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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 16:06 #1

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Greetings all. New here, though I've done my best to read up. I need a new mattress, I have chronic pain, at least in part due to a herniated thoracic hernation. My old bed had a 25+ year old mattress on a frame and foundation that was ~100 years old. Money is tight, my injury put me out of work and only my husband is working. So we have to keep it cheap by necessity.

I've been having a bit of a princess and a pea thing happening, where nothing seems right. BUT! I just stayed at a friends for about two weeks, and he had an older ikea mattress that was dreamy. He didn't remember what it was, but we figured out that he got it in 2013, so were able to backtrack it to the Sultan Finnvik , thanks to archive.org.

Ikea doesn't make that model anymore. But I was able to find out it's specs: Comfort material: 100 % lamb's wool, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding. I am not sure if it means which layer was the top or bottom, but I'm guessing the 3.1lbs memory foam was on top? Because it's memory foam?

Aside from not knowing what the modern equivalent, there is another possible problem - my friend said that it had softened up significantly since he got it, and he said it was much firmer when he first got it. If he weren't halfway across the country, I would just buy him a new mattress and take his. That worries me - specifically that I won't be able to find something that is soft enough now, or that something that is will be too soft down the road.

I've tried my best to follow along with the guides here. I've got a very tight budget, which of course does not make bed buying easy at all. I found a few more expensive beds that I like, I seem to be leaning towards plush/soft beds. $500 is the most I could scrape together, though I'd prefer to spend less. I just spent a couple weeks on a great ikea mattress, and need help finding something similar.

I haven't been able to do much in-store mattress testing because the twisting motion of getting out of bed is really painful. I haven't really been able to do PPP because of that. When I did try a few, my husband wasn't with me to see my spine alignment. The two beds I found when I did try shopping around were Beauty Rest Okauchee Lake Plush, followed by the Fox Point Luxury Firm (it didn't feel firm to me, just different), then the Lac La Belle Pillow Top, although I was not overly excited by this one. I know the score about there being issues with poor materials and cost due to the brand not quality, but I thought I'd throw that out there to give some idea of what direction my body is going.

I purchased a costco Sealy mattress "Chantelle" that seemed fine in the store but is JUST TOO HARD. It was labeled as a "cushion firm", but I had high hopes because it felt find in the store and the cushion part seemed okay.Even a mattress topper only makes it slightly bearable. Prior to that, I tried a very cheap mattress from amazon, the 8" Contour Signature Sleep - it was far too soft. I knew it was a long shot that it would help, but I had hopes that anything was better than my old mattress. I was wrong.

The closest I could find to the Sultan Finnvik was the Myrbacka Firm . It isn't identical, though, it lists the make up as: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft., 100 % lamb's wool
There is an additional layer there that the Sultan Finnvik doesn't have. I'm not sure what to make of that. Also concerned because it's listed as "firm". The medium firm is actually a latex model , containing: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Synthetic latex, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., 100 % lamb's wool

The closest in price point and build is the Ikea Matrand, which seems to do the same thing, breaking out latex as medium firm and firm is all foam.
Matrand Medium Firm : Comfort material: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Synthetic latex, Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft.
Matrand Firm : Comfort material: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft:

I'm not beholden to Ikea either, other than I know my friends mattress was a dream. Can I look for mattresses with similar specs from, say, amazon? What about other places? Any other recommendations? I would ideally like to keep the price around $300, but know that may not be possible.

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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 16:30 #2

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Oh! For what it's worth, I'm looking for a full mattress. I know it's an odd size these days, but it's the biggest size I have room for.

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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 17:31 #3

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Hi twice,

I've been having a bit of a princess and a pea thing happening, where nothing seems right. BUT! I just stayed at a friends for about two weeks, and he had an older ikea mattress that was dreamy. He didn't remember what it was, but we figured out that he got it in 2013, so were able to backtrack it to the Sultan Finnvik, thanks to archive.org.

