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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 27 Feb 2012 07:00 #11

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Hi ima,

Still trying to wrap my brain around the memory foam issue. I understand what the weight means and what IFD means but is there a standard or a way to compare the responsiveness of the foam?


Unfortunately no ... except in general descriptions which tend to be somewhat vague and non specific rather than "scientific". They can at least give you an idea though. In general the newer types of foam have been formulated to be a bit softer, less stiff when cooler, and more breathable. Some would say this has made memory foam worse (less of the desirable memory quality) and some would say it has made it better (more desirable features that are well worth less memory) depending on each person's preferences.

If I decide to to buy online how to I know I'm getting the feel I want. I obviously want the most durable foam (This is the reason we are avoiding the the big names, right) but my wife will shoot me if I get a slow responding foam.


Generally the better online manufacturers will give you good information about the general qualities of the memory foam they use and most of the better ones also have return policies which would make it self defeating to misdescribe their materials to you. Most will use Tempurpedic foams (or perhaps the iComfort) as an approximate reference. Usually the best choice is when there is a local manufacturer who offers good selection, quality, and value. Online choices are great if there are no better local choices available but I would personally prefer a local manufacturer where I could actually lie on their mattresses ... even if that involved a "reasonable" premium. Online is usually best when there are no good value choices in the area or if the premium for a local purchase is larger and can justify the greater risk of an online purchase.

The Aerus claims to be a newer technology and it seems they are saying it is more durable. How would this compare to an older 5lb, still less durable or the same? Also I have seen foam that is 4.5lb or 5.2lb. How much difference are the numbers behind the decimal point. How much difference would this be from a straight 5.0lb foam? (Sorry if this seems like a petty question but it has been bugging me)


I don't think Aerus is more durable than Sensus of comparable density which is one of the highest quality memory foams on the market even though it's slower responding more like the Tempurpedic. A slower responding memory foam under a faster responding memory foam can often provide a desirable feel for many people. Regardless of whether a memory foam is "newer" or "older" ... density is the most reliable way to compare durability (assuming the foams have no added materials in them).

Normally I use a description of 4 lb or 5 lb memory as a general quality guideline but 5.5 lb foam for example would generally be slightly more durable than say 5 lb foam which in turn would be slightly more durable than 4.5 lb memory foam. Minor differences in density wouldn't make a lot of difference and the feel and response of the foam would be more important than very small differences in density IMO. There's no magic in reaching 5 lbs from say 4.8 ... it's just a general guideline for quality and durability. Strangely enough though ... memory foams densities are generally in the lower half of the number range after the decimal point (from .1 to .5) probably because if a manufacturer chose to make say a 4.6 lb memory foam ... they would likely make it 5.0 lbs for better perceptual quality even though the difference would be fairly small.

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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 28 Feb 2012 03:47 #12

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Just got back from a road trip to Portland Mattress Makers and they are very nice, no high pressure and they were very informative. I have some stats and numbers that I hope you can clarify or give an opinion on.

Their Portland-Pedic has 7" of 1.8 lb HD Poly (They actually said they order it as 1834, not sure if this means the ILD is 34) On top of this is 3" of 5lb viscose memory foam (I asked if the foam was Certipur or even if it was US made and he didn't know but he said they get it from Carpenter out of Pennsylvania). The foam was very quick responding, very soft feeling. My wife finds it very comfy, me not so much (I feel it is too squishy, I could live with it though). I asked him if I put a wool protector on it how much would it slow down the foams response and he said that he it would also affect the conforming as the wool doesn't stretch and would actually hold you. This is my interpretation of what he said and it sounds right but I haven't heard anyone else say this..so..

They also had a latex bed that is 6" of 36 ILD of Dunlop topped with 2" of 23 ILD of Dunlop. I have to say I really like the feel of this, my wife not so much.

After this trip I was wondering if I went with Overnight Mattress if I could go with a half and half. Half memory foam for her, using either their 4Lb or if their 5Lb if it was of the quicker variity. Half latex for me in a ILD to give me the feel of Portland's bed.

I understand that the 4lb foam my not last as long but if it was just topper then it would be less expensive to replace. If the 5lb was as responsive as or a little less than the Portland foam then it would be perfect.

