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Understanding the Mattress durability guidelines 03 Feb 2022 18:34 #1

  • Seat15c
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I am a bit confused. Phoenix outlines NEST Specs:
Nest Natural Hybrid Latex in Firm - A good combination of firm support and contouring around my lower lumbar region. … I suspect it's not an entirely latex mattress and that some of the foam is poly.
.1" Organic Stretch Knit Cotton and Joma Wool
1.5" 1.5lb Eco Flex Quilting Foam
3" Oeko-tex Cert. Dunlop Latex 34ILD
1" 1.5LB Eco-Friendly Comfort Foam
6" Caliber Edge Coil Support Pocketed Coils 16 gauge steel
1" 1.5lb Support Foam

And then goes on to say:
Nest Bedding is one of our Trusted Members of this site and like all the members here I think very highly of and consider them to be among the "best of the best" in the industry. The Nest Hybrid Latex is a mattress that uses good quality and durable materials that would be suitable for your weight/BMI range and there are no lower quality materials or weak links in any of them that would be a cause for concern in terms of the durability and useful life of their mattresses.

But the Mattress durability guidelines Says if you have a BMI between
20 and 30 "Polyurethane foam (often called polyfoam): If your mattress is one-sided then I would make sure that the density of any polyfoam is at least 1.8 lb per cubic foot or higher."

I'm not trying to call anyone out; I just want to make sure I understand what is being said. Are you saying the NEST mattress is not good for a person with a BMI over 20?

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Understanding the Mattress durability guidelines 04 Feb 2022 00:53 #2

  • phoenix
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Hi Seat15c.

I’ve noticed you duplicated yesterday’s post so I deleted it to keep the conversation focused in one place and ease of reference.

But the Mattress durability guidelines Says if you have a BMI between
20 and 30 "Polyurethane foam (often called polyfoam): If your mattress is one-sided then I would make sure that the density of any polyfoam is at least 1.8 lb per cubic foot or higher."

. I'm not trying to call anyone out; I just want to make sure I understand what is being said. Are you saying the NEST mattress is not good for a person with a BMI over 20?

I am glad you are asking. Good questions Seat15c! If more people would be as inquisitive as you are, the mattress industry overall would be in a better industry. Great job of identifying any potential weak links and running them by the durability guidelines. Let’s take look and discuss why this mattress, for normal BMI ranges, would not raise any red flags in terms of durability. Here are some more pieces of this puzzle. (Pun intended)

Comfort layers also include any quilting used in the very top part of a mattress since they act together to give a mattress its pressure-relieving qualities. This means that the comfort layer(s) thickness for this mattress is around 4.6” (within the 3” - 6” height range for comfort layers that typically are softer with ower ILD/IFDs).

The general rule is that there should be no more than "about an inch or so" of lower quality/density materials in the comfort and quilting layers combined (around an inch or so would not have a significant effect on the durability or longevity of the mattress). Once you are at about 2" or more of lower quality materials, they are likely to be the weak link of the mattress. You can see this in mentioned in the Mattress comfort layer overview article ,

Going back to Nests mattress, it is acceptable to have about “an inch or so” of lower density soft polyfoam in the quilting (in this case 1.5 lbs) without compromising the integrity of the mattress. This uppermost “skin” layer is not under the same laws as the rest of the mattress. The polyfoam in this layer will be gradually breaking in and/or breaking down but it will not affect the spinal alignment. (Spinal alignment can be compromised either by a sagging mattress and/or a mattress being too soft and lacking primary support for a certain sleeper) Additionally, this “skin” atop of a mattress can be quilted tighter or looser (depending on the design) but 1” or 1.5” would not create significant “sag” and any foam breakdown that may occur overtime will mostly contribute to the contouring cradle around the sleeper’s profile.

The next layer of 3” NR Dunlop meets the durability guidelines in all its comfort options.
To quote directly from the Mattress durability guidelines

Most materials and components will become softer as they break down over time (especially under the heavier parts of the body such as the hips/pelvis) while fiber materials will compress and pack down and become firmer and less "fluffy" over time. This is why the durability of the upper comfort and transition layers (the top 3" to 6" of the mattress) are especially important when you are assessing the durability and useful life of the mattress as a whole because they will usually be the weakest link in the mattress in terms of durability and the materials and components that are closer to the bottom of a mattress (the support core of the mattress) won't normally be the weakest link in the mattress.