Ikea doesn't make that model anymore. But I was able to find out it's specs: Comfort material: 100 % lamb's wool, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding. I am not sure if it means which layer was the top or bottom, but I'm guessing the 3.1lbs memory foam was on top? Because it's memory foam?


The wayback machine is certainly a useful tool that I often use myself.

Like all the Ikea memory foam mattresses ... the Finnvik used 3.1 lb memory foam in the comfort layer which is a lower quality/density and less durable material than I would suggest considering (see the quality/durability guidelines here ) and it would be normal that lower quality/density memory foam will soften much more and more rapidly than higher quality/density versions of memory foam so even a new mattress that had a very similar design would feel significantly different than the same mattress that someone has slept on for years.

I haven't been able to do much in-store mattress testing because the twisting motion of getting out of bed is really painful. I haven't really been able to do PPP because of that. When I did try a few, my husband wasn't with me to see my spine alignment. The two beds I found when I did try shopping around were Beauty Rest Okauchee Lake Plush, followed by the Fox Point Luxury Firm (it didn't feel firm to me, just different), then the Lac La Belle Pillow Top, although I was not overly excited by this one. I know the score about there being issues with poor materials and cost due to the brand not quality, but I thought I'd throw that out there to give some idea of what direction my body is going.

I've tried my best to follow along with the guides here. I've got a very tight budget, which of course does not make bed buying easy at all. I found a few more expensive beds that I like, I seem to be leaning towards plush/soft beds. $500 is the most I could scrape together, though I'd prefer to spend less. I just spent a couple weeks on a great ikea mattress, and need help finding something similar.

The closest I could find to the Sultan Finnvik was the Myrbacka Firm. It isn't identical, though, it lists the make up as: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft., 100 % lamb's wool
There is an additional layer there that the Sultan Finnvik doesn't have. I'm not sure what to make of that. Also concerned because it's listed as "firm". The medium firm is actually a latex model, containing: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Synthetic latex, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., 100 % lamb's wool

The closest in price point and build is the Ikea Matrand, which seems to do the same thing, breaking out latex as medium firm and firm is all foam.
Matrand Medium Firm: Comfort material: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Synthetic latex, Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft.
Matrand Firm: Comfort material: Polyester/viscose (rayon) fiber wadding, Polyurethane memory foam 3.1 lb/cu.ft, Polyurethane foam 1.7 lb/cu.ft:

I'm not beholden to Ikea either, other than I know my friends mattress was a dream. Can I look for mattresses with similar specs from, say, amazon?


I would also keep in mind that there are also no "standard" definitions or consensus of opinions for firmness ratings and different manufacturers can rate their mattresses very differently than others so a mattress that one manufacturer rates as being a specific firmness could be rated very differently by another manufacturer. Different people can also have very different perceptions of firmness and softness compared to others as well and a mattress that feels firm for one person can feel like "medium" for someone else or even "soft" for someone else (or vice versa) depending on their body type, sleeping style, physiology, their frame of reference based on what they are used to, and their individual sensitivity and perceptions. There are also different types of firmness and softness that different people may be sensitive to that can affect how they "rate" a mattress as well (see post #15 here ) so different people can also have very different opinions on how two mattresses compare in terms of firmness and and some people may rate one mattress as being firmer than another and someone else may rate them the other way around. This is all relative and very subjective and is as much an art as a science.

There is also more information in post #9 here about the different ways that one mattress can "match" or "approximate" another one. Every layer and component in a mattress (including the cover and any quilting materials) will affect the feel and performance of every other layer and component and the mattress "as a whole" so unless you are able to find another mattress that uses exactly the same type of materials, components, cover, layer thicknesses, layer firmnesses, and overall design (which would be very unlikely) then there really isn't a reliable way to match one mattress to another one in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP based on the specifications of the mattresses (even assuming that you can find out all the specifications you would need for both mattresses you are comparing in the first place).