On the idea of latex I'm pretty sure that 2" of 23 ILD Dunlop latex on top of 6" of 36" ILD Dunlop would feel different than 3" of Talalay on top of 5" of 2.1lb Poly but would it be fairly close? Also being mostly a stomach and some side sleeper explain why I liked the latex better, you know more supportive material? (I do understand that 3" of foam isn't best for me but better for her and also that the Latex was 2" which would favor me and not her. Now that question is what would 3" of latex on Poly do?)

Sorry if none of this is coherent but I'm trying to process this out loud and hoping that you are able to understand and read fluid idiot ;)

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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 28 Feb 2012 17:48 #13

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Hi ima,

All your points and comments are right on the money!

Their Portland-Pedic has 7" of 1.8 lb HD Poly (They actually said they order it as 1834, not sure if this means the ILD is 34) On top of this is 3" of 5lb viscose memory foam (I asked if the foam was Certipur or even if it was US made and he didn't know but he said they get it from Carpenter out of Pennsylvania).


1834 means the ILD is 34 as you said. 1.8 lb polyfoam is suitable for a support core and 34 would be fairly typical in terms of ILD. Carpenter is a very large American foam manufacturer and their foams are CertiPur certified.

The foam was very quick responding, very soft feeling. My wife finds it very comfy, me not so much (I feel it is too squishy, I could live with it though). I asked him if I put a wool protector on it how much would it slow down the foams response and he said that he it would also affect the conforming as the wool doesn't stretch and would actually hold you. This is my interpretation of what he said and it sounds right but I haven't heard anyone else say this..so..


As you know different memory foams have different types of properties and feels even in the same density and which fees best is really a matter of preference. He is correct that putting another layer of fiber or foam over memory foam will put the body heat further from the foam and reduce its response and make it "firmer" and "slower". He is also correct about the effect of less stretchy covers but some are more stretchy than others (Dormeir for example is a thinner and more stretchy wool protector but would still isolate body heat from the memory foam).

After this trip I was wondering if I went with Overnight Mattress if I could go with a half and half. Half memory foam for her, using either their 4Lb or if their 5Lb if it was of the quicker variity. Half latex for me in a ILD to give me the feel of Portland's bed.


I'm sure they would be happy to quote you a price for any option you chose. I would bear in mind though that there will be a middle area which had a noticeable "transition" between the two very different halves which would feel quite odd for someone sleeping on the middle of the mattress. Their 5.3 lb foam is apparently considerably firmer and slower responding than their middle option (which is actually 4.5 lb memory foam). The difference in feel between different memory foams can be very subjective and is really a comparison between two different people's descriptions whose perceptions may be different from each other. The only way to know for sure would be to try both side by side so there would be somewhat of a "risk" in ordering a foam you hadn't tried but they would likely be somewhat comparable. I will say that many manufacturers have told me that they believe that Carpenter makes a very nice feeling foam.

On the idea of latex I'm pretty sure that 2" of 23 ILD Dunlop latex on top of 6" of 36" ILD Dunlop would feel different than 3" of Talalay on top of 5" of 2.1lb Poly but would it be fairly close? Also being mostly a stomach and some side sleeper explain why I liked the latex better, you know more supportive material? (I do understand that 3" of foam isn't best for me but better for her and also that the Latex was 2" which would favor me and not her. Now that question is what would 3" of latex on Poly do?)


Dunlop has a noticeably different feel than Talalay (even in the same ILD) and the difference is enough that many people have a strong preference for one over the other ... especially in a comfort layer. Dunlop is less "lively": or "springy" and also gets firmer with deeper compression than Talalay of the same ILD. Polyfoam is "stiffer" and much less elastic than any latex in the same ILD and while the comfort layer is a big part of how a mattress feels ... the foam in the support core will also make a noticeable difference in the overall feel of a mattress. How each person feels these differences can vary widely depending on weight and body shape, how much they move and change positions, and different sensitivities to different feels in a mattress. The only way to really know for sure is to lie on them personally. In general though ... polyfoam under latex would be the closest to an all latex feel and HR polyfoam (rather than the more typical 1.8 - 2.4 lb HD polyfoam used in support layers) would be closer yet but also more expensive.

The difference between a 2" and a 3" comfort layer can be quite dramatic and also depends on a person's weight, shape, and sleeping positions. Side sleepers will notice it more (they are more likely to go "through" a thinner comfort layer) and feel more of the properties of the layers below it. The thinner a layer is ... the more you will feel the properties of the layers below it.

