps between the slats are no more than 3" (with 1 x 3 slats) although less than that would be better yet.

You could confirm whether this is an issue by putting your mattress on the floor for a few nights to see if it makes any difference.

Just for reference ... returned or exchanged layers or mattresses aren't resold or reused as new (at least it would be against the law to do so and a reputable manufacturer wouldn't take the risk of doing so).

My physical "symptoms" are: pain in my lower back when laying on the mattress which is particularly sharp in the early morning when I've been on the mattress a long time and especially upon rising; pain in the hips as I try to roll over, such that I use my arms and hands to roll myself by grabbing the side of the mattress or the arm of my husb. When I wake up, I have to first try to stretch out some of the pain. Sleeping on my side is better than my back, but I have to continually during the night move from one side to the other to reduce the pain of the sag on that side. I am naturally a flat on my back sleeper, so not being able to sleep on my back for 6 months has caused me sleep deprivation, which makes me want to sleep longer, which would result in increased pain in the back/hips if I gave into it. (I've started falling asleep on my sofa after dinner and catching a couple of solid, comfortable hours there, before moving to the bedroom.) In my natural state, I prefer sleeping most of the night on my back, with some portion of the night on my stomach. On the Astrabed, I cannot sleep or lie on my stomach at all, because the mattress lacks so much support.

In order to put into perspective why I had trouble identifying the cause of the pain, and that the mattress certainly is the cause, I am a person of appropriate weight and substantial physical conditioning. I weigh 107 and have never been overweight. I have never had a back injury or hip injury. I feel better as the day goes onward, because I'm not laying in the bed. I am a cyclist, runner, and active in other outdoor activities. I don't experience pain during activities, just when I am trying to sleep on the bed.


While I can't know for certain ... based on your description (and assuming that your support system is suitable for you and the mattress and isn't the cause of the problem) ... the most common cause for lower back pain is a mattress that is too soft and either has comfort layers that are too thick/soft or a support core that is too soft and I would guess that this is what may be happening.

Your mattress is a component mattress which has the advantage of having layers inside it that can be rearranged (or exchanged) to change the level of support or the level of "comfort" and pressure relief.

It would be helpful (if you know) if you could let me know the firmness of each of the three layers in your mattress and the current order of the layers that you are using (I believe the "default" is a softer 2" layer on the bottom, a firmer 3" layer in the middle, and a softer 2" layer on top). If you aren't sure you can call Astrabeds and ask them about the firmness of the layers in your order. You may also be able to check the relative firmness of each of the layers yourself based on "feel".

Assuming that both of the 2" layers are the same and are softer (which may or may not be the case) ... the first thing I would try is to remove the bottom 2" layer and sleep on the remaining two layers for a few days (the 3" firmer layer on the bottom and the 2" softer layer on the top) and see how it affects your sleeping experience. The two layers will be loose inside the cover but for now the goal is to see how the firmer configuration changes your experience and your back pain when you sleep on your back.

Phoenix
07 Jan 2016 09:15
  • HoustonPerson
  • HoustonPerson's Avatar
I purchased the Astrabed style called SerenityBed in a Queen size, with both sides being Medium-Firm and the purchase was made online in early May 2015.

The mattress is way less supportive than "Medium-Firm" - and does not provide enough support to my lower back and hips. I weigh 107 and have not had trouble with any other mattress hurting my lower back. I can sleep on hotel mattresses and an air mattress without pain.

The Astrabed is noticeably firmer if I move over to the very far edge, with part of my buttock and hip just over the side of the bed, but not enough to throw me off balance. I would describe the center of the mattress (on my side and on his) as "sagging." I actually checked the tag Astrabeds puts at the foot of the bed to see whether it was marked as used - since they take back the mattresses, I don't know if they re-issue them or at least the latex guts of the mattress to new purchasers, but the tag did not indicate that anything was re-used or re-purposed.

My physical "symptoms" are: pain in my lower back when laying on the mattress which is particularly sharp in the early morning when I've been on the mattress a long time and especially upon rising; pain in the hips as I try to roll over, such that I use my arms and hands to roll myself by grabbing the side of the mattress or the arm of my husb. When I wake up, I have to first try to stretch out some of the pain. Sleeping on my side is better than my back, but I have to continually during the night move from one side to the other to reduce the pain of the sag on that side. I am naturally a flat on my back sleeper, so not being able to sleep on my back for 6 months has caused me sleep deprivation, which makes me want to sleep longer, which would result in increased pain in the back/hips if I gave into it. (I've started falling asleep on my sofa after dinner and catching a couple of solid, comfortable hours there, before moving to the bedroom.) In my natural state, I prefer sleeping most of the night on my back, with some portion of the night on my stomach. On the Astrabed, I cannot sleep or lie on my stomach at all, because the mattress lacks so much support.

In order to put into perspective why I had trouble identifying the cause of the pain, and that the mattress certainly is the cause, I am a person of appropriate weight and substantial physical conditioning. I weigh 107 and have never been overweight. I have never had a back injury or hip injury. I feel better as the day goes onward, because I'm not laying in the bed. I am a cyclist, runner, and active in other outdoor activities. I don't experience pain during activities, just when I am trying to sleep on the bed.

I will worship the ground you walk on and this website completely if you can provide me with any guidance that will help me eliminate or even reduce the pain I have on this bed. I know I should have gotten rid of it, but that is so hard to do you've paid that much, and you think about trying to haul it back down the hallway, and out the door. I would love an opportunity to fix it, although I realize that will cost money too!
30 Dec 2015 08:28
  • shaxpere
  • shaxpere's Avatar
Hi, I'm very much a newbie at mattress buying, and now am in a predicament of my own making. I'm hoping that I can get some sage advice from this forum. Please excuse my blatant ignorance and obvious mistakes.

This fall my wife and I decided to finally replace our 10 year old Restonic innerspring mattress that was sagging in the middle. After almost no research, other than to determine that organic latex seemed like a good idea, we ordered a medium-firm Harmony from Astrabeds. Construction is three 3" layers of Dunlop latex, with densities of (bottom to top) 90, 80, 70, topped with a wool comfort layer.

Mattress delivered and installed, we started using it and I started getting lower back pain that I could not relieve by changing position. Not every night, but more often than not. I'm mostly a side sleeper, and on the old mattress if I would ever start to feel pain, I would just rollover, which would realign things. Thinking I needed the new mattress to be firmer, I reversed the order of the layers. Not only did this not help me, but my wife hated the change. We finally gave up and returned the mattress.

Thinking that I still needed firm, but with better conformity/comfort, I discovered Essentia, which makes a slow-release latex akin to memory foam. This time I visited their store in New York City while on a work trip. After talking with the rep and trying the different mattresses, I got a queen Classic 8, which has 6" of Dunlop latex (no idea of density) topped with 2" of 5.25 lb latex "memory foam".

Mattress delivered and installed, first night was awful. Neither of us could get comfortable. Second night (last night) we added an old 2" foam egg crate layer we had on the guest bed. It was marginally more comfortable, but I still had back pain.

To add to my confusion, during the interim between the Astrabed and the Essentia, we used our guest bed, which is a 25 year old (at least) double innerspring with the 2" egg crate. We both slept really well!

So here we are. I've read a bunch of posts here this morning, and I apparently had my head on backwards. My wife (5'3" and 120lbs) and I (5'9" and 145 lbs) are fairly light and are both back and side sleepers. So I guess we should have been looking at softer mattresses. So what do we do? Exchange this mattress for another Essentia? Add additional comfort layers? Return it and go with yet another brand?

Please help!
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