Mattress manufacturers generally try to differentiate their mattress from the mattresses made by other manufacturers and don't normally try to "match" another mattress that is made by a different manufacturer so unless a manufacturer specifically says in their description of a mattress that one of their mattresses in the same general category is specifically designed to "match" or "approximate" another one in terms of firmness or "feel" and PPP and/or they are very familiar with both mattresses and can provide reliable guidance about how they compare based on the "averages" of a larger group of people that have compared them (different people may have very different opinions about how two mattresses compare) ... the only reliable way to know for certain how two mattresses would compare for you in terms of how they "feel" or in terms of firmness or PPP (regardless of anyone else's opinions of how they compare which may be different from your own) would be based on your own careful testing or actual sleeping experience on both of them.

I know you've read the tutorial but two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort" and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

When you can't test a mattress in person then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using (fast or slow response, resilience, firmness etc) and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

Because your own personal experience is the only way to know for certain whether any mattress will be a good "match" for you in terms of your specific criteria and PPP ... the exchange/return policy (and any costs involved) can also be a more important part of the "value" of an online purchase just in case (and in spite of the "best judgement" of everyone involved) the choice you make doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for.

What about other places? Any other recommendations? I would ideally like to keep the price around $300, but know that may not be possible.


There are some very general guidelines about what to expect in different budget ranges in this article . Your budget certainly doesn't leave much room to buy a mattress that uses good quality and durable materials but if you are considering online choices then some of the better lower budget options I'm aware of that would be worth considering are listed at the end of post #4 here and the other online lists it links to.

If you let me know your city or zip code I'd also be happy to let you know about any of the better options or possibilities I'm aware of in your area that may be worth considering as well.

Phoenix
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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 19:33 #4

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I know the budget is not going to get me a great mattress. But I can't wait any longer and I can't stand what I have. The costco mattress is returnable, which was one of the reasons I decided to try it. But I know the budget isn't great so I'm not looking for this mattress to last me forever, just something that could last me for a year or two. I really need something else now though, because I'm waking in pain every morning. It wasn't until the stay with a friend that I really realized how much it was my bed that was causing the physical pain. Or at least that a bed could relieve so much of it. I can deal with saving for a better mattress later.

I understand what you're saying with the 3.1lbs memory foam failing. But it happened to be the perfect comfort level for me at whatever point in breaking down it was at. There were no noticeable depressions in the foam, but my friend is a small guy. None-the-less, he was certain it was less firm than when he bought it in 2013. I guess my challenge and question then is how do I find a bed with a comfort layer that's "broken down" to that point? Is there a way I can guesstimate what resiliency it had to replicate it? It felt firmer than the mattress topper I have which is 3" 3lbs costco novaform.

I'm curious about the base layers. Looking at the differences between the older ikea and new models, the older model use a 2.2 lbs poly foam, while the new ones use a 1.7 lbs foam. What does that mean practically? I read the durability guide (thanks for that!) but it suggests that as a support layer, it's not that important. With something like the lower density 3.1lbs memory foam, does that make the density of the lower layer more important?

Also on that note, I realize "firm" is relative, but is there any reason that ikea would call 3.1 lbs density memory foam firm over latex? I tried their beds there a few months back (November) and I don't remember much other than I didn't like any of the foam compared to their Sultan Hultsvik which had a deliciously soft pillowtop layer. But at that point, I wasn't thinking I'd get an ikea model so didn't pay close attention.

My zip is 53146 - New Berlin, WI. Just outside of Milwaukee, WI. I am 135lbs, but only 5', so not distributed over a large area. I do use my bed a lot as a work space and couch though, which means it's used a lot.

One thought I had is that I love the costco mattress topper I got for the costco mattress. But I have the rock hard mattress below it. I've been wondering if buying a low cost foam mattress to act as a base layer could work. Something that has more give that the rock underneath this. I don't know if that's practical or stupid. ;) As mentioned above, it's a 3", 3lbs Novafoam memory foam topper. So it's not as dense as it should be, but I could always rotate it out yearly if it turns out I'm happy with the bed combo. If something like this isn't a horribly terrible idea, what should I be looking for as a base mattress?