Hope this helps a bit and that I've answered your questions well enough for you to get a sense of things (without actually feeling the differences in your own experience which is always more accurate than anyone else's descriptions). And your questions are very "coherent" :)

Phoenix
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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 29 Feb 2012 19:26 #14

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Okay I'm getting close I think. I'm thinking of maybe going with the cool bamboo from OvernightMattress and asking them to split the memory foam in half and then inserting some latex from Foamorder.com clearance. If I do this then I would order two pieces, one would be 2" of N25( I'm guessing that the "N" means IFD) as top layer and one piece of 1" N36 under this (I need three inches to match the memory foam side). I'm hoping that this will give me the feel of an all latex mattress and give her the memory foam she liked. (I Wonder if they would sell me a king sized mattress with only a twin lx top? if not it would give me an extra foam when hers wears out).

But if I do this am I just better off just building one from scratch? I can't help but see that they are only a few pieces of foam and if I can buy the same thing why wouldn't I.

If I go the build it myself route where would be the best place to get the support core? Also I like cover that design of Overnightmattress uses, is there anyone who sell similar covers?

Sorry if this is taking a strange turn, but it just seems that this is the natural progression. I also totally blame you. I mean you give us the knowledge and you create us mattress monters :lol: .

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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 29 Feb 2012 21:15 #15

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Hi ima,

Sorry if this is taking a strange turn, but it just seems that this is the natural progression. I also totally blame you. I mean you give us the knowledge and you create us mattress monters .


Now that's funny ... and I'll happily take the blame for this one :)

My own thoughts about the different "directions" in buying a mattress would go something like this ...

OPTION 1: My first choice would be to buy something I know and had tested locally. This would be particularly true if it involved a knowledgeable and experienced local manufacturer or retailer that was transparent about the type and quality of all the materials and components in their mattresses (so I knew the quality and value of what was in my mattress) and who would be able to provide some good guidance and/or has good options and/or suggestions after a purchase to help you make any "fine tuning adjustments" at a nominal cost if my sleeping experience didn't quite match my testing. This is by far the least "risky" option and well worth a premium over other approaches IMO.

OPTION 2: If there were no high quality and value local options, or if the difference between what I wanted to buy locally was more than about 20% (as an arbitrary number that each person can decide for themselves) compared to a directly comparable mattress from an online manufacturer or retailer ... then I would consider going in the direction of buying online with the help and guidance of a manufacturer or retailer who has the experience and knowledge to help you make your best choice out of the options that they offer. They often offer choices that can help you customize your mattress to different degrees and/or usually offer some ability to change your choices after a purchase at a reasonable cost if it doesn't turn out quite right. While this is more "risky" because sometimes smaller changes from your "preferred" design can make a bigger difference than people suspect, this risk can be reduced with more detailed conversations with the manufacturer who you are considering. Sometimes the opposite is also true that some differences will be less important than someone who analyzes too much may think. If the price difference and your " personal value equation " justifies it though, it would certainly be worth strong consideration.

OPTION 3: The final direction is the riskiest of all and involves buying separate components from different places where you may not really know how the layers and components you are buying will interact together. I would consider this direction if the potential savings over option #2 seemed significant enough to make the added risk worth it. This approach involves more knowledge and preferably some detailed local testing of known layers to reduce the risk and cost of making mistakes which can add to costs. If you have the knowledge of materials and enough experience from local testing to be able to predict with some certainty which layering will be best for you then it can be the least costly of all the options (although it sometimes doesn't represent significant savings over option #2) but if you lack the knowledge or experience you need then this can also turn into a "project" with unexpected difficulties or surprising results. If you end up with "components" that aren't quite right ... there can be a much greater than expected cost involved in buying new layers and making adjustments after the fact.