The next 1” layer of 1.5lb/ft3 transitional polyfoam layer is deeper into the mattress and under a firm latex layer. This layer of 34 ILD would “protect” the transition layer from the mechanical stress the upper layers are under. This transitional layer acts as a buffer between the coils and the latex, preventing possible bottoming on the coils below, especially for higher BMIs. The transition layer may be placed in this particular location within the construction to absorb and dissipate some of the force that is being created by the possible uplift in pressure from the firm coils. This said I would still offer a slight caution in a soft latex layer is used instead of Firm or Medium in the same configuration which may cause the 1” poly transitional layer some wear and tear over time.

I see that you got the spec listing from one of our subscribers, pucknyc, in Post #35 . He posted these specs mid-2020 and I’d keep in mind that companies sometimes rework certain lines which seems to be the case with this mattress (unless pucknyc specs are not accurate). This mattress is now called Owl and the specs appear to be changed. You can find the layering and construction of the Owl | Natural Latex Hybrid and the Owl’s updated specs here on our site. One of the members of our Team corresponded with Nest to update these specs sometime last month.

I hope the info provided above brings some more clarity and helps with understanding the many interconnected variables that are involved in assessing mattress durability.
Phoenix
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Understanding the Mattress durability guidelines 04 Feb 2022 19:38 #3

  • Seat15c
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Phoenix thank you for the reply. I think I understand what you explained. I hope you don't mind if I ask you a few follow on questions: I understand

There should be no more than "about an inch or so" of lower quality/density materials in the comfort and quilting layers combined. Once you are at about 2" or more of lower quality materials, they are likely to be the weak link of the mattress.

And

Nests mattress, it is acceptable to have about “an inch or so” of lower density soft polyfoam in the quilting (in this case 1.5 lbs) without compromising the integrity of the mattress. The polyfoam in this layer will be gradually breaking in and/or breaking down but it will not affect the spinal alignment.

I got that, but the Nest has 2.5 inches between the top of the mattress and the comfort layer
1" Organic Stretch Knit Cotton and Joma Wool
You mentioned: fiber materials will compress and pack down and become firmer and less "fluffy" over time. This is why the durability of the upper comfort and transition layers (the top 3" to 6" of the mattress) are especially important when you are assessing the durability and useful life of the mattress as a whole

You spoke to the 1.5 inches of foam, but how does the above mention 1-inch which totals 2.5 inches of cover comfort layering top layering, more than 2 inches impact this mattress? "There should be no more than "about an inch or so" of lower quality/density materials in the comfort and quilting layers combined. Once you are at about 2" or more of lower quality materials, they are likely to be the weak link of the mattress."
1.5" 1.5lb Eco Flex Quilting Foam

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Understanding the Mattress durability guidelines 05 Feb 2022 21:22 #4

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Hi Seat15c.

You spoke to the 1.5 inches of foam, but how does the above mention 1-inch which totals 2.5 inches of cover comfort layering top layering, more than 2 inches impact this mattress? "There should be no more than "about an inch or so" of lower quality/density materials in the comfort and quilting layers combined. Once you are at about 2" or more of lower quality materials, they are likely to be the weak link of the mattress."

Nest’s Owl has only 1.5 inches above the 3" firm latex. The Polyfoam and Jooma wool quilting are all one layer.
This is the layering screenshot taken today from their website:
• I am not sure which set of specs you looked at, but if you looked on Nest’s TMU profile page I understand why the confusion. Our team listed the first layer as having .1" Organic Stretch Knit Cotton and Jooma Wool and the second layer as 1.5" 1.5lb Eco-Flex Quilting Foam for a total of 1.6”. I’ll make sure the layering will be showing exactly as per Nest’s site.

(12.5") Owl Natural Latex Hybrid Mattres is in within the “one inch or so” and “no more than “about 2" or more” range for of lower density foams that can be used in the quilting without affecting the mattress integrity and durability.

Phoenix
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Understanding the Mattress durability guidelines 08 Feb 2022 20:33 #5

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Gotcha Thanks so much!! It makes total sense now!

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