I was looking at the dreamfoam mattresses on amazon based on some of the posts here. But I'm even less sure of those as there is just not enough info on them. That seems to be true of most mattresses, very few list the foam type or density. The few that do seem to have the ikea methodology of not listing the thickness of each layer and that seemed to go for dreamfoam as well.

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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 20:11 #5

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Hi twice,

There were no noticeable depressions in the foam, but my friend is a small guy.


The biggest issue with lower density memory foam is foam softening (or what some people call virtual impressions) ... not visible impressions. Foam softening can lead to the loss of comfort and/or support which is the biggest reason that most people will need to replace their mattress.

That's why a mattress that is several years old will be noticeably softer than a new version of the same mattress ... especially if it uses lower quality and less durable materials.

Is there a way I can guesstimate what resiliency it had to replicate it? It felt firmer than the mattress topper I have which is 3" 3lbs costco novaform.


Not based on the specs of a mattress no there isn't.

While knowing the specs that can affect the quality and durability of the layers and components in a mattress is always important ... unless you have a great deal of knowledge and experience with different types of mattress materials and components and their specs and different layering combinations and mattress designs and how they combine together and can translate them into your own "real life" experience that can be unique to you (which would generally be a very small percentage of people) ... I would tend to avoid using complex specs to try and predict how a mattress will feel or perform for you. When you try and choose a mattress based on complex combinations of specs that you may not fully understand or only based on specs for a single layer or component that may not be as relevant or meaningful as you believe it is then the most common outcome is "information overload" and "paralysis by analysis". Even the best mattress designers in the industry are often surprised at what a mattress they design "should have felt like" based on the specs when they design it and what it "actually feels like" when they test out their new design.

I'm curious about the base layers. Looking at the differences between the older ikea and new models, the older model use a 2.2 lbs poly foam, while the new ones use a 1.7 lbs foam. What does that mean practically?


Foam density has nothing to do with firmness or how a foam layer will feel and perform so the only thing that you can say with any certainty is that the lower foam density will be less durable.

I read the durability guide (thanks for that!) but it suggests that as a support layer, it's not that important. With something like the lower density 3.1lbs memory foam, does that make the density of the lower layer more important?


If you want to take the time to study it in more detail there is more about the many variables that can affect the durability and useful life of a mattress in post #4 here .

When you sleep on a mattress the upper layers of foam will compress and deflect more than the deeper layers partly because the comfort layers are usually made to be softer than the deeper transition and support layers of a mattress (and firmness/softness is also a factor in the durability of a material) and partly because they are closer to the sleeping surface and subject to direct compression without any layers above them absorbing some of the compression forces first. It's this constant deflection of the foam materials in the upper layers of the mattress that softens and breaks down the foam and leads to the loss of comfort and support in the mattress. This will also happen more under the heavier parts of the body such as the hips/pelvis than the lighter parts of the body. This is why the quality/durability of the upper layers (the top 3" to 6" of the mattress) are especially important in the durability and useful life of the mattress as a whole because they will usually be the weakest link in the mattress in terms of durability.

Also on that note, I realize "firm" is relative, but is there any reason that ikea would call 3.1 lbs density memory foam firm over latex?


The firmness of a mattress is rated "as a whole" and not just as a result of the firmness of any individual layers. For example a softer layer can sometimes allow you to "go through" the top layer more and "feel" more of the firmness of the layers underneath it and can feel firmer for some people than another mattress that uses the same support core but has a firmer comfort layer on top of it that will isolate you more from the firmness of the layer underneath it.

Of course the memory foam could be firmer or softer than the latex as well. Both materials come in a range of firmness levels although the range for latex is much wider than the range for memory foam which doesn't come in firmness levels that are firm enough to be used as a support core in a mattress (which is why all memory foam mattresses use a firmer material or component underneath the memory foam).