It can be very satisfying to build your own mattress but I would only go in this direction if your knowledge level and personal experience with different types of foams, mattress components, and layering combinations was well above average and in full awareness of the possible risks and additional expenses involved in the trial and error process. I would also try to stick with proven designs and use the same materials, layers, and construction as much as possible (including the cover which is often overlooked and can have a significant effect on the feel and performance as well as the cost of the mattress). This method is more about becoming an expert rather than the simpler method of "finding the experts" either locally or online. In effect you are exchanging a great deal of time, effort, study, research, local testing, a steep learning curve, and the possibility of some costly mistakes for the potential of some savings and of course on the other side the satisfaction that can come from designing and building a mattress completely on your own. Post #15 here and post #5 here and post #7 here and post #25 here would also be worth reading if you decide to go in this direction

The "best" approach to a complete DIY mattress is a "spirit of adventure" and a willingness to go through the trial and error it can involve and where what you learn and the satisfaction that comes from the DIY process itself is more important than any cost savings you may realize (which may or may not turn out to be the case).

In your case ... a 2" layer of N25 Dunlop over a 1" layer of N36 Dunlop would be fairly similar to what you tried and liked but there would be a difference because of the different materials that were underneath it. This would be on the firm side for a typical side sleeper (although heavier weights would feel this as softer than lighter weights and you have the advantage of having tried this and knowing that it provided enough pressure relief on your side) but the advantage would be that it would be better for stomach sleeping because there would be less of a chance for sleeping in a swayback position. Bear in mind too that the type of quilting/ticking used would also play a role in how any particular option felt to you.

So overall you are going in a good direction in terms of what you are considering IMO. You are asking the "right" questions. In essence you started with #1, are considering #2 and considering moving towards #3. The goal is to make your choices with realistic expectations of success.

If you decide to go all the way into #3 ... then choosing layers that have known specs and that closely approximate what you have tried in person and worked well for you can be a good blueprint. In this case ... I would check the websites and/or call and talk with the online manufacturers of this site as a "reference point" in terms of cost ( DIY Natural Bedding , SleepEz and Arizona Premium / mattresses.net offer layers as components and often carry layers which are not listed on their site) and then purchase the components from a reliable source that describes their products accurately and that you have confidence would actually supply what you are ordering. Post #4 here has a list of sources for various mattress components for those who are going in the direction of option 3.

Foam Order would be a supplier that I would consider to be good although they may not always have the best prices when compared with other options. Amazon, Overstock, and other even "riskier" choices like Ebay could also be good choices for materials and components if you have confidence that what you are buying is correctly described (which is not always the case) and suitable for your needs and preferences. This can take some research.

Zip covers of various types (quilted with wool or other materials and unquilted) can be also purchased from one of the sources listed in the DIY link two paragraphs up. Making sure the cover you buy fits well with the layers you are buying is also important. You want a nice tight fit not a loose "approximate" fit or one where you have to squish the foam too much to get it in (which will change the feel of your mattress).

So overall ... I would take a careful look at the benefits and cost savings of each approach and compare it with the realistic risk ... plug this into your "personal value equation"... and then go in the direction that you are most comfortable with and lets you be the involved in the design and construction of your mattress to the degree that you feel best about.

Phoenix
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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 01 Mar 2012 19:37 #16

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Okay here we go:

Looked at option #1: Buy locally isn't on the plate right now. The reason is that at $1299 for a 9" memory foam mattress it seems a little high for the price for what you get. If you remember you said that based on the stats that the overnightmattress was a better deal (and I agree). Plus my wife felt that while the 5lb foam was comfortable, she felt that it was too soft and fell right through it, making this option less appealing. I also think I fell in love with the latex and I know that adding this would raise the price and On a side note I wish to say that it is impressive that you are encouraging a local place

Option #2: If I were to order online I'm leaning towards the Overnightmattress' Cool Bamboo at just $799 plus they have a code for 10% off. I did ask and they can ship it with the top foam cut in half and I could remove half of it and add my own latex which would add a cost of $219 (a piece of 2"N25 and one .9"N36). I know it is 4+lb and won't last as long but I would have an extra piece or replace it with a favorable 5+lb foam down the line (it would be only twinXL).

Option #3: I have looked around and here is what I have found:
Starting from the bottom: hd36 1" and lux HQ 5" My thinking is that the one inch would act as a buffer before the very firm base.
Her side: 4lb 2" Aerus memory foam and 5.3lb 1" memory foam (I know that this is imported foam but I'm hoping it would give a slight firm feel under the 4lb) Set me straight on this if I'm off base.

My side: 1. piece Long Twin soft approx 2 x 38 x 80 (N25) Natural Sense 100% natural latex mattress pad foam. 2. Natural Sense 100% natural latex mattress pad foam topper, twin long size approx .9 x 38 x 80 (N36). Both of these on clearance for $219.

Cover for $218 or St. Dormeir: Wool Mattress Protectors for $208. If you could recommend something different, feel free.

All of this costs about $883 without shipping which may be about $90 though most of it is shipping for the latex which I would have to apply to the cool bamboo as well.

So this brings the cost of Option #1 and Option #2 about the same. I was hoping that you could give some insight and set me straight in the errors of my ways.

Feels like the first time on the open road without my training wheels.:woohoo: :woohoo: :sick:

EDIT: Just want to add that either of these will be going on this: Premier Platform Bed Frame

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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 02 Mar 2012 03:40 #17

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Hi ima,

Looked at option #1: Buy locally isn't on the plate right now. The reason is that at $1299 for a 9" memory foam mattress it seems a little high for the price for what you get. If you remember you said that based on the stats that the overnightmattress was a better deal (and I agree).


Here's the process I would go through (for the benefit of those who may be following)

As I mentioned ... I would personally pay a premium to buy a known mattress from a local manufacturer rather than taking the risk of buying online ... but only to a point. A relatively small difference of say 20% or less spread out over the life of a mattress would not justify the risk for me. Each of us needs to decide on our own number though where the savings are worth the risk of buying a mattress that is somewhat "unknown". If the premium is too much though, then I would certainly make an online purchase my next option. Since the $1299 of the Portland Pedic is more than say 20% more than the high density memory foam at Overnight (which has an extra cost so is actually more than the $799 less the discount as well) ... then I'd probably go with the Overnight unless the Portland Pedic was absolutely "perfect" in which case I'd still strongly consider it.

I'm assuming too that you've looked at your options at maidenmaine which may have options you haven't considered yet and which may work very well.

Regarding option #2.

Your choices here look like good ones as long as your Dunlop comfort layers work well for you. The only down side to this mix would be the transition between latex and memory foam in the middle of the mattress.

Regarding option #3.

I personally wouldn't order anything from foambymail or any of their alternative websites. IMO ... the risks are to high that their foams are misdescribed and the small saving isn't worth the risk.

There is some 5 lb Aerus here if that's the direction you are looking at. With your greater weights ... you could add another inch of other material and a little thickness on top is not a bad idea. I would personally avoid any unknown or memory foam that hasn't been CertiPur certified or has another good certification. There are just too many good options to take the chance. Foam order will supply you with American made foam if you ask. There are some good Sensus foams which would probably work well and you can even get Venus which is higher density yet. There are some links in this thread to some good options.

I would also consider going thicker than 9".

You will need both a mattress zip cover to surround and protect the foam and complete your mattress and also a protector to protect the mattress from moisture, body oils, etc. The SleepEz non quilted cover is also very nice and a little less. There's a picture in post #76 here (the color is actually off white). The Dormeir is a very nice wool protector but bear in mind it may firm up memory foam by isolating it somewhat from heat. If you do a forum "title search" on "protector" or "cover" (without the quotes) there's lots of information about various mattress protectors and covers.

Like the difference between option 1 and 2 ... I would only go with option 3 if there was significant savings or another compelling reason (for example the challenge of designing your own mattress) to take the "risk".

Phoenix
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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 04 Mar 2012 00:13 #18

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Squeaky....squeaky......squeaky (the sound of putting training wheels humbly back on bike :unsure: )

Okay Checked out Portland mattress again and just not impressed. Don't get me wrong, they are nice and everything but I feel they are a spring mattress maker that happen to sell a memory foam mattress. I asked if I could change something and I was told that the mattress is shipped from the factory the way it is. So they don't put it together. Also the cover was a very thin terry cloth (you could see through it). I also checked out MadianMaine and same thing (wanted to sell springs but had one memory foam that came as is and was $1499. So I have closed the door on this option.

I also think I'm going to drop the latex for now. I'll try that as my next project (I have to earn my big boy pants first:) )

You mentioned to have a mattress deeper than 9". I find this interesting as the "Cool Bamboo" is 9" and both local shops were 9". Could you explain why and what layering would be good

I have read about the 2 1.5" Aerus 5lb that it is more responsive than say the Sensus. Which seems positive. Do you know if the topper at Sam's is truly King size? (King Dimensions: 4" H x 76" W x 80") Also what would be a good filler layer to get me the depth I need? What do you think of 1" of 4lb on top of a 5lb? (it seems that it would give a slightly softer feel, yet would it slow down the responsiveness of the 5lb under it?)