My zip is 53146 - New Berlin, WI. Just outside of Milwaukee, WI.


The better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Milwaukee area (subject to making sure that any mattress you consider meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines I linked in my earlier reply) are listed in post #2 here .

One thought I had is that I love the costco mattress topper I got for the costco mattress. But I have the rock hard mattress below it. I've been wondering if buying a low cost foam mattress to act as a base layer could work. Something that has more give that the rock underneath this. I don't know if that's practical or stupid. ;) As mentioned above, it's a 3", 3lbs Novafoam memory foam topper. So it's not as dense as it should be, but I could always rotate it out yearly if it turns out I'm happy with the bed combo. If something like this isn't a horribly terrible idea, what should I be looking for as a base mattress?


Although this can be a good strategy if you can test the mattress/topper combination in person before a purchase ... you can see my comments about choosing a firmer mattress first with the intention of adding a topper later in post #2 here . In most cases I would avoid this approach because of the uncertainty involved with two purchase choices instead of only one and choosing a topper that would be suitable in terms of PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) for a specific person on a specific mattress can sometimes be almost as difficult as choosing a mattress that doesn't need a topper in the first place. I would generally focus on choosing a mattress that is likely to be a suitable match without a topper (again unless you can test the combination in person or you are purchasing both online as a set and they both have a good return/exchange policy) and then use the option to add a topper as a "backup" strategy in case your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for rather than a "primary" strategy.

I was looking at the dreamfoam mattresses on amazon based on some of the posts here. But I'm even less sure of those as there is just not enough info on them. That seems to be true of most mattresses, very few list the foam type or density. The few that do seem to have the ikea methodology of not listing the thickness of each layer and that seemed to go for dreamfoam as well.


As you probably know Dreamfoam is one of the members of this site which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, knowledge, service, and transparency. They would certainly be well worth considering (and talking to on the phone) and I would definitely include them in your "lower budget" research.

Phoenix
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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 23:23 #6

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I would tend to avoid using complex specs to try and predict how a mattress will feel or perform for you. When you try and choose a mattress based on complex combinations of specs that you may not fully understand or only based on specs for a single layer or component that may not be as relevant or meaningful as you believe it is then the most common outcome is "information overload" and "paralysis by analysis".


Too Late! Just looking at mattresses over the past few months had me at the paralysis by analysis state. But I get your point. I have a bad habit of trying to solve what I can't by money by research/"temporary experting" which sometimes works, and sometimes is a dreadful failure. The two choices I've made so far were not because they were the best, but because I threw my hands up and new I had good return options.

I'm curious about the base layers. Looking at the differences between the older ikea and new models, the older model use a 2.2 lbs poly foam, while the new ones use a 1.7 lbs foam. What does that mean practically?


Foam density has nothing to do with firmness or how a foam layer will feel and perform so the only thing that you can say with any certainty is that the lower foam density will be less durable.


That makes sense. It doesn't help me figure out how it compares to the older model, but at least I know that it may or may not have relevancy related to the equivalent feel of the mattress.

My zip is 53146 - New Berlin, WI. Just outside of Milwaukee, WI.


The better options or possibilities I'm aware of in and around the Milwaukee area (subject to making sure that any mattress you consider meets your criteria and the quality/value guidelines I linked in my earlier reply) are listed in post #2 here .

I love Verlo mattresses! My 25 year old mattress is from there, and honestly, it held up amazingly well. Unfortunately, they're out of my price range. They also were bought out recently(ish) - the sales person I spoke to gave me the impression he was not thrilled with the current management and quality. I am inferring some of that but we got to talking and he hinted around it. It still seemed like one of the better options if it were in my price range.

I just found Beloit Mattresses earlier today when exploring the member sites here. It is definitely one I will look into more. I drive past Ken Michael's furniture all the time, but have never stopped in. I guess I should at least check it out.

(some snipping for brevity)

One thought I had is that I love the costco mattress topper I got for the costco mattress. But I have the rock hard mattress below it. I've been wondering if buying a low cost foam mattress to act as a base layer could work. . .


Although this can be a good strategy if you can test the mattress/topper combination in person before a purchase . . . In most cases I would avoid this approach because of the uncertainty involved . . . I would generally focus on choosing a mattress that is likely to be a suitable match without a topper . . .


While what you are saying makes a lot of sense - I perhaps foolishly got the idea in my head of ordering some foam as a base layer from Foam By Mail, or even finding a local foam shop. I found two local companies that appear to carry the correct foams (will need to call and confirm.). I read this topic and some of the related posts you linked in it. Which leads me down the rabbit hole of other posts linked in those posts.

I'm just entertaining the idea at this point, but sort of wondering if buying a 6" HD36-R foam or 4" HD36-R and 2" LUX-R foam wouldn't make a good base for now to include with my memory foam topper. I am still reading, and I know it's risky to do it this way without the specific experience. On the other hand, the cost is both low, and it really appeals to me that I could try various layers as I was able to afford it, making the "perfect" bed over time. I'd be going with a base with a shorter expectancy, but if I truly loved it, could go with a longer lasting base down the road. I've got an encasement which will be too big, but can get a properly sized cover once I am happy with the layers.

But I am really just entertaining the idea at this point.

As you probably know Dreamfoam is one of the members of this site which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, knowledge, service, and transparency. They would certainly be well worth considering (and talking to on the phone) and I would definitely include them in your "lower budget" research.

Yup, that is why I'm looking. Honestly, I *hate* talking on the phone, but probably need to suck it up for this.

Thank you for all your help. It's given me some food for thought. I had hoped finding a bed that worked would make the next steps easier, but I see now I have a lot of research in front of me.

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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 26 Feb 2016 23:39 #7

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Hi twice,

While what you are saying makes a lot of sense - I perhaps foolishly got the idea in my head of ordering some foam as a base layer from Foam By Mail, or even finding a local foam shop. I found two local companies that appear to carry the correct foams (will need to call and confirm.). I read this topic and some of the related posts you linked in it. Which leads me down the rabbit hole of other posts linked in those posts.

I'm just entertaining the idea at this point, but sort of wondering if buying a 6" HD36-R foam or 4" HD36-R and 2" LUX-R foam wouldn't make a good base for now to include with my memory foam topper. I am still reading, and I know it's risky to do it this way without the specific experience. On the other hand, the cost is both low, and it really appeals to me that I could try various layers as I was able to afford it, making the "perfect" bed over time. I'd be going with a base with a shorter expectancy, but if I truly loved it, could go with a longer lasting base down the road. I've got an encasement which will be too big, but can get a properly sized cover once I am happy with the layers.

But I am really just entertaining the idea at this point.


If you are considering ordering from Foambymail (AKA FBM or Foam Factory and other names as well) then I would read this post and this post and this topic (about their polyfoam and sources) and this post (presumably from a past employee) before buying anything or considering them as a reliable supplier that provides accurate information about their foam products.

Even though I suspect it will likely take you even deeper into the rabbit hole ... If you are attracted to the idea of designing and building your own DIY mattress out of separate components and a separate cover then the first place I would start is by reading option 3 in post #15 her e and the posts it links to (and option #1 and #2 as well) so that you have more realistic expectations and that you are comfortable with the learning curve, uncertainty, trial and error, or in some cases the higher costs that may be involved in the DIY process. While it can certainly be a rewarding project ... the best approach to a DIY mattress is a "spirit of adventure" where what you learn and the satisfaction that comes from the process itself is more important than any cost savings you may realize (which may or may not happen).

There is also more about primary or "deep" support and secondary or "surface" support and their relationship to firmness and pressure relief and the "roles" of different layers in a mattress in post #2 here and in post #4 here that may also be helpful in clarifying the difference between "support" and "pressure relief" and "feel" that may be useful as well.