Also would DuraFlex™ D34 work as a support core? Or point me in the right direction. (Also do you know anything about Foamorder's memory foam quality?)

I talked to overnight mattress and asked about their 5lb foam and he really wanted to steer me away from that and stick with 4lb.

I'm still tempted to put together my own as most of what I'm looking at are made of a base, (maybe a transition layer), then the supportive layer and then a cover. The trick is to find the right parts.

The 4 Way Stretch Zipper Cover Non Quilted has a $49 dollar shipping charge, right?

Thanks for all your time and insight.

I'm going to just ride around in circles now in my fenced in safety zone listening to my training wheels squeak.

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Re: Have you ever heard of ?? 04 Mar 2012 04:09 #19

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Hi ima,

I'm going to play a bit of "devils advocate" here so that you don't get the idea that creating your own design is as simple as you may think once you start to go beyond more "standardized" layering that fairly closely "duplicates" a layering you have tested personally.

So if I understand you correctly you are committed to a "memory foam mattress" of some type and you are leaning towards ordering the various components to design and put it together yourself. It's not unusual to see local manufacturers only carrying basic memory foam models ... and they often use another manufacturer to make them so they don't have to prototype their own for the fire regulations. Another reason they often do this is because there are many local manufacturers who are not fans of memory foam in any variation or density and only carry them for customers who insist on having them.

This (option 3) would not be my first choice by any means and I believe it is by far the riskiest way to go ... mainly because there are so many variables that you may not be aware of ... that someone with the knowledge of the materials and layering they use and how layers interact together would greatly increase your odds of success. Having said that ... there's absolutely nothing wrong with giving it a go on your own if your expectations are low (meaning you are well aware of the potential for mistakes that can be costly) and you are dealing with a reputable and knowledgeable outlet that sells a range of quality materials within your budget.

I would also make a point of having some extensive conversations with various manufacturers and outlets that you plan to order your materials and tell them of your "statistics" (weight, height, sleeping positions etc) and your preferences to gather as much information as you can about what they would recommend in your circumstances. If they are a good outlet ... they will be able to give you some very good guidance as to the best choices of materials that they offer that would be most suitable for your weight and budget.

You mentioned to have a mattress deeper than 9". I find this interesting as the "Cool Bamboo" is 9" and both local shops were 9". Could you explain why and what layering would be good


I mentioned that this would be something I would include as a consideration if I was building my own mattress because it would be easy to do if you are designing your own. The main reason is that a thicker mattress will often work better with heavier weights, doesn't have the same risk of feeling like you are bottoming out, and can adapt to different sleeping positions better. It also allows for the use of firmer foams which compress to a lower percentage of their thickness which increases durability. That's not to say that 9" wouldn't be suitable but that this should be a consideration if you have the choice of any thickness you want. I would definitely include this possibility in your discussions with the outlets where you plan to order. The higher the quality of foam (and the higher the compression modulus) the less necessary this may be but it is definitely worth considering as an option if your budget allows it.

I have read about the 2 1.5" Aerus 5lb that it is more responsive than say the Sensus. Which seems positive. Do you know if the topper at Sam's is truly King size? (King Dimensions: 4" H x 76" W x 80") Also what would be a good filler layer to get me the depth I need? What do you think of 1" of 4lb on top of a 5lb? (it seems that it would give a slightly softer feel, yet would it slow down the responsiveness of the 5lb under it?)


Yes, the Aerus is more responsive and breathable than the Sensus (which is also very high quality but a "slower" memory foam). Sam's club lists it as a king so I have no reason to think it's other than that. I would tend to avoid 4 lb memory foam with your weights unless you are willing to accept a shorter lifespan and if you used a 5 lb Aerus on top there would be little reason to use it. If you add more memory foam I would add firmer/denser memory foam underneath the Aerus. As far as what else could go under this ... the most accurate way to know would based on your own testing on different types of layering. Failing that ... the knowledge of a manufacturer or outlet would be your best guide concerning the specific foams they sell.

I wouldn't consider a middle layer as a "filler" as much as a "transition" layer and I would tend to use high quality more resilient foam (like latex or high quality polyfoam) rather than more memory foam. Latex would certainly be my first choice here. I am a big believer in using memory foam in thinner layers, especially with heavier weights ... to avoid the tendency to sink in too far and cause alignment problems. It's much easier to add a thin layer of memory foam as a topper than to take it away if you go too thick. Thinner layers are also cooler because you won't sink in as far and if the layers underneath it are more resilient then there is less of a tendency to feel "trapped" in your mattress.

I would tend towards a very firm 6" bottom layer of high quality and firm foam on the bottom (and subject to a conversation with foam order) I would tend towards the D44 for the base foam rather than the D34. I would probably add a couple of inches or so of the everflex V34 (or better yet medium latex) as a transition layer in between the memory foam and the base foam. This layer will be a big part of the feel of the mattress since the 2.5" of memory foam will allow you to feel the layers below it and you want the firmness to more gradually blend in with the firmer support layer.

Bear in mind that these are not "recommendations" but general guidelines only that can be the basis for discussions with your suppliers or manufacturer. They are meant to help you ask better questions. There are hundreds of different types of foams and the people selling them know much more about their own particular materials and their qualities and specs ... especially when it comes to their memory foams and polyfoams ... than I do. The person selling the foam (or making the mattress) is always the best source of specific information about what they are selling (as long as they are reliable suppliers). I know that Alan at Foam Order is very helpful this way. I would also ask Alan about the quality of his memory foam. He has told me that it is very high quality but I believe that it is not CertiPur certified and that he can supply other types of memory foam if you prefer it.

The higher 5.3 lb memory foam at overnight mattress is much firmer than most memory foams (I believe it is 18 ILD) which may have been the reason they didn't recommend it because most people prefer a softer acting memory foam.

I'm still tempted to put together my own as most of what I'm looking at are made of a base, (maybe a transition layer), then the supportive layer and then a cover. The trick is to find the right parts.

The 4 Way Stretch Zipper Cover Non Quilted has a $49 dollar shipping charge, right?


Again ... I would tend to work with a manufacturer who has more experience in building mattresses for many different types of people and are good at "hearing" what someone is telling them and then "translating" it into a construction where the odds of your satisfaction are better. As far as I know ... the shipping charge on their website is correct but some of their information is out of date so a quick call can confirm it.

Overall ... I would spend some time on the phone gathering input from people who sell mattresses using the materials that you want. The insights and knowledge you gain will make your final choices about which way to go much easier. While your own testing is the most valuable source of information as to what may work for you ... phone conversations with experts in the field are by far the next most valuable way to gain the confidence that will lead to your best choices.

Phoenix
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Last edit: by phoenix.

Re: Have you ever heard of ?? (updated) 25 May 2012 00:59 #20

  • ima
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I thought I would give an update. I bought a bed.:)

First of all thanks for all the help and information.

Second: As you advised I called and talked to several foam companies. I really was impressed with Foamorder. I told them what I was thinking about and all about us (our sizes, sleeping positions ans the such). He made ans explained what he would recommend. We talked about their pre-made beds and also what would be best to build our own.

With my and my wife's sleeping needs I was talking about a split bed. I thanked the gentlemen for his help and wanted to take a few days to process this information.

I was looking at their clearance section and they had a bed there that fit the description of what I wanted. The bed was made for someone who changed their mind after delivery. It was a split 10" deluxe. a $1200 bed for $500:) This was way cheaper than building our own of equal value or any bed anywhere of equal build quality.

I would like to point out a few things about Foamorder. The shipping is estimated at time of order and you don't know what the real amount is until it is charged to your card. In my case the estimate was over $50 off (not in my favor), they also charged around $20 dollars for processing (this is for vacuum packing the bed) and this was also more than they quoted.

The bed arrived looking like a 100lb burrito. When we opened it there was no strong odor (maybe a slight smell) and it was in perfect condition. We have had the bed for a week and just love it. It does sleep warmer than our old sping bed but we expected that. We will have to wait to see how the 5.3lb foam hold up. They say that the base foam is 3 lb/ft3 EverFlex yet my side is med-firm and my wife's side is med-soft. Are both sides 3 lbs or would her side be less since it it softer? I looked at their site and they list a 3lb foam so I'm guessing it is just for their own beds.

Just wanted to give an update and ask a question about the foam but mostly so say thanks and encourage you to keep on keeping on.

Blessings to you.

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