If you decide to take on the challenge then I would either use the specs (if they are available) of a mattress that you have tested and confirmed is a good match for you in terms of PPP as a reference point or blueprint and try and "match" every layer and component in your reference mattress as closely as possible or use a "bottom up" approach (see post #2 here ).

Thank you for all your help. It's given me some food for thought. I had hoped finding a bed that worked would make the next steps easier, but I see now I have a lot of research in front of me.


I'm looking forward to finding out what you end up deciding.

Since I'm a believer in the KISS principle ... In its simplest form choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to first finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in the mattress relative to your weight range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Phoenix
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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 05 Mar 2016 23:18 #8

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Update: I got the latex Matrand (medium firm) from ikea today. I've not unwrapped it yet, we got home around 10p after spending the afternoon and evening with me trying mattresses over and over.

I had spent time since my last response looking at diy options, and had gotten really smitten with that, especially the idea of getting different layers and playing with order, etc... I probably would have too, but realized I had so much more research to do and was waking up every morning grumpier and grumpier. So Friday decided that's what Saturday would be. I wasn't entirely sure I would get a mattress today or not, but decided that I felt confident in my choice.

I did have a few interesting discoveries. I get now what you mean about construction and layer order; I fundamentally understood conceptually, but there were many IKEA mattresses that I thought I would have some guesses of what they'd be like based on their layer types and orders and I was dead wrong. I realize that IKEA doesn't release enough of their specs to truly make that judgement. Be I still felt like I would have some idea. Wrong!

I tried the firm Matrand and Myrbacka first as they were the closest to my friends Sultan Finnvik. They were hard as a rock! I patiently waited for the memory foam to "melt" in hopes that it would just take time. All I ended up with was pressure on my hips and shoulder. It did indent, but it just wasn't comfy enough. It's probably a testament to the short life of the 3.1 lbs memory foam as my friend's finnvik was firm and he described it in similar terms. But 3 years later, I found it comfortable and I lean towards plush beds, and he hates how soft it has gotten.

That also brought me to an interesting observation. The Costco memory foam topper I have is very soft and quickly sinks down. The memory foam on the firm matrand and myrbacka were hard as can be. That may have been partially due to firm support layers, but I also played around with the demo memory foam topper, and it was only slightly less "hard" on softer beds.

They have new innerspring mattresses that now come rolled up. Haugesund and Haugsvar. Well the Haugesund was new, it's possible that the Haugsvar just escaped my notice when I was there last fall. I tried the medium firm in both, and initially laying down felt good, my spine alignment was great (DHphotographed so I could evaluate.( But laying in them for extended periods caused a lot of pain, flaring up the inflamed nerves and my herniated disk. My hips were begging to rebel and even my shoulder joints had a fit. I can't explain why this would be. It sucked but it also meant I was trying the other mattresses at my worst, so I would have some idea of what that would be at home.

I briefly considered the Morgedal medium firm as a base layer and using my memory foam topper, but just wasn't quite convinced that would be a good idea. I kept thinking that if I go that route, I might as well go the FBM route and get a $100 base instead.

So on to the latex choices. I tried the matrand, myrbacka, and morgongava latex. Overall, I liked the latex a lot. I was surprised, when I was there last time, I wasn't especially impressed. I also looked at some latex mattresses at a couple mattress stores last fall and they didn't do anything. This time, it was my jam. I really liked the morgongava, it's seemed to have the right plush/soft feeling I wanted, but was still springy. The myrbacka was okay, but the matrand actually felt the best/softest between those two. I've seen a number of people mention that when looking for reviews at the store and post purchase. Unfortunately many that had said that, said the matrand was much firmer at home. I hope not, or if it is, that the break in is quick.

The support base might be part of the differences to, the matrand was on lonset slates, the myrbacka was on a solid foundation (I think they meant the slated foundations but I'm not sure. And the morgongava said it was on a spring base? Which I didn't know IKEA had, but that's what the tag said. So even if money wasn't a concern, I don't know from that helped account for the softer feel. I have the lonset slatted base. Fortunately the most similar to the show floor latex matrand.

Now, here is the part that worries me. My alignment was not great on the latex mattresses. All of them, my hips and shoulders (side sleeper) did not sink in far enough. But even with that in mind, they were the most comfortable. But I'm worried what it might be like after a night sleeping that way. I felt like I was sinking more than the two innerspring mattresses I tried and had straight alignment, but the picture didn't lie. Still, I decided that I was going to get the one that felt the best, and perhaps if need be, put my Costco memory foam topper on it. The latex layer is 4.7", but I know compression is different on latex and different types of latex. So I'm not sure what to think with not sinking in far enough on the hips and shoulder.

I will update once I've got the Matrand up and "running" so to speak. I am really hoping it works.

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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 06 Mar 2016 08:56 #9

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Hi twice,

The support base might be part of the differences to, the matrand was on lonset slates, the myrbacka was on a solid foundation (I think they meant the slated foundations but I'm not sure. And the morgongava said it was on a spring base? Which I didn't know IKEA had, but that's what the tag said. So even if money wasn't a concern, I don't know from that helped account for the softer feel. I have the lonset slatted base. Fortunately the most similar to the show floor latex matrand.


The amount of flex or deflection in the support system under a mattress can certainly affect how it feels and performs. The effect would be more noticeable with thinner mattresses, with spring mattresses, and is also more noticeable for some people than for others. If you test a mattress on a support system that flexes under the mattress and the combination is a good "match" for you in terms or PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and your Personal preferences) then it's normally a good idea to purchase the set when you buy the mattress. The Sultan Atloy is a box spring with springs inside it.

Now, here is the part that worries me. My alignment was not great on the latex mattresses. All of them, my hips and shoulders (side sleeper) did not sink in far enough. But even with that in mind, they were the most comfortable. But I'm worried what it might be like after a night sleeping that way. I felt like I was sinking more than the two innerspring mattresses I tried and had straight alignment, but the picture didn't lie. Still, I decided that I was going to get the one that felt the best, and perhaps if need be, put my Costco memory foam topper on it. The latex layer is 4.7", but I know compression is different on latex and different types of latex. So I'm not sure what to think with not sinking in far enough on the hips and shoulder.

I will update once I've got the Matrand up and "running" so to speak. I am really hoping it works.


I hope that it works well for you as well and I'm looking forward to your comments and feedback once you've had the chance to sleep on it for a bit. If it does turn out that the mattress is too firm and you aren't sinking in enough then It's also easier to soften up a mattress that is to firm than the other way around. Ikea also has a 90 day exchange policy as well.

Thanks for letting us know what you ended up deciding ... and congratulations on your new mattress.

Phoenix
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Ikea Sultan Finnvik equivalent recommendations? Sub $500 foam mattress 23 Nov 2016 22:18 #10

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It's many months later, and I have to say that I am happy with my choice. I don't notice the mattress one way or the other, which is probably the best compliment I can give a mattress. I am still using the costco mattress topper, but that that's more out of laziness - that and now that I'm used to it, I'm afraid I'd be freeeeezing if I took it off. Heck, now that winter is descending, I'm freezing anyway. I can't imagine how I survived pre-memory foam. I've actually had many of the pain problems I was having prior to this mattress clear up - I have no idea if it's actually related, but my husband pointed out that it was around the time I got a new mattress that the problems started to get better (of course, there are also about a half dozen other things that changed at that time.)

But I'm sold on latex. I may at some point try another mattress just to treat myself. I remember how much I liked the morgongava. But it wouldn't be over a dislike of this mattress thus far. (Who knows, maybe I'd hate a "better" mattress, ikea or otherwise? I do like the springiness of the latex layer a lot. It sinks, but not terribly so.

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